Invisible Men

ISBN-10: 0871546671
ISBN-13: 9780871546678
Edition: 2012
Authors: Pettit
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Description: For African American men without a high school diploma, being in prison or jail is more common than being employed a sobering reality that calls into question post Civil Rights era social gains. Nearly 70 percent of young black men will be  More...

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Book details

List price: $29.95
Copyright year: 2012
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
Publication date: 6/1/2012
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 156
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.00" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.770
Language: English

For African American men without a high school diploma, being in prison or jail is more common than being employed a sobering reality that calls into question post Civil Rights era social gains. Nearly 70 percent of young black men will be imprisoned at some point in their lives, and poor black men with low levels of education make up a disproportionate share of incarcerated Americans. In Invisible Men, sociologist Becky Pettit demonstrates another vexing fact of mass incarceration: most national surveys do not account for prison inmates, a fact that results in a misrepresentation of U.S. political, economic, and social conditions in general and black progress in particular. Invisible Men provides an eye-opening examination of how mass incarceration has concealed decades of racial inequality. Pettit marshals a wealth of evidence correlating the explosion in prison growth with the disappearance of millions of black men into the American penal system. She shows that, because prison inmates are not included in most survey data, statistics that seemed to indicate a narrowing black-white racial gap on educational attainment, work force participation, and earnings instead fail to capture persistent racial, economic, and social disadvantage among African Americans. Federal statistical agencies, including the U.S. Census Bureau, collect surprisingly little information about the incarcerated, and inmates are not included in household samples in national surveys. As a result, these men are invisible to most mainstream social institutions, lawmakers, and nearly all social science research that isn t directly related to crime or criminal justice. Since merely being counted poses such a challenge, inmates lives including their family background, the communities they come from, or what happens to them after incarceration are even more rarely examined. And since correctional budgets provide primarily for housing and monitoring inmates, with little left over for job training or rehabilitation, a large population of young men are not only invisible to society while in prison but also ill-equipped to participate upon release. Invisible Men provides a vital reality check for social researchers, lawmakers, and anyone who cares about racial equality. The book shows that more than a half century after the first civil rights legislation, the dismal fact of mass incarceration inflicts widespread and enduring damage by undermining the fair allocation of public resources and political representation, by depriving the children of inmates of their parents economic and emotional participation, and, ultimately, by concealing African American disadvantage from public view."

About the Author
Foreword
Invisible Men
Enumerating Inequality
Under Surveillance
Illusions of Progress
Democracy in the Age of Mass Incarceration
Other Casualties of Mass Incarceration
Establishing Justice
Methodological Appendix
References
Index

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