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Hegel's Idea of Freedom

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ISBN-10: 0199251568

ISBN-13: 9780199251568

Edition: 2002

Authors: Alan Patten

List price: $62.00
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Description:

Alan Patten offers the first full-length treatment in English of Hegel's idea of freedom-his theory of what it is to be free and his account of the social and political contexts in which this freedom is developed, realized, and sustained. Freedom is the value that Hegel most greatly admired and the central organizing concept of his social philosophy. Patten's investigation illuminates and resolves a number of central questions concerning Hegel's ethics and political theory. Is Hegel's outlook unacceptably conservative? Can freedom be equated with rational self-determination? Is there any special connection between freedom and citizenship? By offering interpretations of Hegel's views on these and other questions, Patten develops an original 'civic humanist' reading of Hegel's social philosophy that restores to its proper, central place Hegel's idea of freedom. The book is written in a clear and jargon-free style and will be of interest to anyone concerned with Hegel's ethical, social, and political thought and the sources of contemporary ideas about freedom, community, and the state.
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Book details

List price: $62.00
Copyright year: 2002
Publisher: Oxford University Press, Incorporated
Publication date: 5/23/2002
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 230
Size: 5.75" wide x 8.75" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.594
Language: English

Alan Patten is professor of politics at Princeton University. He is the author of "Hegel's Idea of Freedom" and the editor of the journal "Philosophy & Public Affairs".

Introduction: Perspectives on Hegel's Idea of Freedom
Freedom as Rational Self-Determination
The Reciprocity Thesis in Kant and Hegel
Hegel and Social Contract Theory
Hegel's Justification of Private Property
A Civic Humanist Idea of Freedom
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index