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Mathematics of Sex How Biology and Society Conspire to Limit Talented Women and Girls

ISBN-10: 0195389395

ISBN-13: 9780195389395

Edition: 2009

Authors: Stephen J. Ceci, Wendy M. Williams

List price: $40.95
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Description:

Even though women consistently receive better grades in math and science, men excel on math aptitude tests and are greatly overrepresented in the so-called hard sciences. The Mathematics of Sex explores why males are overrepresented in mathematically intensive professions such as physics,computer science, chemistry, mathematics, and engineering. Bringing together for the first time important research from such diverse fields as endocrinology, economics, sociology, education, genetics, and psychology, the authors show that two factors - the parenting choices women (but not men) haveto make, and the tendency of bright women to choose people-oriented fields like medicine - largely account for the under-representation of women in the hard sciences. Further, research shows that biology itself - differences in hormones or brain organization - does not fully account for the problem.Compressing an enormous amount of information - over 400 studies - into a readable, engaging account suitable for parents, educators, and policymakers, this book advances the debate about women in science unlike any other book before it.
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Book details

List price: $40.95
Copyright year: 2009
Publisher: Oxford University Press, Incorporated
Publication date: 9/2/2009
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 288
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.50" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 1.188
Language: English

Preface: Setting the Stage
Introduction: Why care about women in science?
A multidimensional problem
Opening arguments: Environment
Opening arguments: Biology
Challenges to the environmental position
Challenges to the biological position
Background and trend data
Comparisons across societies, cultures, and developmental stages
Conclusions and synthesis
What next? Research and policy recommendations
Epilogue
Notes
About the authors
References
Index