Skip to content

Specializing the Courts

Spend $50 to get a free DVD!

ISBN-10: 0226039552

ISBN-13: 9780226039558

Edition: 2011

Authors: Lawrence Baum

List price: $34.00
Blue ribbon 30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee!
Buy eBooks
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
Carrot Coin icon
XP icon
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Description:

Most Americans think that judges should be, and are, generalists who decide a wide array of cases. Nonetheless, we now have specialized courts in many key policy areas.Specializing the Courtsprovides the first comprehensive analysis of this growing trend toward specialization in the federal and state court systems. Lawrence Baum incisively explores the scope, causes, and consequences of judicial specialization in four areas that include most specialized courts: foreign policy and national security, criminal law, economic issues involving the government, and economic issues in the private sector. Baum examines the process by which court systems in the United States have become increasingly specialized and the motives that have led to the growth of specialization. He also considers the effects of judicial specialization on the work of the courts by demonstrating that under certain conditions, specialization can and does have fundamental effects on the policies that courts make. For this reason, the movement toward greater specialization constitutes a major change in the judiciary.
Customers also bought

Book details

List price: $34.00
Copyright year: 2011
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Publication date: 1/1/2011
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 296
Size: 5.75" wide x 8.75" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.836
Language: English

List of Tables
Preface
Acknowledgments
A First Look at Judicial Specialization
Questions to Address
Extent: The Landscape of Judicial Specialization
Plan of the Book
Appendix: The Scholarship on Judicial Specialization
Perspectives on Causes and Consequences
Consequences: The Impact of Judicial Specialization
Causes: The Sources of Judicial Specialization
Summing Up and Looking Ahead
Appendix: Research Strategy
Foreign Policy and Internal Security
Overseas Courts
Military Justice
The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Courts
The Removal Court
Discussion
Criminal Cases
Promoting Efficiency
Occasional Efforts to Attack Crime with Sanctions
Socialized Courts in the Progressive Era
Problem-solving Courts of the Current Era
Discussion
Economic Issues: Government Litigation
Revenue
Expenditures
Regulation
Discussion
Economic Issues: Private Litigation
Patents
Corporate Governance: The Delaware Courts
Business Courts
Bankruptcy
Discussion
Putting the Pieces Together
The Causes of Specialization
The Consequences of Specialization
Evaluating Judicial Specialization
The Future of Judicial Specialization
References
Index