Pathways to Independence Reading, Writing, and Learning in Grades 3-8

ISBN-10: 1572306475
ISBN-13: 9781572306479
Edition: 2003
List price: $43.00
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Description: This is a theoretically based yet pragmatic guide to the intricacies of teaching students who may have acquired the basic skills of reading and writing but have yet to develop into skilful, willful, mature readers.

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Book details

List price: $43.00
Copyright year: 2003
Publisher: Guilford Publications
Publication date: 4/20/2001
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 345
Size: 7.00" wide x 9.75" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 1.694
Language: English

This is a theoretically based yet pragmatic guide to the intricacies of teaching students who may have acquired the basic skills of reading and writing but have yet to develop into skilful, willful, mature readers.

Michael Ruse is the Lucyle T. Werkmeister Professor of Philosophy and director of the Program in the History and Philosophy of Science at Florida State University. He is the author or editor of nearly thirty books.Jo Worthy, PhD, is Associate Professor of Reading Education and Teacher Education at the University of Texas at Austin, where she teaches graduate and undergraduate practicum courses in reading methods and reading difficulties in addition to courses on reading and language arts research. After receiving her bachelor's degree and teaching certificate in early childhood education, Dr. Worthy taught for many years in Virginia public elementary and middle schools. She continues to spend most of her time in public schools, collaborating closely with teachers, teaching her classes on an elementary school campus, and directing a literacy tutoring program. Dr. Worthy earned her doctorate in 1989 from the University of Virginia in reading education, focusing on educational research, clinical assessment, and children's literature. From 1991 to 1994, as a postdoctoral fellow at the Learning Research and Development Center with Isabel Beck and Margaret McKeown, she researched text comprehension and engagement. Her current research and teaching interests include teacher education, students' reading preferences, and reading difficulties, with a focus on grades 1-6. Karen Broaddus, PhD, is Associate Professor of Reading Education at James Madison University. Her background experiences include teaching middle and secondary English and working as a children's librarian in school and public library settings. Dr. Broaddus received her doctorate from the University of Virginia in 1995, focusing her studies on reading, English education, and assessment. She began her college career at the University of Tulsa in Oklahoma, teaching children's literature, multicultural studies in adolescent literature, language arts, and literacy assessment and intervention. In Tulsa city schools, Dr. Broaddus collaborated with preservice teachers in group research projects on children's responses to multiethnic literature and in individual case study projects on struggling readers. Since her appointment to the faculty at James Madison University in 1998, she has focused her teaching and research on reading, writing, and content area learning in the middle grades. Gay Ivey, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Reading Education at the University of Maryland at College Park. She began her teaching career in Albemarle County, Virginia, where she was a middle school Title I reading/language arts teacher. Dr. Ivey received her master's degree from the University of Virginia in 1990 and her doctorate from the University of Georgia in 1997. Her first university position was at the Graduate School of Education at Rutgers University before moving to the University of Maryland in 1999. She teaches courses in reading instruction and assessment. Her research interests include examining ways to make regular classroom instruction more responsive to individual development and motivation in the upper elementary and middle grades, especially for students who find reading and writing difficult.

Jo Worthy, PhD, is Associate Professor of Reading Education and Teacher Education at the University of Texas at Austin, where she teaches graduate and undergraduate practicum courses in reading methods and reading difficulties in addition to courses on reading and language arts research. After receiving her bachelor's degree and teaching certificate in early childhood education, Dr. Worthy taught for many years in Virginia public elementary and middle schools. She continues to spend most of her time in public schools, collaborating closely with teachers, teaching her classes on an elementary school campus, and directing a literacy tutoring program. Dr. Worthy earned her doctorate in 1989 from the University of Virginia in reading education, focusing on educational research, clinical assessment, and children's literature. From 1991 to 1994, as a postdoctoral fellow at the Learning Research and Development Center with Isabel Beck and Margaret McKeown, she researched text comprehension and engagement. Her current research and teaching interests include teacher education, students' reading preferences, and reading difficulties, with a focus on grades 1-6. Karen Broaddus, PhD, is Associate Professor of Reading Education at James Madison University. Her background experiences include teaching middle and secondary English and working as a children's librarian in school and public library settings. Dr. Broaddus received her doctorate from the University of Virginia in 1995, focusing her studies on reading, English education, and assessment. She began her college career at the University of Tulsa in Oklahoma, teaching children's literature, multicultural studies in adolescent literature, language arts, and literacy assessment and intervention. In Tulsa city schools, Dr. Broaddus collaborated with preservice teachers in group research projects on children's responses to multiethnic literature and in individual case study projects on struggling readers. Since her appointment to the faculty at James Madison University in 1998, she has focused her teaching and research on reading, writing, and content area learning in the middle grades. Gay Ivey, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Reading Education at the University of Maryland at College Park. She began her teaching career in Albemarle County, Virginia, where she was a middle school Title I reading/language arts teacher. Dr. Ivey received her master's degree from the University of Virginia in 1990 and her doctorate from the University of Georgia in 1997. Her first university position was at the Graduate School of Education at Rutgers University before moving to the University of Maryland in 1999. She teaches courses in reading instruction and assessment. Her research interests include examining ways to make regular classroom instruction more responsive to individual development and motivation in the upper elementary and middle grades, especially for students who find reading and writing difficult.

Introduction: Understanding Students in the Middle Grades (3-8)
Personal and Social Issues That Affect Education for Students in the Middle Grades
A Guide to This Book
Getting Ready for the School Year: Assessment and Materials
Assessment: Getting to Know Students as People and Learners
What Is Assessment and Why Is It Important?
Getting to Know Students as People
Getting to Know Students as Learners
Issues in Choosing Appropriate Books
Analyzing Students' Reading
Continual Assessments during Classroom Instruction
What Students Read and How to Get It
Building a Classroom Collection to Support Learning and Engagement
Other Important Features of a Well-Balanced Classroom Collection
Books That "Fit": Guiding Students in Choosing Appropriate Books
The Hardest Part: Acquiring Materials for Classroom Collections
Reading and Writing Instruction
Reading Aloud to Students
Why Read Aloud in the Middle Grades?
Exposing Students to a Variety of Topics and Genres by Reading Aloud
Promoting Engagement in Reading through Reading Aloud
Giving Students Access to Texts They Cannot Yet Read on Their Own
Creating a Context for Sharing Expertise about Reading and Writing
Providing Opportunities for Personal Response, Discussion, and Inquiry
Making Time for Reading Aloud
Just Reading
Why Prioritize Independent, Self-Selected Reading?
The Importance of Self-Selection: What Students Read on Their Own
Independent Reading in the Content Areas
What Teachers Do during Reading Time: Supporting, Teaching, and Assessing
Building Reading Fluency
What Is Fluency and Why Is It Important?
Elementary and Middle School Classrooms That Foster Reading Fluency
Why Some Students Don't Develop Adequate Fluency
Traditional Fluency Instruction
Purposeful Instruction That Targets Fluency Development
Assessing Fluency
Epilogue
Guiding Students to Read as Writers
Tapping Personal Experience as a Source for Writing
Thinking as an Author: Using Models from Literature
Engagement and Writing: Developing Independence
Exploring Words
Encouraging Language Play
When Do I Teach Grammar?
What about Spelling?
Using Students' Knowledge about Words to Guide Instruction
Guiding Students to Act as Researchers
Why Focus on Research?
Learning about the Research Process
Setting Up Clear Steps for Research and the Writing Process
Revisiting the Topic of Engagement in Research
Tailoring Instruction for Individual Students
Meeting Students' Needs in the Regular Instructional Program
Extra Assistance for Students Who Struggle
Current Views on Students Who Struggle in Literacy
School Programs for Students Who Struggle in Literacy
Instruction in Remedial and Special Education Programs
What Kinds of Instruction Do Struggling Learners Need?
A Plan for Meeting the Needs of Struggling Learners
Exploring Options for Additional Assistance
Learning More about Helping Struggling Learners
Appendices
Graphic Organizers for Reading and Writing
Forms and Record Keeping
Literature for Children and Adolescents
Resources for Teaching Reading and Writing
Charles: A Case Study of a Less Skilled Reader in the Middle Grades
Index

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