Christianity and Democracy, and the Rights of Man and Natural Law

ISBN-10: 1586176005
ISBN-13: 9781586176006
Edition: 2012
Authors: Jacques Maritain
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Description: Few political philosophers have laid such stress upon the organic and dynamic characters of human rights, rooted as they are in natural law, as did the great 20th century philosopher, Jacques Maritain. Few Christian scholars have placed such  More...

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Book details

Copyright year: 2012
Publisher: Ignatius Press
Publication date: 1/16/2012
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 195
Size: 5.00" wide x 8.25" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.550
Language: English

Few political philosophers have laid such stress upon the organic and dynamic characters of human rights, rooted as they are in natural law, as did the great 20th century philosopher, Jacques Maritain. Few Christian scholars have placed such emphasis upon the influence of evangelical inspiration, or of the Gospel message, upon the temporal order as has Maritain.As this important work reveals, the philosophy of Jacques Maritain on natural law and human rights is complemented by and can only be properly understood in the light of his teaching on Christianity and democracy and their relationship. Maritain takes pains to point out that Christianity cannot be made subservient to any political form or regime, that democracy is linked to Christianity and not the other way around, and that every just regime, such as the classic forms of monarchy, aristocracy and republic, is compatible with Christianity and in it a person is able to achieve some measure of fulfillment even in the temporal order.At the same time he argues his distinctive thesis that personalist or organic democracy provides a fuller measure of freedom and fulfillment and that it emerges or begins to take shape under the inspiration of the Gospel. Even the modern democracies we do in fact have, with all their weaknesses, represent an historic gain for the person and they spring, he urges, from the very Gospel they so wantonly repudiate

T. S. Eliot once called Jacques Maritain "the most conspicuous figure and probably the most powerful force in contemporary philosophy." His wife and devoted intellectual companion, Raissa Maritain, was of Jewish descent but joined the Catholic church with him in 1906. Maritain studied under Henri Bergson but was dissatisfied with his teacher's philosophy, eventually finding certainty in the system of St. Thomas Aquinas. He lectured widely in Europe and in North and South America, and lived and taught in New York during World War II. Appointed French ambassador to the Vatican in 1945, he resigned in 1948 to teach philosophy at Princeton University, where he remained until his retirement in 1953. He was prominent in the Catholic intellectual resurgence, with a keen perception of modern French literature. Although Maritain regarded metaphysics as central to civilization and metaphysically his position was Thomism, he took full measure of the intellectual currents of his time and articulated a resilient and vital Thomism, applying the principles of scholasticism to contemporary issues. In 1963, Maritain was honored by the French literary world with the national Grand Prize for letters. He learned of the award at his retreat in a small monastery near Toulouse where he had been living in ascetic retirement for some years. In 1967, the publication of "The Peasant of the Garonne" disturbed the French Roman Catholic world. In it, Maritain attacked the "neo-modernism" that he had seen developing in the church in recent decades, especially since the Second Vatican Council. According to Jaroslav Pelikan, writing in the Saturday Review of Literature, "He laments that in avant-garde Roman Catholic theology today he can 'read nothing about the redeeming sacrifice or the merits of the Passion.' In his interpretation, the whole of the Christian tradition has identified redemption with the sacrifice of the cross. But now, all of that is being discarded, along with the idea of hell, the doctrine of creation out of nothing, the infancy narratives of the Gospels, and belief in the immortality of the human soul." Maritain's wife, Raissa, also distinguished herself as a philosophical author and poet. The project of publishing Oeuvres Completes of Jacques and Raissa Maritain has been in progress since 1982, with seven volumes now in print.

Foreword
Introduction
Christianity and Democracy
Preface
The End of an Age
The Tragedy of the Democracies
Three Remarks
Evangelical Inspiration and the Secular Conscience
The True Essence of Democracy
The New Leadership
The Communist Problem
An Heroic Humanism
The Rights of Man and Natural Law
A Society of Human Persons
The Human Person
The Person and Society
The Common Good
Totalitarianism and Personalism
The Movement of Persons within Social Life
Four Characteristics of a Society of Free Men
A Vitally Christian Society
The Movement of Societies within Time
The Conquest of Freedom
The Common Task
The Internal Progress of Human Life Itself
The Rights of the Person
Political Humanism
Animality and Personality
Natural Law
Natural Law and Human Rights
Natural Law, Law of Nations, Positive Law
The Rights of the Human Person
The Rights of the Civic Person
The Rights of the Working Person
R�sum� of the Rights Enumerated
Appendix
Index of Persons

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