Martin and Malcolm and America A Dream of a Nightmare

ISBN-10: 1570759790
ISBN-13: 9781570759796
Edition: 20th 2012
Authors: James H. Cone
List price: $26.00 Buy it from $20.81
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Description: James Cone cuts through the superficial assessments of King and Malcolm as polar opposites to reveal two men whose visions were complementary and moving towards convergence.

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Book details

List price: $26.00
Edition: 20th
Copyright year: 2012
Publisher: Orbis Books
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 392
Size: 5.75" wide x 9.50" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.650
Language: English

James Cone cuts through the superficial assessments of King and Malcolm as polar opposites to reveal two men whose visions were complementary and moving towards convergence.

A leading African American theologian and an advocate of black theology, James H. Cone was born in Fordyce, Arkansas. Cone came of age during the civil rights movement and he was drawn to the black power movement that gained prominence in the late 1960s. Rejecting the nonviolence of Martin Luther King, Jr., Cone moved to join theology with the militant, separatist vision of Malcolm X, with its espousal of forceful societal change to achieve racial equality. Cone's book Black Theology and Black Power (1969) eloquently equated black power with the political and spiritual liberation of black Americans. In it, he equated blackness as symbolic of oppression and whiteness as symbolic of the oppressors. Cone continued his teachings of what soon became known as "black theology" in a second book, A Black Theology of Liberation (1971), which strongly condemned racism and oppression. During the 1970s, Cone became a force in the development of liberation theologies in Third World countries. Beginning in 1976, he became an important figure in the Ecumenical Association of Third World Theologians. Cone's association with liberation theologies also broadened and transformed his vision of Christian theology. In Crosscurrents, published in 1977, he strongly articulated the view that Christian theology must move beyond reaction to white racism in America. Cone joined the faculty of Union Theological Seminary in 1969 and was appointed to the distinguished Charles A. Biggs chair of systematic theology in 1977.

Preface to the Twentieth Anniversity Edition
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction. America: A Dream or a Nightmare?
The Meeting of Malcolm and Martin
Integrationism and Nationalism in African-American Intellectual History
The Making of a Dreamer (1929-55)
The Making of a "Bad Nigger" (1925-52)
"I Have a Dream" (1955-64)
The Context of Martin's Vision
King and the American Dream
Pursuing the Dream: The Role of the Negro People
The American Dream and the Dream for the World
Birmingham and the March on Washington
After Washington
"I See a Nightmare" (1952-63)
The Context of Malcolm's Vision
Malcolm and Muhammad
Oppression and Justice
Unity, Self-knowledge, Self-love, Self-defense, and Separation
America as a Nightmare
"We Must Love Our White Brothers"
The Impact of King's Faith and Theology upon His Dream
King's Impact upon the American Churches
"White Man's Heaven is a Black Man's Hell"
The Impact of Malcolm's Faith and Theology upon His Nightmare
Malcolm's Exposition of Religions and Race
"Chickens Coming Home to Roost" (1964-65)
Break with Elijah Muhammad
Movement toward Martin
"Shattered Dreams" (1965-68)
The Struggle for the Ballot: End of the First Phase
The Second Phase: A Dream Shattered
Disenchantment with Whites
The Vietnam Crucible: Justice, Love, and Hope
Two Roads to Freedom
Complementing Each Other
Correcting Each Other
Nothing But Men
Sexism
Classism
Making Their Mark: Legacies
Culture
Politics
Critique of American Christianity
Qualities as Leaders
Self-criticism and Humility
Nonviolence and Self-defense
Militancy and Humor
Solidarity with the Masses
Link with Other Liberation Movements
Conclusion
Abbreviations
Notes
Index

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