Madison - Writings

ISBN-10: 1883011663

ISBN-13: 9781883011666

Edition: N/A

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Book details

List price: $40.00
Publisher: Library of America, The
Publication date: 8/30/1999
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 966
Size: 5.25" wide x 8.50" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 1.342
Language: English

James Madison, the fourth president of the United States, was born at Port Conway, Virginia. He was raised on a large family farm, called Montpelier, which remained his home throughout his life. After receiving a boarding school education, he entered the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), from which he graduated in 1771. In 1776, Madison was elected a delegate to the Virginia Revolutionary Convention, where he was a strong advocate of religious freedom. He then became a Virginia legislator. As delegate to the Constitutional Convention of 1787, he became the chief architect of the U.S. Constitution and, later, of the Bill of Rights. Madison served in the first Congress from 1789 to 1797, rising to the position of Speaker of the House. In 1801, he became Secretary of State in the administration of Thomas Jefferson, and in 1809, he was elected president. Madison's insights on the nature of politics and the operations of government are as relevant today as they were in his time. His journals provide our principal source of knowledge about the Constitutional Convention of 1787. He also shared the authorship of "The Federalist Papers" (1787-88), arguably the most significant American contribution to political theory, with Alexander Hamilton and John Jay. His insights into political behavior (such as Federalist paper number 10 on the subject of factions) and the nature of government (Federalist papers numbers 39 and 51 on the allocation of power) continue to be useful for those who seek to write constitutions for new governments today.

Jack N. Rakove is the William R. Coe Professor of History and American Studies and Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and author of the Pulitzer Prize�e"winning Original Meanings: Politics and Ideas in the Making of the Constitution.

The Revolution and the Confederation, 1772-1787
To William Bradford, November 9, 1772
To William Bradford, January 24, 1774
To William Bradford, April 1, 1774
Amendments to the Virginia Declaration of Rights, May 29-June 11, 1776
To Thomas Jefferson, March 27, 1780
To Thomas Jefferson, April 16, 1781
Observations on State Territorial Claims, May 1, 1782
Memorandum on Conversation Regarding the Continental Army, February 20, 1783
Speech in the Continental Congress on Revenue, February 21, 1783
To Edmund Randolph, May 1783
To Lafayette, March 20, 1785
Memorial and Remonstrance Against Religious Assessments, c. June 20, 1785
To James Monroe, August 7, 1785
To Caleb Wallace, August 23, 1785
To George Washington, December 9, 1785
To James Monroe, March 19, 1786
To Thomas Jefferson, August 12, 1786
To James Monroe, September 11, 1786
To George Washington, December 7, 1786
To Edmund Pendleton, February 24, 1787
To Thomas Jefferson, March 19, 1787
Vices of the Political System of the United States, April 1787
To George Washington, April 16, 1787
Framing and Ratifying the Constitution, 1787-1789
The Virginia Plan, May 29, 1787
Speech in the Federal Convention on Factions, June 6, 1787
Speech in the Federal Convention on the Revisionary Power, June 6, 1787
To Thomas Jefferson, June 6, 1787
Remarks in the Federal Convention on the Senate, June 7, 1787
Remarks in the Federal Convention on the Power to Negative State Laws, June 8, 1787
Speech in the Federal Convention on the New Jersey Plan, June 19, 1787
Speech in the Federal Convention on the General and State Governments, June 21, 1787
Speech in the Federal Convention on the Senate, June 26, 1787
Speech in the Federal Convention on Relations Among the States, June 28, 1787
Speech in the Federal Convention on the Danger of Dissolution, June 29, 1787
Speech in the Federal Convention on Divisions Between the States, June 30, 1787
Speech in the Federal Convention on the Proposed Compromise on State Representation, July 5, 1787
Speech in the Federal Convention on Apportioning Representation, July 11, 1787
Speech in the Federal Convention Opposing Equal Representation in the Senate, July 14, 1787
Remarks in the Federal Convention on Electing the Executive, July 17, 1787
Speech in the Federal Convention on Electing the Executive, July 19, 1787
Speech in the Federal Convention on Impeachment, July 20, 1787
Speech in the Federal Convention on Ratification, July 23, 1787
Speech in the Federal Convention on Electing the Executive, July 25, 1787
Speech in the Federal Convention on Suffrage, August 7, 1787
Speech in the Federal Convention on Control of Congressional Elections, August 9, 1787
To Thomas Jefferson, September 6, 1787
To George Washington, September 30, 1787
To George Washington, October 18, 1787
To Thomas Jefferson, October 24, 1787
To George Washington, November 18, 1787
The Federalist No. 10, November 22, 1787
The Federalist No. 14, November 30, 1787
The Federalist No. 18, December 7, 1787
The Federalist No. 19, December 8, 1787
The Federalist No. 20, December 11, 1787
To Edmund Randolph, January 10, 1788
The Federalist No. 37, January 11, 1788
The Federalist No. 38, January 12, 1788
The Federalist No. 39, January 16, 1788
The Federalist No. 40, January 18, 1788
The Federalist No. 41, January 19, 1788
The Federalist No. 42, January 22, 1788
The Federalist No. 43, January 23, 1788
The Federalist No. 44, January 25, 1788
The Federalist No. 45, January 26, 1788
The Federalist No. 46, January 29, 1788
The Federalist No. 47, January 30, 1788
The Federalist No. 48, February 1, 1788
The Federalist No. 49, February 2, 1788
The Federalist No. 50, February 5, 1788
The Federalist No. 51, February 6, 1788
The Federalist No. 52, February 8, 1788
The Federalist No. 53, February 9, 1788
The Federalist No. 54, February 12, 1788
The Federalist No. 55, February 13, 1788
The Federalist No. 56, February 16, 1788
The Federalist No. 57, February 19, 1788
The Federalist No. 58, February 20, 1788
The Federalist No. 62, February 27, 1788
The Federalist No. 63, March 1, 1788
To Eliza House Trist, March 25, 1788
Speech in the Virginia Ratifying Convention in Defense of the Constitution, June 6, 1788
Speech in the Virginia Ratifying Convention on Direct Taxation, June 11, 1788
Speech in the Virginia Ratifying Convention on Taxation, a Bill of Rights, and the Mississippi, June 12, 1788
Speech in the Virginia Ratifying Convention on the Militia, June 14, 1788
Speech in the Virginia Ratifying Convention on Control of the Military, June 16, 1788
Speech in the Virginia Ratifying Convention on the Slave Trade Clause, June 17, 1788
Speech in the Virginia Ratifying Convention on the Judicial Power, June 20, 1788
Speech in the Virginia Ratifying Convention on Ratification and Amendments, June 24, 1788
To Alexander Hamilton, June 27, 1788
To Alexander Hamilton, July 20, 1788
Observations on the "Draught of a Constitution for Virginia," c. October 15, 1788
To Thomas Jefferson, October 17, 1788
To Edmund Randolph, November 2, 1788
To Edmund Randolph, November 23, 1788
To George Eve, January 2, 1789
To Edmund Randolph, March 1, 1789
Congress and the Republican Opposition, 1789-1801
Speech in Congress on Presidential Titles, May 11, 1789
Speech in Congress on the Removal Power, May 19, 1789
Speech in Congress Proposing Constitutional Amendments, June 8, 1789
Speech in Congress on Presidential Removal Power, June 16, 17, 1789
To Edmund Pendleton, June 21, 1789
Remarks in Congress on Proposed Constitutional Amendments, August 15, 1789
Remarks in Congress on the "Most Valuable Amendment," August 17, 1789
To Richard Peters, August 19, 1789
Memorandum on Colonizing Freed Slaves, c. October 20, 1789
To Thomas Jefferson, February 4, 1790
To Benjamin Rush, March 20, 1790
Remarks in Congress During Debate on Militia Bill, December 16, 1790
Speech in Congress on Religious Exemptions from Militia Duty, December 22, 1790
Speech in Congress Opposing the National Bank, February 2, 1791
To Thomas Jefferson, May 12, 1791
Population and Emigration, National Gazette, November 21, 1791
Consolidation, National Gazette, December 5, 1791
Dependent Territories, National Gazette, December 12, 1791
Public Opinion, National Gazette, December 19, 1791
Government, National Gazette, January 2, 1792
Charters, National Gazette, January 19, 1792
Parties, National Gazette, January 23, 1792
Universal Peace, National Gazette, February 2, 1792
Government of the United States, National Gazette, February 6, 1792
Spirit of Governments, National Gazette, February 20, 1792
Republican Distribution of Citizens, National Gazette, March 5, 1792
Fashion, National Gazette, March 22, 1792
Property, National Gazette, March 29, 1792
The Union: Who Are Its Real Friends?, National Gazette, April 2, 1792
Memorandum on Washington's Retirement, May 1792
To George Washington, June 20, 1792
A Candid State of Parties, National Gazette, September 26, 1792
Who Are the Best Keepers of the People's Liberties?, National Gazette, December 22, 1792
To Thomas Jefferson, June 13, 1793
"Helvidius" No. 1, August 24, 1793
To Thomas Jefferson, September 2, 1793
To Dolley Payne Todd, August 18, 1794
Speech in Congress on "Self-Created Societies," November 27, 1794
To James Monroe, December 20, 1795
Speech in Congress on the Jay Treaty, March 10, 1796
Speech in Congress on the Jay Treaty, April 6, 1796
To Thomas Jefferson, December 19, 1796
To Thomas Jefferson, January 15, 1797
To Thomas Jefferson, c. February 18, 1798
To Thomas Jefferson, April 2, 1798
To Thomas Jefferson, May 13, 1798
Virginia Resolutions Against the Alien and Sedition Acts, December 21, 1798
To Thomas Jefferson, December 29, 1798
Foreign Influence, Aurora General Advertiser, January 23, 1799
Political Reflections, Aurora General Advertiser, February 23, 1799
Report on the Alien and Sedition Acts, January 7, 1800
To Thomas Jefferson, January 10, 1801
Secretary of State and President, 1801-1817
To Robert R. Livingston and James Monroe, July 29, 1803
To James Monroe, July 6, 1807
First Inaugural Address, March 4, 1809
Veto Message to Congress, February 21, 1811
To Thomas Jefferson, May 25, 1812
War Message to Congress, June 1, 1812
Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1813
To John Nicholas, April 2, 1813
To John Armstrong, August 13, 1814
Memorandum on the Battle of Bladensburg, c. August 24, 1814
Memorandum on Armstrong's Resignation, August 29, 1814
To Wilson Cary Nicholas, November 26, 1814
Message to Congress on Peace Treaty, February 18, 1815
Seventh Annual Message to Congress, December 5, 1815
Veto Message to Congress, March 3, 1817
Retirement, 1817-1836
To Robert Walsh, March 2, 1819
To Robert J. Evans, June 15, 1819
To Spencer Roane, September 2, 1819
To Robert Walsh, November 27, 1819
Detached Memoranda, 1819?
To James Monroe, February 10, 1820
To Spencer Roane, May 6, 1821
To Spencer Roane, June 29, 1821
Jonathan Bull and Mary Bull, c. 1821
To Edward Livingston, July 10, 1822
To William T. Barry, August 4, 1822
To Edward Everett, March 19, 1823
To Thomas Jefferson, June 27, 1823
To Henry Lee, June 25, 1824
To Peter S. DuPonceau, August 1824
To Thomas Jefferson, February 8, 1825
To Thomas Jefferson, February 24, 1826
To Nicholas P. Trist, July 6, 1826
To Henry Colman, August 25, 1826
To Joseph Cabell, September 18, 1828
Speech in the Virginia Constitutional Convention, December 2, 1829
A Sketch Never Finished Nor Applied, 1830?
To Edward Everett, August 28, 1830
To James Robertson, March 27, 1831
To Jared Sparks, April 8, 1831
To Jared Sparks, June 1, 1831
To Mathew Carey, July 27, 1831
To Nicholas P. Trist, May 1832
To Andrew Stevenson, November 20, 1832
To Nicholas P. Trist, December 23, 1832
To William Cabell Rives, March 12, 1833
Advice to My Country, 1834
To George Tucker, June 27, 1836
The Constitution
Chronology
Note on the Texts
Notes
Index
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