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Just Business Arguments in Business Ethics

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ISBN-10: 0205697755

ISBN-13: 9780205697755

Edition: 2012 (Revised)

Authors: Martin Sandbu

List price: $61.49
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Book details

List price: $61.49
Copyright year: 2012
Publisher: Pearson Education, Limited
Publication date: 1/3/2011
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 224
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.00" long x 0.25" tall
Weight: 0.594
Language: English

Martin E. Sandbu is a Senior Fellow at the Zicklin Center for Business Ethics Research at the Wharton School, where he taught the main business ethics course in the undergraduate curriculum for several years. He is also the economics editorial writer for The Financial Times.Throughout his academic career, Sandbu has worked on questions at the intersection between economics, politics and philosophy. He holds degrees in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics from Balliol College, Oxford University, and in Political Economy and Government from Harvard University. His doctoral thesis, "Explorations in Process-Dependent Preference Theory," was published in both economics and philosophy journals.…    

Introduction: The Purpose of This Book
Acknowledgments
Support for Instructors and Students
The Business of Ethics: Reasoning about Right and Wrong
A famous ethical dilemma
Amoralism
Ethical subjectivism
Doing moral reasoning
Summary of the Argument in This Chapter
Two Extreme Views: Managing for Shareholders or Stakeholders?
The social responsibility of business is to increase its profits
Medicine for the people
Managing for "stakeholders"
Summary of the Argument in This Chapter
Doing One's Job Well: The Ethics of Social Roles
Ethics as playing one's role well
Goodness, practices, and the virtues
An Aristotelian approach to business ethics
Business life and its telos
Summary of the Argument in This Chapter
Roles and Conventions: Confronting Cultural Conflicts
Conventionalism
The relativist error
The limits of role-based ethics
Summary of the Argument in This Chapter
Ethics as Efficiency: Making Everyone Better Off
Consequentialist ethics
Utilitarianism
"Efficiency" and the Pareto criterion
Act- and rule-consequentialism
Summary of the Argument in This Chapter
Is Greed Good? Advancing Society through Selfish Action
As if by an invisible hand
Why the empirical premise is often false
Why the moral premise is false
Summary of the Argument in This Chapter
Consequentialist Complications: Sacrificing One for the Many
A trolley problem and a hospital case: two difficulties for utilitarianism
Fairness and welfarist consequentialism
Negative responsibility: Doing versus allowing
Directed obligations
Consequentialist retorts
Summary of the Argument in This Chapter
Self-Evident Truths? Imagining a World without Rights
Self-evident truths?
A world without rights
Taxonomy of rights
Examples of rights
Summary of the Argument in This Chapter
The Case for Rights: Justifying Right-Claims
Relativism again: The Asian values debate
Rights or "rights"?
Rights, dignity, and consent
Summary of the Argument in This Chapter
Ethics as Equal Freedom: Respecting Each Person's Dignity
The source of moral worth
Universalization as a source of duties
Autonomy as a source of rights
The Kantian company
The Kantian firm in the marketplace: Revisiting deception
Summary of the Argument in This Chapter
Fair Shares: Dividing the Value Added
A particular right-claim: fairness and executive compensation
The problem of "deservingness"
Utilitarianism as a theory of justice
Entitlements: Nozickian libertarianism
Just and unjust inequalities: Rawlsian social contract theory
Summary of the Argument in This Chapter
Just Business: Fulfilling Social Contracts
A social contract theory of business ethics
Rights revisited: Shareholders versus stakeholders
Relativism revisited: Social conventions and moral free space
Partial compliance theory
Conclusion
Summary of the Argument in This Chapter
Appendix: Suggestions for Supplementary Material
Index