Public Opinion Democratic Ideals, Democtratic Practice

ISBN-10: 1608717968
ISBN-13: 9781608717965
Edition: 2nd 2013 (Revised)
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Description: In this revision to their lauded core text, Clawson and Oxley continue to link the enduring normative questions of democratic theory to existing empirical research on public opinion. Exploring the tension between ideals and their practice, each  More...

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Book details

List price: $80.00
Edition: 2nd
Copyright year: 2013
Publisher: CQ Press
Publication date: 2/28/2012
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 472
Size: 5.75" wide x 8.75" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.628
Language: English

In this revision to their lauded core text, Clawson and Oxley continue to link the enduring normative questions of democratic theory to existing empirical research on public opinion. Exploring the tension between ideals and their practice, each chapter focuses on a handful of exemplary studies so students gain a richer understanding of the research process and see methods applied in context. With new scholarship and data throughout, this second edition includes substantial new material on the critical role of groups in shaping public opinion, as well as recent developments in U.S. politics, such as public evaluations of President Obama, the power of new media, the rise of the Tea Party movement, and more.

Zoe M. Oxley is associate professor of political science at Union College. Her research interests include media coverage of politics, the effects of the media on public opinion, women in electoral politics, and political psychology. Her work has been published in the American Political Science Review, Journal of Politics, Political Research Quarterly, Politics & Gender, and PS: Political Science and Politics.

Tables, Figures, and Features
Preface
What Should the Role of Citizens Be in a Democratic Society?
Public Opinion in a Democracy
Theories of Democracy
What is Public Opinion?
Defining Key Concepts
Empirical Assessments of Public Opinion
Themes of the Book
Key Concepts
Suggested Sources for Further Reading
Appendix. Studying Public Opinion Empirically
Public Opinion Surveys
Experiments
Interviews
Focus Groups
Content Analysis
Conclusion
Key Concepts
Suggested Sources for Further Reading
Are Citizens Pliable?
Political Socialization
Childhood Socialization
Parental Transmission of Political Attitudes
Political Events and Socialization
Genetic Inheritance of Political Attitudes
Conclusion
Key Concepts
Suggested Sources for Further Reading
Mass Media
What Should Citizens Expect from the Mass Media in a Democracy?
What General Characteristics of the Mass Media Shape News Coverage?
What Specific Characteristics of the News Media Shape the Reporting of Political Events?
Are Citizens Affected by the Mass Media?
Conclusion
Key Concepts
Suggested Sources for Further Reading
Attitude Stability and Attitude Change
Are Americans' Attitudes Stable?
Collective Attitude Stability
Presidential Approval
Psychological Approaches to Attitudes
Conclusion
Key Concepts
Suggested Sources for Further Reading
Do Citizens Organize Their Political Thinking?
Ideological Innocence and Critiques
Converse's Claim: Ideological Innocence
Critiques of Converse
Related Evidence?
Conclusion
Key Concepts
Suggested Sources for Further Reading
Pluralistic Roots of Public Opinion: Personality, Self-interest, Values, and History
Personality
Self-Interest
Values
Historical Events
Conclusion
Key Concepts
Suggested Sources for Further Reading
Pluralistic Roots of Public Opinion: The Central Role of Groups
Party Identification
Race and Public Opinion
Gender and Public Opinion
Conclusion
Key Concepts
Suggested Sources for Further Reading
Do Citizens Endorse and Demonstrate Democratic Basics?
Knowledge, Interest, and Attention to Politics
How Knowledgeable, Interested, and Attentive Should Citizens Be in a Democracy?
Are Citizens Knowledgeable about Politics?
Measuring Political Knowledge
Why Are Some Citizens More Knowledgeable than Others?
What Are the Consequences of Political Knowledge?
Are Citizens Interested in and Attentive to Politics?
Conclusion
Key Concepts
Suggested Sources for Further Reading
Support for Civil Liberties
Are Americans Tolerant?
Sources of Tolerant Attitudes
Contextual Influences on Tolerance Judgments
Are Elites More Tolerant?
Civil Liberties Post-9/11
Conclusion
Key Concepts
Suggested Sources for Further Reading
Support for Civil Rights
Public Opinion and Presidential Candidates
Support for Civil Rights Policies
Conclusion
Key Concepts
Suggested Sources for Further Reading
What Is the Relationship between Citizens and Their Government?
Trust in Government, Support for Institutions, and Social Capital
Trust in Government
Support for Institutions
Social Capital
Conclusion
Key Concepts
Suggested Sources for Further Reading
Impact of Public Opinion on Policy
Should Public Opinion Influence Policy?
Is Public Opinion Related to Policy?
Do Politicians Follow or Lead the Public?
Public Opinion and Foreign Policy
Conclusion
Key Concepts
Suggested Sources for Further Reading
What Do We Make of Public Opinion in a Democracy?
Conclusion
What Should the Role of Citizens Be in a Democratic Society?
Are Citizens Pliable?
Do Citizens Organize Their Political Thinking?
Do Citizens Endorse and Demonstrate Democratic Basics?
What Is the Relationship between Citizens and Their Government?
What Do We Make of Public Opinion in a Democracy?
Notes
Glossary
Index

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