Using the Workshop Approach in the High School English Classroom Modeling Effective Writing, Reading, and Thinking Strategies for Student Success

ISBN-10: 1412925495
ISBN-13: 9781412925495
Edition: 2006
List price: $31.95 Buy it from $22.37
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Description: Everybody wins when you practice the workshop approach in high school English! Do you find that preparing for standardized tests interferes with teaching advanced thinking, reading, and writing skills in a meaningful way? Do you want to balance  More...

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Book details

List price: $31.95
Copyright year: 2006
Publisher: Corwin Press
Publication date: 10/7/2005
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 192
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.00" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.682
Language: English

Everybody wins when you practice the workshop approach in high school English! Do you find that preparing for standardized tests interferes with teaching advanced thinking, reading, and writing skills in a meaningful way? Do you want to balance test preparation with more creative activities? Success in school and beyond depends on one's ability to read fluently, write coherently, and think critically. This handbook uses the workshop model for exponentially increasing adolescents' abilities in these three key areas. This practical guide addresses the daily running and practice of a workshop-based classroom, using research and the author's own experiences to illustrate how to establish a workshop that: Fosters lasting learning while reinforcing the skills needed for standardized tests Teaches audience and purpose as a vehicle to style and structure Provides a supportive and lively environment in which students are comfortable enough to take risks and share original ideas Try Urbanski's approach to teaching literacy analysis and mentoring student writers, and discover just how rewarding the workshop experience can be!nbsp;

Cynthia D. Urbanski is a Co-Leader of the University of North Carolina-Charlotte Writing Project, where her focus is teacher research, summer institutes, and structuring professional development for surrounding areas. Since graduating from the North Carolina Teaching Fellows Program at UNC-Chapel Hill in 1995 and while completing a master's of English education at UNC-Charlotte in 2000, she has worked with writers from middle grades through the undergraduate level. As an instructor at North Mecklenburg High School since 2000, she has worked with student writers in the International Baccalaureate Program as well as standard-level English courses. Her mission has been to help all students improve their literacy skills by making their writing, reading, and thinking meaningful to them. She continues to run regularly and considers it an integral part of her writing process and her life. Currently she is working to develop the concept of her second book project and spending time with her family in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Foreword
Acknowledgments
About the Author
Running and Writing
The Workshop Culture - A Study of Coaching
Conclusions and The Mission
Who Writes the Rule Book Anyway? Accountability, Tests, and the History of Rhetoric
A Bit of History
And What About the Other Parts of My Curriculum?
Testing and Accountability
Conclusions
Suggested Reading
Coaching and Teaching By Doing; Modeling Thinking, Writing, and Reading
A Horror Story in Two Scenes
Sunday Night Back in the Dark Ages
Sunday Night One Week Later
Modeling; A Simple Concept With Huge Benefits
Modeling Gives Us Fresh Experiences to Draw From
Modeling Can Transform Our Classrooms
Modeling Fosters Authentic Learning
Modeling Will Supercharge Our Planning Time
Modeling In Our Classrooms: What Do We Do?
Modeling Concepts for Writing
A Lesson in Modeling Writing
Modeling Concepts for Reading
A Lesson in Modeling Close Reading and Analysis
Conclusions: Pulling It All Together and Coming Full Circle
Warming Up the Writing Muscles; Two Tools for Invention
Free Writing
What Is Free Writing . . . Really?
Why Does Free Writing Work?
Application: Helping Our Students Discover the Magic
A Lesson in Free Writing
The Last Word on Free Writing
Daybooks. A Place to Store Free Writing and Thinking
Conclusions
The Practice Field; Building Strength and Confidence in Writing and Literary Analysis
Types of Practice
Reader Response and Invention
In-Class Revision and Drafting
Types and Progression of Assignments as Practice
Conclusions
Race Day: Evaluation and the Idea of Grammar
Grammar in Context
The Bottom Line On Grammar
A Grammar Lesson
A Word of Caution
For Further Ideas
A Word About Standards
Watching the Race: Evaluating Student Writing
Grading Practice Writing Without Eradicating Its Purpose
Grading Response Journals or Daybooks
Grading Published Pieces
Portfolios: Looking at the Whole Season and Student Growth Over Time
Conclusions
Suggested Reading
Responding as a Spectator: The Writing Conference
Why Conference Anyway?
A Trek Through a Conference Log
Writing Conventions/Skills in Context
A Fifty-Minute Tutoring Session Translated Into a Ninety-Minute Class
Basic Behavior in a Writing Conference
A Close-up Look at a Conference
Conclusions
Becoming Independent; Writing and Literature Groups
A Scenario: Student Writing as Class Literature
Student Response to Groups
How to Make Groups Work
Model Functional Groups
Provide Structure and Incentive
Help Students Find Their Own Structure
What About the Kid Who Doesn't Buy Into Group Work?
Timing
Writing Groups
Literature Groups
Conclusions
Suggested Reading
Epilogue - Why Teachers Coach
References
Index

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