x

Our Privacy Policy has changed. By using this site, you agree to the Privacy Policy.

How to Write for Television

ISBN-10: 1416570454
ISBN-13: 9781416570455
Edition: 2008 (Revised)
List price: $20.99 Buy it from $3.00
30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee

If an item you ordered from TextbookRush does not meet your expectations due to an error on our part, simply fill out a return request and then return it by mail within 30 days of ordering it for a full refund of item cost.

Learn more about our returns policy

Description: TV Writing the Right Way!In this guide for every student of the small screen and every scriptwriter dreaming of breaking into the business, writer-producer Madeline DiMaggio hands you the tools of the trade. With dozens of examples from today's hit  More...

Used Starting from $12.20
New Starting from $18.65
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
coins
coins
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Study Briefs

Limited time offer: Get the first one free! (?)

All the information you need in one place! Each Study Brief is a summary of one specific subject; facts, figures, and explanations to help you learn faster.

Add to cart
Study Briefs
Periodic Table Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
Robert's Rules of Order Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
Aromatherapy Basics Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
Study Tactics Online content $4.95 $1.99

Customers also bought

Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading

Book details

List price: $20.99
Copyright year: 2008
Publisher: Touchstone
Publication date: 12/16/2008
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 336
Size: 5.50" wide x 8.50" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.660
Language: English

TV Writing the Right Way!In this guide for every student of the small screen and every scriptwriter dreaming of breaking into the business, writer-producer Madeline DiMaggio hands you the tools of the trade. With dozens of examples from today's hit shows, as well as perennial classics, DiMaggio walks readers through the scriptwriting process, from learning how to watch TV like a writer to developing your script, pitching it, and eventually sealing the deal. DiMaggio answers the questions on every aspiring television writer's mind, with chapters on: The tools of scriptwriting Hooks that sell Creating the pilot Developing the episode, step by step How to create riveting characters Writing long form and cable movies Adaptations and collaborations Marketing your scriptDiMaggio combines her own experience with advice to writers from others in the trade, including agents, producers, animators, and more. This readable, reliable book has been a trusted reference for nearly two decades and is now revised to include the most up-to-date information from today's television climate, from writing for cable, reality, and TV-movie formats to the ever-evolving face of the sitcom. A must-read for anyone aiming to write for TV,How to Write for Televisionwill continue to help budding writers reach their small-screen goals and will prepare them for working in the rapidly changing world of TV.

Madeline DiMaggio has written for TV under contract to Paramount Studios and as a TV freelancer. Her work includes over forty hours of produced scripts for successful sitcoms, one-hour dramas, TV pilots (both half hour and one hour), soaps, animation, documentaries, Movies of the Week, cable movies, and films.

Introduction
The Story of Kevin Falls
The Tools of Scriptwriting
Locales
Narrative/Action
Dialogue
The Scene
Restrictions of the Medium and How You Can Make Them Work for You
Time Limitations
Characters Are Set
Locales Are Set
Budget Limitations
The Hooks That Sell
Hook 'em Fast
The Quick Setup
The Star Is Pivotal
Personal Involvement for the Star
Twists and Turns in the Plot
Powerful Act Ends
A Good Runner
The Button
The Teaser and the Tag
Thoughts to Consider Before Writing Your Spec
Writing the Half-Hour Sitcom
Comedy and Collaboration
Writing Funny: Can It Be Taught?
Structure: The Most Essential Element
Writing the Hour Episode
The One-Hour Structure
Creating Suspense
The Hour Setup
Build to the Act Ends
Developing an Episode Step by Step
Serials and Parallel Storylines
How to Create Riveting Characters
A Character's Back Life/Present Life
Professional Life
Personal Life
Private Life
The Compelling Characteristic
The Television Pilot
The Pilot Concept
Filling in the Concept
Treatments
Movies for Television and Cable
The Two-Hour Movie: The Basic Three-Act Structure
The Movie of the Week: The Seven-Act Structure
What Is Meant by High Concept?
Developing the Two-Hour Movie
Defining the Spine
Establishing the Time Frame
Breaking Down the Turning Points
Broadstroking the Beats
Developing Character
Scenes/Sequences
Interior Voice
First Draft
Rewrites
Polish
Adaptations, Collaborations, and My Biggest Mistakes
Adaptations
Collaborations
My Biggest Mistakes
A Word from Animation Writer Stan Berkowitz
A Word from Reality Writer Gardner Linn
So It's Written. What do I do Now?
A Word from Agent Mitchel Stein
The Most Frequently Asked Questions About Marketing
A Final Note from the Author
Glossary
Resources
To Find Scripts
To Buy Scripts
For Networking
For Links and Information
Screenwriting Software
Fellowships and Writing Competitions
Acknowledgments
Index

×
Free shipping on orders over $35*

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

Learn more about the TextbookRush Marketplace.

×