Making Peace with the Land God's Call to Reconcile with Creation

ISBN-10: 0830834575
ISBN-13: 9780830834570
Edition: 2012
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Description: God is reconciling all things in heaven and on earth.We are alienated not only from one another, but also from the land that sustains us. Our ecosystems are increasingly damaged, and human bodies are likewise degraded. Most of us have little  More...

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Book details

List price: $17.00
Copyright year: 2012
Publisher: InterVarsity Press
Publication date: 4/22/2012
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 182
Size: 5.50" wide x 8.25" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.528
Language: English

God is reconciling all things in heaven and on earth.We are alienated not only from one another, but also from the land that sustains us. Our ecosystems are increasingly damaged, and human bodies are likewise degraded. Most of us have little understanding of how our energy is derived or our food is produced, and many of our current industrialized practices are both unhealthy for our bodies and unsustainable for the planet.Agriculturalist Fred Bahnson and theologian Norman Wirzba declare that in Christ, God reconciles all bodies into a peaceful, life-promoting relationship with one another. Because human beings are incarnated in material, bodily existence, we are necessarily interdependent with plants and animals, land and sea, heaven and earth. The good news is that redemption is cosmic, with implications for agriculture and ecology, from farm to dinner table.Bahnson and Wirzba describe communities that model cooperative practices of relational life, with local food production, eucharistic eating and delight in God's provision.Reconciling with the land is a rich framework for a new way of life. Read this book to start down the path to restoring shalom and experiencing Jesus' kingdom of shared abundance, where neighbors are fed and all receive enough.

Fred Bahnson is a permaculture gardener, a pioneer in church-supported agriculture, and an award-winning poet and essayist. Bahnson is the director of the Food and Faith initiative at the Wake Forest University School of Divinity. Formerly, he was a Kellogg Food & Society policy fellow at the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy and the cofounder and former director of Anathoth Community Garden in Cedar Grove, North Carolina. Bahnson is a contributor to the University Press of Kentucky book Wendell Berry and Religion edited by Joel Shuman and the author of the forthcoming Free Press book Soil and Sacrament: Four Seasons Among the Keepers of the Earth. His essay "Climbing the Sphinx" was featured in Best American Spiritual Writing 2007 edited by Philip Zaleski.

Bill McKibben grew up in Lexington, Massachusetts. He was president of the Harvard Crimson newspaper in college. Immediately after college he joined the New Yorker magazine as a staff writer, and wrote much of the "Talk of the Town" column from 1982 to early 1987. After quitting this job, he soon moved to the Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York. His first book, The End of Nature, was published in 1989 by Random House after being serialized in the New Yorker. It is regarded as the first book for a general audience about climate change, and has been printed in more than 20 languages. Several editions have come out in the United States, including an updated version published in 2006. His next book, The Age of Missing Information, was published in 1992. It is an account of an experiment: McKibben collected everything that came across the 100 channels of cable tv on the Fairfax, Virginia system (at the time among the nation's largest) for a single day. He spent a year watching the 2,400 hours of videotape, and then compared it to a day spent on the mountaintop near his home. This book has been widely used in colleges and high schools, and was reissued in 2006. McKibben's latest book is entitled, Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet. Bill currently resides with his wife, writer Sue Halpern, and his daughter, Sophie in Ripton, Vermont. He is a scholar in residence at Middlebury College. 030

Series Preface
Foreword
Prologue: For God So Loved the Soil
Reconciliation with the Land
Learning to See
Reconciliation Through Christ
Field, Table, Communion: The Abundant Kingdom Versus the Abundant Mirage
Reconciliation Through Eating
Bread for the Whole Body of Christ
Epilogue: … So We Can Eat from the Tree of Life
Acknowledgments
Recommendations for Further Reading
Study Guide
Notes
About the Duke Divinity School Center for Reconciliation
About Resources for Reconciliation

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