Facing Social Class How Societal Rank Influences Interaction

ISBN-10: 0871544792
ISBN-13: 9780871544797
Edition: 2012
List price: $37.50 Buy it from $30.99
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Description: Many Americans, holding fast to the American Dream and the promise of equal opportunity, claim that social class doesn t matter. Yet the ways we talk and dress, our interactions with authority figures, the degree of trust we place in strangers, our  More...

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Book details

List price: $37.50
Copyright year: 2012
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
Publication date: 3/5/2012
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 272
Size: 6.50" wide x 9.00" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 1.034
Language: English

Many Americans, holding fast to the American Dream and the promise of equal opportunity, claim that social class doesn t matter. Yet the ways we talk and dress, our interactions with authority figures, the degree of trust we place in strangers, our religious beliefs, our achievements, our senses of morality and of ourselves all are marked by social class, a powerful factor affecting every domain of life. In Facing Social Class, social psychologists Susan Fiske and Hazel Rose Markus, and a team of sociologists, anthropologists, linguists, and legal scholars, examine the many ways we communicate our class position to others and how social class shapes our daily, face-to-face interactions from casual exchanges to interactions at school, work, and home. Facing Social Class exposes the contradiction between the American ideal of equal opportunity and the harsh reality of growing inequality, and it shows how this tension is reflected in cultural ideas and values, institutional practices, everyday social interactions, and psychological tendencies. Contributor Joan Williams examines cultural differences between middle- and working-class people and shows how the cultural gap between social class groups can influence everything from voting practices and political beliefs to work habits, home life, and social behaviors. In a similar vein, Annette Lareau and Jessica McCrory Calarco analyze the cultural advantages or disadvantages exhibited by different classes in institutional settings, such as those between parents and teachers. They find that middle-class parents are better able to advocate effectively for their children in school than are working-class parents, who are less likely to challenge a teacher s authority. Michael Kraus, Michelle Rheinschmidt, and Paul Piff explore the subtle ways we signal class status in social situations. Conversational style and how close one person stands to another, for example, can influence the balance of power in a business interaction. Diana Sanchez and Julie Garcia even demonstrate that markers of low socioeconomic status such as incarceration or unemployment can influence whether individuals are categorized as white or black a finding that underscores how race and class may work in tandem to shape advantage or disadvantage in social interactions. The United States has one of the highest levels of income inequality and one of the lowest levels of social mobility among industrialized nations, yet many Americans continue to buy into the myth that theirs is a classless society. Facing Social Class faces the reality of how social class operates in our daily lives, why it is so pervasive, and what can be done to alleviate its effects."

Susan T. Fiske is Eugene Higgins Professor, Psychology and Public Affairs, Princeton University (Ph.D., Harvard University; honorary doctorates, Universit� Catholique de Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium; Universiteit Leiden, Netherlands). She investigates social cognition, especially cognitive stereotypes and emotional prejudices, at cultural, interpersonal, and neuroscientific levels. Author of over 300 publications and winner of numerous scientific awards, she has edited most recently, Beyond Common Sense: Psychological Science in the Courtroom (2008), the Handbook of Social Psychology (2010, 5/e), the Sage Handbook of Social Cognition (2012), and Facing Social Class: How Societal Rank Influences Interaction (2012). Currently an editor of Annual Review of Psychology, Science, and Psychological Review, she wrote two texts: Social Cognition (2013, 4/e) and Social Beings: Core Motives in Social Psychology (in press, 3/e). Sponsored by a Guggenheim, her 2011 Russell-Sage-Foundation book is Envy Up, �Scorn Down: How Status Divides Us. Her graduate students arranged for her winning the Universityrsquo;s Mentoring Award.

Hazel Rose Markus is the Davis-Brack Professor in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. She also co-directs the Stanford Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. Before moving to Stanford in 1994, she was a professor at the University of Michigan, where she received her Ph.D. The focus of her work is the sociological shaping of mind and self. Born in England of English parents and raised in San Diego, California, she has been persistently fascinated by how nation of origin, region of the country, gender, ethnicity, race, religion, and social class shape self and identity. With her colleague Shinobu Kitayama at the University of Michigan, she has pioneered the experimental study of how culture and self influence one another. Markus was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1994 and is a Fellow of APS, APA, and Division 8. Some of her recent co-edited books include CULTURE AND EMOTION: EMPIRICAL STUDIES OF MUTUAL INFLUENCE, ENGAGING CULTURAL DIFFERENCES: THE MULTICULTURAL CHALLENGE IN LIBERAL DEMOCRACIES, and JUST SCHOOLS: PURSUING EQUAL EDUCATION IN SOCIETIES OF DIFFERENCE.

Contributors
Introduction: A Wide-Angle Lens on the Psychology of Social Class
Pervasive Ideas and Social Class
Sociological Perspectives on the Face-to-Face Enactment of Class Distinction
The Class Culture Gap
Institutions and Social Class
Class, Cultural Capital, and Institutions: The Case of Families and Schools
It's Your Choice: How the Middle-Class Model of Independence Disadvantages Working-Class Americans
Interactions and Social Class
D�j� Vu: The Continuing Misrecognition of Low-Income Children's Verbal Abilities
Class Rules, Status Dynamics, and "Gateway" Interactions
The Intersection of Resources and Rank: Signaling Social Class in Face-to-Face Encounters
Individuals and Social Class
Behavioral Decision Research, Social Class, and Implications for Public Policy
When Hard and Soft Class: Class-Based Individualisms in Manhattan and Queens
Putting Race in Context: Socioeconomic Status Predicts Racial Fluidity
The Secret Handshake: Trust in Cross-Class Encounters
Index

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