Skip to content

Antigone

Spend $50 to get a free DVD!

ISBN-10: 0195061675

ISBN-13: 9780195061673

Edition: 1973

Authors: Sophocles, Richard Emil Braun, Richard Emil Braun

List price: $11.95
Blue ribbon 30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee!
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
Carrot Coin icon
XP icon
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Description:

Based on the conviction that only translators who write poetry themselves can properly recreate the celebrated and timeless tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, the Greek Tragedy in New Translations series offers new translations that go beyond the literal meaning of the Greek in order to evoke the poetry of the originals. The series seeks to recover the entire extant corpus of Greek tragedy, quite as though the ancient tragedians wrote in the English of our own time. Under the editorship of Peter Burian and Alan Shapiro, each of these three volumes, now available for the first time in paperback, includes a critical introduction, commentary on the text, full stage directions,…    
Customers also bought

Book details

List price: $11.95
Copyright year: 1973
Publisher: Oxford University Press, Incorporated
Publication date: 2/1/1990
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 126
Size: 5.50" wide x 8.00" long x 0.25" tall
Weight: 0.198

The Greek dramatist Sophocles, born to a wealthy family at Colonus, near Athens, was admired as a boy for his personal beauty and musical skill. He served faithfully as a treasurer and general for Athens when it was expanding its empire and influence. In the dramatic contests, he defeated Aeschylus in 468 b.c. for first prize in tragedy, wrote a poem to Herodotus (see Vol. 3), and led his chorus and actors in mourning for Euripides just a few months before his own death. He wrote approximately 123 plays, of which 7 tragedies are extant, as well as a fragment of his satiric play, Ichneutae (Hunters). His plays were produced in the following order: Ajax (c.450 b.c.), Antigone (441 b.c.),…    

Introduction
On the Translation
Antigone
Notes on the Text
Appendices
The Date of Antigone
The Myth of Antigone, to the End of the Fifth Century BCE
The Transmission of the Text
Glossary
Suggestions for Further Reading