Key Ideas in Criminology and Criminal Justice

ISBN-10: 1412970148
ISBN-13: 9781412970143
Edition: 2011
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Book details

List price: $48.00
Copyright year: 2011
Publisher: SAGE Publications, Incorporated
Publication date: 10/20/2010
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 208
Size: 5.75" wide x 8.75" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.836

Travis W. Franklin earned his Ph.D. in criminal justice from Washington State University in 2008 and is currently an assistant professor in the College of Criminal Justice at Sam Houston State University. His research interests focus on the effects of race and ethnicity on the processing of offenders through criminal courts, violence in correctional institutions, the causes and correlates of fear of crime, and biological predictors of crime and delinquency. His recent work has appeared in Criminal Justice and Behavior, Journal of Criminal Justice, Feminist Criminology, and Social Justice Research.

Jacinta M. Gau has a Ph.D. in criminal justice and is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at California State University, San Bernardino. Her research focuses on policing, including procedural justice, order maintenance and broken windows, and issues concerning race and policing. Her work has appeared in journals such as Justice Quarterly, Criminology & Public Policy, Police Quarterly, and Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies and Management.

Travis C. Pratt, received his Ph.D. in Criminal Justice from the University of Cincinnati. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science/Criminal Justice at Washington State University (his previous appointment was as an Assistant Professor in the School of Criminal Justice at Rutgers University- Newark from 2000-2002). Pratt's research focuses on structural theories of crime/delinquency and correctional policy. His recent work on correctional policy in particular has appeared in the Corrections Management Quarterly, Crime and Delinquency, Criminal Justice Policy Review, Journal of Criminal Justice, the Journal of Offender Rehabilitation, the Prison Journal, and Justice Quarterly.

Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Key Idea: Rational Offending and Rational Punishment
The Social Context of Criminal Punishment
Beccaria's Proposal
Why It Caught On
Influence: The Rise of the Classical School of Criminology
Empirical Analyses and Critiques of Free Will, Rationality, and Deterrence
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
References
Key Idea: The Science of Criminal Behavior
The Social Context: A Time Without Criminology
The Road to Lombroso
Lombroso and the Body of the Criminal
The Dissemination of Lombroso's Theories
Criticisms of Lombroso's Theories
Lombroso's Influence
Europe
The United States
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
References
Key Idea: Understanding Crime and Society
The Social Context of the Early Twentieth Century
Social Disorganization and Anomie/Strain Theories
Social Disorganization Theory
Merton's Anomie/Strain Theory
Rejecting Individualism
The Legacy of Anomie/Strain and Social Disorganization Theories
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
References
Key Idea: Hirschi's Social Bond/Social Control Theory
The Social Context of the 1960s
Social Bond/Social Control Theory
The Marketing of Social Bond/Social Control Theory
A New Approach to Theory Construction
Operationalizing Theories
Theoretical �Fight Club�
The Legacy of Social Bond/Social Control Theory
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
References
Key Idea: Rehabilitation Is Dead
The Martinson Report
Social Context
Getting the Word Out
The Influence of the Martinson Report
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
References
Key Idea: Crime Control Through Selective Incapacitation
The Context: Criminology, Criminal Justice Policy, and Society in the 1970s
Thinking About Crime
Why It Caught On
Selective Incapacitation's Effect on Criminal Justice and Criminology: Empirical Tests, Empirical Critiques, and Ethical Dilemmas
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
References
Key Idea: The Police Can Control Crime
The Context of Criminology and Policing
Broken Windows Theory: Revamping the Police Role
How Broken Windows Theory Reached Its Audience
The Influence of Broken Windows Theory
Policing, Broken Windows Style
The Economics of Order Maintenance: The Rise of the Business Improvement District
Empirical Tests and Critiques of Broken Windows Theory and Policing
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
References
Key Idea: The War on Drugs
Winning the War is Easy-Just Say No!
The 1980s in Context
The Magic in �Just Say No�
The Impact of �Just Say No�
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
References
Key Idea: Rehabilitation-Not Dead Yet
The Principles of Risk, Need, and Responsivity
Risk
Need
Responsivity
Putting the Principles to the Test
Social Context
Disseminating the Principles of Effective Rehabilitation
The Impact of Meta-Analysis and the Principles of Effective Rehabilitation
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
References
Key Idea: Crime and the Life Course
The Criminological Context of the Early 1990s
Life Course Theories in Criminology
Stability or Change: Moffitt's Dual Taxonomy
Stability and Change: Sampson and Laub's Theory of Age-Graded Informal Social Control
Constructing Testable Theories
Life Course Theory Catches On
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
References
Looking Back, Looking Forward: Conclusions
Looking Back: The Glaring Omissions?
Social Learning Theory
Routine Activity Theory
The Legitimate Contenders
Labeling Theory
Discipline and Punish
Looking Forward: The Future of Criminology and Criminal Justice
Reintegrate Shaming
Biology Redux
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
References
Name Index
Subject Index
About the Authors

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