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How Hawaii Changed America

ISBN-10: 1493591592
ISBN-13: 9781493591596
Edition: N/A
Authors: Tom Coffman
List price: $19.95
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Description: How Hawaii Changed AmericaThe story begins in Honolulu in late 1939 inside the meetings of a self-styled Council for Interracial Unity. The primary figures are Charles Hemenway, "father" of the University of Hawaii, and his prize adherents from the  More...

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Book details

List price: $19.95
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
Publication date: 5/1/2014
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 324
Size: 5.50" wide x 8.50" long x 0.79" tall
Weight: 1.078
Language: English

How Hawaii Changed AmericaThe story begins in Honolulu in late 1939 inside the meetings of a self-styled Council for Interracial Unity. The primary figures are Charles Hemenway, "father" of the University of Hawaii, and his prize adherents from the interwar period, YMCA youth worker Hung Wai Ching and a brilliant young teacher, Shigeo Yoshida. Together they are the heart of a group who believe that war will come soon, and that people in Hawaii can organize to guide the community through it. Their goals are to prevent a mass incarceration of the Japanese community and, in its stead, mobilize participation in the American war effort. Their work unfolds in a labyrinth of relationships that stretch through the public school system, the university, the YMCA and the U.S. Army. They reach urgently across ethnic lines to form relationships that will be tested to the limit in war. As the story develops, the conflict with Washington D.C.-including President Roosevelt-over issues of race and national origin become a chasm. From this Yoshida derives the group's prophetic mantra, "How we get along during the war will determine how we get along when the war is over."How Hawaii contrasts to the West Coast's forced evacuation and incarceration of 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry, most of them American citizens, is at the heart of "How Hawaii Changed America."

About the AuthorTom Coffman's work in book and documentary film is about the social and political development of Hawaii in context of the Pacific Rim. He was chief political reporter of the Honolulu Star Bulletin (1968-73) and thereafter an independent writer and producer. His "Catch a Wave," a study of contemporary Hawaii politics, sold out five thousand copies in a week and went through five printings. He received the Hawaii Publishers' annual award for Best Nonfiction for his other three books: "Nation Within, The History of America's Occupation of Hawaii"; "The Island Edge of America"; and "I Respectfully Dissent; A Biography of Edward H. Nakamura."He has produced and directed numerous documentaries, including "O Hawaii, From First Settlement to Kingdom" (aired by PBS); "Nation Within" (PBS); "Arirang, The Korean American Journey" (PBS), and "Ninoy Aquino and the Rise of People Power" (PBS). His widely aired "First Battle: The Battle for Equality in Wartime Hawaii" broached the subjects that are explored in depth in "How Hawaii Changed America."

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