Skip to content

What Is This Thing Called Happiness?

Spend $50 to get a free DVD!

ISBN-10: 0199645930

ISBN-13: 9780199645930

Edition: 2012

Authors: Fred Feldman

List price: $44.95
Shipping box This item qualifies for FREE shipping.
Blue ribbon 30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee!
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
Carrot Coin icon
XP icon
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Description:

According to an ancient and still popular view -- sometimes known as 'eudaimonism' -- a person's well-being, or quality of life, is ultimately determined by his or her level of happiness. According to this view, the happier a person is, the better off he is. The doctrine is controversial in part because the nature of happiness is controversial. InWhat Is This Thing Called Happiness?Fred Feldman presents a study of the nature and value of happiness. Part One contains critical discussions of the main philosophical and psychological theories of happiness. Feldman presents arguments designed to show that each of these theories is problematic. Part Two contains his presentation and defense of his own theory of happiness, which is a form of attitudinal hedonism. On this view, a person's level of happiness may be identified with the extent to which he or she takes pleasure in things. Feldman shows that if we understand happiness as he proposes, it becomes reasonable to suppose that a person's well-being is determined by his or her level of happiness. This view has important implications not only for moral philosophy, but also for the emerging field of hedonic psychology. Part Three contains discussions of some interactions between the proposed theory of happiness and empirical research into happiness.
Customers also bought

Book details

List price: $44.95
Copyright year: 2012
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Publication date: 3/20/2012
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 304
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.25" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 1.034
Language: English

Some Puzzles about Happiness
The Smile-Shaped Curve of Happiness
Troubles about Happiness
Why Worry about Happiness?
What's in This Book
Some Things That Happiness Isn�t
Sensory Hedonism about Happiness
Bentham, Mill, and Sidgwick on Happiness
Haybron on Hedonism about Happiness
Why Hedonism is False
Kahneman's "Objective Happiness"
Kahneman and "Instant Utility"
The Theory of Objective Happiness
The Intended Role of Objective Happiness
Problems with Kahneman's Theory
Subjective Local Preferentism about Happiness
Forms of Preferentism
Conceptual Background
Davis's Theory of Happiness
Problems for Davis's Form of Local Preferentism
A Paradox for Preferentism?
Whole Life Satisfaction Concepts of Happiness
A Surprising Book Title
Whole Life Satisfaction Theories of Happiness
Two Preliminary Problems
Some Distinctions and a Multitude of Concepts
Actualism and Hypotheticalism
Conclusion
Happiness and Time: More Nails in the Coffin of Whole Life Satisfactionism
Happiness =df. Whatever the Happiness Test Measures
What Happiness is
What is This Thing Called Happiness?
Where We Stand
A Crucial Distinction
Happiness at a Time, During an Interval, in a Domain, and in a Life
Wendell, Dolores, and the New Mother
The Meaning(s) of 'Happy'
Some Claims of Ambiguity
Quine on Ambiguity
Is 'Happy' Ambiguous?
Does 'Happy� Have Any of the Suggested Senses?
The Meaning of �Happy�
Attitudinal Hedonism about Happiness
The Problem of Objectless Moods
"The Missing Element"
In Praise of Shallow Happiness
Brett the Drag Racer
Susan the Pessimistic Student
Lois and the Dinosaurs
Tammy
Tristan and Bruce
The Philosopher
Summary
Eudaimonism
"Happiness is The Good"
Welfare, Well-Being, Quality of Life
Eudaimonism and Survival Strategies
The Fragmentation of Happiness
Five Grades of Demonic Possession
The Problem of Inauthentic Happiness
The Objection from Non-autonomous Values
Sumner on Authenticity
Problems for Sumner's Solution
Relevance to My Form of Eudaimonism
Disgusting Happiness
A Problem for Eudaimonism of all Forms
Avoiding Controversy
Our Authority over Our Own Happiness
Epistemic Authority
Controlling Authority over Happiness
Implications for the Empirical Study of Happiness
Measuring Happiness
Why Measure?
Satisfaction with Life and Its Domains
A Better Way to Measure Happiness
Review of Cases
Methodological Comments
Empirical Research; Philosophical Conclusions
Layard on the Reality of Happiness
The "Objective Reality" of Happiness
Happiness as a Natural Kind
Concluding Warnings, Clarifications, Disclaimers
The Central Points of the Project as a Whole
Bibliography
Index