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Interpreting the Self Two Hundred Years of American Autobiography

ISBN-10: 0226054489

ISBN-13: 9780226054483

Edition: N/A

Authors: Diane Bjorklund

List price: $30.00
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Description:

In this ambitious study, Diane Bjorklund explores the historical nature of self-narrative. Examining over 100 American autobiographers published in the last two centuries, she discusses not only well-known autobiographies such as Mark Twain and Andrew Carnegie but also many obscure ones such as a traveling book peddler, a minstrel, a hotel proprietress, an itinerant preacher, a West Point cadet, and a hoopskirt wire manufacturer. Bjorklund draws on the colorful stories of these autobiographers to show how their historical epoch shapes their understandings of self. "A refreshingly welcome approach to this intriguing topic. . . . [Bjorklund's] extensive and systematic approach to her source material is impressive and enriches our understanding of this essential subject."--Virginia Quarterly Review "Bjorklund studies both famous and obscure writers, and her clear prose style and copious quotations provide insight into the many aspects of the changing American self." --Library Journal
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Book details

List price: $30.00
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Publication date: 4/15/2000
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 278
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.25" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.836
Language: English

Joel Agee has translated numerous German authors into English, including Heinrich von Kleist, Rainer Maria Rilke, and Elias Canetti. In 2005 he received the Modern Language Association’s Lois Roth Award for his translation of Hans Erich Nossack’s The End: Hamburg 1943. � � � �

Prologue
Acknowledgments
Introduction Autobiographies as a Source of Data Organization of this Study
Autobiography as a Social Situation Interaction with an Audience
The Presentation of Self Telling a Story
The Self as Morality Play Historical Background
Theory of the Self Telling the Story
Conclusion
Masters of Fate Historical Background
Theory of the Self Telling the Story
Conclusion
The Uncertain Self Historical Background
Theory of the Self Telling the Story
Conclusion
The Beleaguered Self Historical Background
Theory of the Self Telling the Story
Some Contemporary Variations
Conclusion: The Autobiography as Moral Performance
Method
American Autobiographies: An Overview
Notes
Primary Sources
Bibliography Index