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Love, Amy The Selected Letters of Amy Clampitt

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ISBN-10: 0231132875

ISBN-13: 9780231132879

Edition: 2007

Authors: Amy Clampitt, Willard Spiegelman

List price: $34.00
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Description:

This extraordinary collection of letters sheds light on one of the most important postwar American poets and on a creative woman's life from the 1950s onward. Amy Clampitt was an American original, a literary woman from a Quaker family in rural Iowa who came to New York after college and lived in Manhattan for almost forty years before she found success (or before it found her) at the age of 63 with the publication of The Kingfisher. Her letters from 1950 until her death in 1994 are a testimony to her fiercely independent spirit and her quest for various kinds of truth-religious, spiritual, political, and artistic. Written in clear, limpid prose, Clampitt's letters illuminate the habits of imagination she would later use to such effect in her poetry. She offers, with wit and intelligence, an intimate and personal portrait of life as an independent woman recently arrived in New York City. She recounts her struggle to find a place for herself in the world of literature as well as the excitement of living in Manhattan. In other letters she describes a religious conversion (and then a gradual religious disillusionment) and her work as a political activist. Clampitt also reveals her passionate interest in and fascination with the world around her. She conveys her delight in a variety of day-to-day experiences and sights, reporting on trips to Europe, the books she has read, and her walks in nature. After struggling as a novelist, Clampitt turned to poetry in her fifties and was eventually published in the New Yorker. In the last decade of her life she appeared like a meteor on the national literary scene, lionized and honored. In letters to Helen Vendler, Mary Jo Salter, and others, she discusses her poetry as well as her surprise at her newfound success and the long overdue satisfaction she obviously felt, along with gratitude, for her recognition.
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Book details

List price: $34.00
Copyright year: 2007
Publisher: Columbia University Press
Publication date: 12/4/2007
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 336
Size: 5.75" wide x 8.75" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.946
Language: English

Amy Clampitt was born in New Providence, Iowa on June 15, 1920. She graduated from Grinnell College and moved to New York City. To support herself, she worked as a secretary at the Oxford University Press, a reference librarian at the Audubon Society, and a freelance editor. Her first published poem appeared in The New Yorker in 1978. Her first volume of poetry, The Kingfisher, was published in 1983. Her other books include What the Light Was Like, Archaic Figure, Westward, A Silence Opens, and Her Collected Poems. A recipient of the Guggenheim fellowship in 1982, she was also granted the Fellowship Award of the Academy of American Poets in 1984 and the MacArthur Prize Fellow in 1992. She taught at the College of William and Mary, Smith College, and Amherst College She died of cancer on September 10, 1994.

The Beginnings
The Origins of Government
The First Civil War and Sect Formation
The Umayyads
The Waning of the Tribal Tradition, c.700-900
General
The Kharijites
The Mu'tazilites
The Shi'ites of the Umayyad Period
The 'Abbasids and Shi'ism
The Zaydis
The Imamis
The Hadith Party
Coping with a Fragmented World
General
The Persian Tradition and Advice Literature
The Greek Tradition and 'Political Science'
The Ismailis
The Sunnis
Government and Society
The Nature of Government
The Functions of Government
Visions of Freedom
The Social Order
Muslims and Non-Muslims (a) Infidels (b) Muslims as Infidels
Epilogue: Religion, Government and Society Revisited
Bibliography
Abbreviations and Conventions
Index and Glossary