Enemyship Democracy and Counter-Revolution in the Early Republic

ISBN-10: 0870139800
ISBN-13: 9780870139802
Edition: 2010
Authors: Jeremy Engels
List price: $59.95
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Description: The Declaration of Independence is usually celebrated as a radical document that inspired revolution in the English colonies, in France, and elsewhere. In Enemyship, however, Jeremy Engels views the Declaration as a rhetorical strategy that outlined  More...

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Book details

List price: $59.95
Copyright year: 2010
Publisher: Michigan State University Press
Publication date: 11/1/2010
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 316
Size: 6.50" wide x 9.50" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.342
Language: English

The Declaration of Independence is usually celebrated as a radical document that inspired revolution in the English colonies, in France, and elsewhere. In Enemyship, however, Jeremy Engels views the Declaration as a rhetorical strategy that outlined wildly eff ective arguments justifying revolution against a colonial authority - and then threatened political stability once independence was finally achieved. Enemyship examines what happened during the latter years of the Revolutionary War and in the immediate post-Revolutionary period, when the rhetorics and energies of revolution began to seem problematic to many wealthy and powerful Americans. To mitigate this threat, says Engels, the founders of the United States deployed the rhetorics of what he calls "enemyship," calling upon Americans to unite in opposition to their shared national enemies. notes, bibliography, index.

Jeremy Engels is an Associate Professor of Rhetoric in the Department of Communication Arts & Sciences at Penn State University. His work investigates the rhetorical foundations of democratic politics in the US, specifically by mapping the myriad ways that rhetoric has been transformed into a tool for taming the aspirations, and managing the power, of the public. He is the recipient of the National Communication Association's Karl R. Wallace Memorial Award, given to recognize early career achievement, and also the New Investigator Award. He lives in State College, PA, where he also teaches yoga.

Acknowledgments
Introduction: The Second American Revolution
How Enemyship Became Common Sense
The Dilemmas of American Nationalism
The Army of the Constitution
The Contract of Blood
Conclusion: Hobbes's Gamble and Franklin's Warning
Notes
Selected Bibliography
Index

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