Physics and Philosophy The Revolution in Modern Science

ISBN-10: 0061209198

ISBN-13: 9780061209192

Edition: N/A

List price: $14.99 Buy it from $4.59
30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee

If an item you ordered from TextbookRush does not meet your expectations due to an error on our part, simply fill out a return request and then return it by mail within 30 days of ordering it for a full refund of item cost.

Learn more about our returns policy

Description:

The seminal work by one of the most important thinkers of the twentieth century, Physics and Philosophy is Werner Heisenberg's concise and accessible narrative of the revolution in modern physics, in which he played a towering role. The outgrowth of a celebrated lecture series, this book remains as relevant, provocative, and fascinating as when it was first published in 1958. A brilliant scientist whose ideas altered our perception of the universe, Heisenberg is considered the father of quantum physics; he is most famous for the Uncertainty Principle, which states that quantum particles do not occupy a fixed, measurable position. His contributions remain a cornerstone of contemporary physics theory and application.
Used Starting from $9.85
New Starting from $13.54
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
coins
coins
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!
Study Briefs

Limited time offer: Get the first one free! (?)

All the information you need in one place! Each Study Brief is a summary of one specific subject; facts, figures, and explanations to help you learn faster.

Add to cart
Study Briefs
Medical Terminology Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
Medical Math Online content $4.95 $1.99
Customers also bought
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading

Book details

List price: $14.99
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 5/8/2007
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 256
Size: 5.25" wide x 8.25" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.638
Language: English

Werner Heisenberg, a German physicist, is regarded as the founder of quantum mechanics, which describes atomic structure in mathematical terms. During the 1920s quantum theory became a controversial topic, following Niels Bohr's model proposal for the hydrogen atom. Heisenberg, dissatisfied with the prevalent mechanical models of the atom, conceived an abstract approach using matrix algebra. In 1925, Heisenberg, Max Born, and Pascual Jordan developed this approach into a theory they termed matrix mechanics. Unfortunately, the theory was difficult to understand, since it provided no means of visualizing the phenomena it explained. Erwin Schrodinger's wave formulation, proposed the following year, proved more successful. In 1944 Heisenberg's and Schrodinger's formulations were shown to be mathematically equivalent by John Von Neumann. In 1927 Heisenberg stated the uncertainty principle, for which he is best known. According to this principle, it is impossible to specify simultaneously both the position and the momentum of a particle, such as an electron. This is caused by interference with those quantities by the radiation that is used to make the observation. The uncertainty principle was demonstrated by means of a thought experiment rather than by a physical observation. Heisenberg also explained ferromagnetism, tracing it to an atomic structure. In 1932 he was awarded the Nobel Prize. Heisenberg was one of the few outstanding German physicists to remain in Germany during World War II. During the war he supervised atomic research in Germany, with the goal of constructing an atomic bomb, although he claimed not to be a supporter of the Nazi regime. Whether by intent or by circumstance, this effort proved to be unsuccessful, and contradictory statements by Heisenberg have not satisfactorily explained the outcome of the project. After the war, Heisenberg publicly declared that he would no longer take part in the production or testing of atomic weapons.

Introduction
An Old and a New Tradition
The History of Quantum Theory
The Copenhagen Interpretation of Quantum Theory
Quantum Theory and the Roots of Atomic Science
The Development of Philosophical Ideas Since Descartes in Comparison with the New Situation in Quantum Theory
The Relation of Quantum Theory to Other Parts of Natural Science
The Theory of Relativity
Criticism and Counterproposals to the Copenhagen Interpretation of Quantum Theory
Quantum Theory and the Structure of Matter
Language and Reality in Modern Physics
The Role of Modern Physics in the Present Development of Human Thinking
Nobel Lecture: The Development of Quantum Mechanics
×
Free shipping on orders over $35*

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

Learn more about the TextbookRush Marketplace.

×