Skip to content

Minding the Machines Preventing Technological Disasters

ISBN-10: 0130656461

ISBN-13: 9780130656469

Edition: 2002

Authors: William M. Evan, Mark Manion

List price: $29.99
Blue ribbon 30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee!
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
Carrot Coin icon
XP icon
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Description:

Technological disasters can impact every area of a corporation's infrastructure, not to mention its reputation and bottom line. This book explores today's best strategies -- organizational, professional, political and legal -- for reducing the incidence of technological catastrophe and mitigating its vast human cost. Technological breakthroughs have revolutionized our lives, but some of them have also led to catastrophe. In this book, two leading experts in technological risk assessment and mitigation analyze nearly three dozen disasters -- from Chernobyl to Challenger, the Bhopal gas leak to the Exxon Valdez oil spill. They present lessons learned and preventive strategies for all four leading causes of disaster: technical design, human factors, organizational system factors, and socio-cultural factors. They also identify appropriate preventive roles for every participant in technological systems, from corporations to individual citizens. For everyone concerned with the risks of technological disaster: educated laypeople, corporate executives, R&D professionals, practicing engineers and scientists, regulators, lawyers, policymakers, and many others.
Customers also bought

Book details

List price: $29.99
Copyright year: 2002
Publisher: Prentice Hall PTR
Publication date: 4/15/2002
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 512
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.00" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.694
Language: English

List of Tables
List of Figures
Preface
Invitation to Our Readers
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Technological Disasters: An Overview
Dangerous Technologies
Selected Examples of Technological Disasters
Causes of Technological Disasters
Strategies for Prevention
Who Should be Concerned?
Conclusion
References
Natural and Human-Made Disasters
Natural Disasters
Human-Made Disasters
Comparison of Natural and Human-Made Disasters
Conclusion
References
Endnote
The Prevalence of Technological Disasters
The Year 2000 (Y2K) Debacle: An Ironic Failure of Information Technology
The Overall Impact of Y2K
Anticipation of the Problem
The Causes of the Problem
The Scope of Y2K
The Costs of Y2K
Conclusion
References
Theories of Technological Disasters
A Systems Approach to Technological Disasters
Feedback Mechanisms and the Design of Engineering Systems
Perrow's Theory of "Normal Accidents" (NAT)
High Reliability Theory (HRT)
A Sociotechnical Systems Analysis of Technological Disasters
Conclusion
References
The Root Causes of Technological Disasters
Technical Design Factors
Human Factors
Organizational Systems Factors
Socio-Cultural Factors
Terrorism in the Nuclear-Information Age
Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism
Conclusion
References
Technological Disasters Since the Industrial Revolution
Three Industrial Revolutions and Beyond
Three Technological Revolutions
The First Industrial Revolution
The Second Industrial Revolution
The Third Industrial Revolution
A Fourth Industrial Revolution?
Conclusion
References
Endnotes
A Matrix of Technological Disasters
Testing Three Hypotheses about the History of Technological Disasters
Conclusion
References
Endnotes
Analysis of Case Studies of Technological Disasters
Twelve Exemplary Case Studies of Technological Disasters
USS Princeton Explosion
Titanic Sinking
Aisgill Train Wreck
Johnstown Flood
DC-10 Crash
Tenerife Runway Collision
Santa Barbara Oil Spill
Love Canal Toxic Waste Contamination
Apollo I Fire
Three Mile Island
Challenger Disaster
Bhopal Poison Gas Release
Lessons Learned From the Case Studies of Technological Disasters
Specific Lessons Learned
General Lessons Learned
Conclusion
References
Strategic Responses to Technological Disasters
The Responsibilities of Engineers and Scientists
The Role of Engineering Schools
The Role of Engineering Societies
The Role of Science and Scientists
Conclusion
References
The Role of Corporations in the Management of Technological Disasters
Corporate Management versus Mismanagement
Case Studies in Crisis Management
Crisis Management Theory
Conclusion
References
Endnote
The Role of the Legal System in Technology Policy Decisions
The Executive Branch
The Legislative Branch
The Administrative Branch
The Judicial Branch
The Legal Profession
Relative Effectiveness of U.S. Legal Subsystems in Technology Policy Decisions
Conclusion
References
Assessing the Risks of Technology
Probabilistic Risk Assessment
Risk-Cost-Benefit Analysis
Technology Assessment
Conclusion
References
Technology Decisions and the Democratic Process
Technocratic versus Democratic Assessments of Risk
Participatory Technology
Mechanisms for Citizen Participation
Toward an Alliance of Citizens' Organizations
Conclusion
References
Name Index
Subject Index