Skip to content

Courage in a Dangerous World The Political Writings of Eleanor Roosevelt

Spend $50 to get a free DVD!

ISBN-10: 0231111819

ISBN-13: 9780231111812

Edition: 1999 (Reprint)

Authors: Eleanor Roosevelt, Allida M. Black

List price: $32.00
Shipping box This item qualifies for FREE shipping.
Blue ribbon 30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee!
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
Carrot Coin icon
XP icon
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Description:

Dozens of books have been written about Eleanor Roosevelt, but her own writings are largely confined to the Roosevelt archives in Hyde Park. Courage in a Dangerous World allows her own voice again to be heard. Noted Eleanor Roosevelt scholar Allida M. Black has gathered more than two hundred columns, articles, essays, and speeches culled from archives whose pages number in the millions, tracing her development from timorous columnist to one of liberalism's most outspoken leaders. From "My Day" newspaper columns about Marian Anderson and excerpts from Moral Basis of Democracy and This Troubled World to speeches and articles on the Holocaust and McCarthyism, this anthology provides readers with the tools to reconstruct the politics of a woman who redefined American liberalism and democratic reform. Arranged chronologically and by topic, the volume covers the New Deal years, the White House years, World War II at home and abroad, the United Nations and human rights, the Cold War, the civil rights movement, the resurgence of feminism, and much more. In addition, the collection features excerpts from Eleanor Roosevelt's correspondence with Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Adlai Stevenson, J. Edgar Hoover, John F. Kennedy, and ordinary Americans. The volume features a collection of 30 rare photographs. A comprehensive bibliography of Eleanor Roosevelt's articles serves as a valuable resource, providing a link to the issues she held dear, many of which are still hotly debated today.
Customers also bought

Book details

List price: $32.00
Copyright year: 1999
Publisher: Columbia University Press
Publication date: 10/6/2000
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 360
Size: 6.00" wide x 8.75" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.144
Language: English

Eleanor Roosevelt, October 11, 1884 - November, 1962 Eleanor Roosevelt was born in New York City on October 11, 1884, to Anna Hall and Elliott Roosevelt. Her mother died in 1892, and she and her brother went to live with Grandmother Hall. Her father died only two years later. She attended a distinguished school in England when she became of age, at 15. She met and married her distant cousin Franklin, in 1905. In Albany, Franklin served in the state Senate from 1910 to 1913, and Eleanor started her career as political helpmate. She gained a knowledge of Washington and its ways while he served as Assistant Secretary of the Navy. When he was stricken with polio in 1921, she tended him and became active in the women's division of the State Democratic Committee to keep his interest in politics alive. He successfully campaigned for governor in 1928 and eventually won the Presidency with Eleanor by his side. When Eleanor came to the White House in 1933, she understood social conditions better than any of her predecessors and she transformed the role of First Lady. She never shirked official entertaining. She broke precedence to hold press conferences, traveled to all parts of the country and give lectures and radio broadcasts, and also wrote a daily syndicated newspaper column, "My Day." After the President's death in 1945 she returned to a cottage at his Hyde Park estate. Within a year, however, she became the American spokeswoman in the United Nations. She continued her career until her strength began to wane in 1962. She died in New York City that November, and was buried at Hyde Park beside her husband.

Preface
Introduction
The New Deal Years: 1933--1940
The State's Responsibility for Fair Working Conditions
I Want You to Write to Me
Old Age Pensions
Subsistence Farmsteads
The New Governmental Interest in the Arts: A Speech before the Twenty-Fifth Annual Convention of the American Federation of Artists
In Defense of Curiosity
The Negro and Social Change
Are We Overlooking the Pursuit of Happiness?
Married Persons Clause of the Economy Act
The Southern Conference on Human Welfare
ER to Lorena HickokHenry Grady Hotel Atlanta
Marian Anderson and the Daughters of the American Revolution
The Federal Theater Project
Women Politics, and Policy
The Works Progress Administration
The Moral Basis of Democracy
Women in Politics
Insuring Democracy
Helping Them to Help Themselves
The Threat of War: 1935--1945
"Because the War Idea Is Obsolete"
"This Troubled World"
Cash and Carry
The Invasion of Poland
Wartime Sacrifice
Should There Be A Referendum on War?
The Bombing of Britain
Pearl Harbor
The Nazi Camps
The Holocaust
D-Day
D-Day, by Continued
Conscientious Objectors
Total War
Equal Justice for All
The Atomic Bomb
The Home Front: 1939--1945
"Keepers of Democracy"
"Intolerance"
"Why I Still Believe in the Youth Congress"
"Civil Liberties--The Individual and the Community"
"Social Gains and Defense"
"Race Religion and Prejudice"
"Must We Hate to Fight?"
"Freedom: Promise or Fact"
"Abolish Jim Crow!"
"A Challenge to American Sportsmanship"
"Henry A. Wallace's "Democracy Reborn"
FDR's Death
The United Nations and Human Rights: 1945--1953
"The Universal Declaration of Human Rights"
"The Promise of Human Rights"
"Statement on Draft Covenant on Human Rights"
"Reply to Attacks on U.S. Attitude Toward Human Rights Covenant"
"UN: Good U.S. Investment"
"The Universal Validity of Man's Right to Self-Determination"
"U.N. Deliberations on Draft Convention on the Political Rights of Women"
"Eisenhower Administration Rejects Treaty"
ER's Response
The Cold War Abroad: 1945--1963
Revisiting Yalta
"The Russians Are Tough"
The Korean War
Truman's Dismissal of MacArthur
China and the Korean War
"First Need: Resettlement"
"The Changing India"
"Soviet Attacks on Social Conditions in U.S."
"Why Are We Cooperating with Tito?"
Tensions in the Middle East
"What Are We For?"
The Bay of Pigs and the Congo
"What Has Happened to the American Dream?"
The Cold War at Home: 1945--1963
Full Employment
Price Controls and Postwar Production
"Why I Do Not Choose to Run"
Loyalty Oaths
Taft-Hartley Act
Correspondence Regarding the Above Column
House Committee on Un-American Activities
"Plain Talk About Wallace"
"Liberals in This Year of Decision"
Dispute with Francis Cardinal Spellman
Correspondence Regarding the Above Column
Address to Americans for Democratic Action
"If I Were a Republican Today"
Senator Joseph McCarthy
Alger Hiss
"Social Responsibility for Individual Welfare"
Stevenson Campaign Address
Segregation in the South
The Smith Act
The Civil Rights Act of 1957
Stevenson on the Civil Rights Bill
Correspondence with Lyndon Johnson Regardomg the Above Column
"Ike--`Nice Man Poor Leader';Nixon--`Anything to Get Elected'"
"Why I Am Opposed to `Right to Work' Laws"
Statement on Behalf of t