Writing Theology Well A Rhetoric for Theological and Biblical Writers

ISBN-10: 0826418856
ISBN-13: 9780826418852
Edition: 2006
List price: $34.95
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Book details

List price: $34.95
Copyright year: 2006
Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic
Publication date: 11/24/2006
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 376
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.25" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 1.672
Language: English

Lucretia B. Yaghjian is Director of the The WRITE Program at Episcopal Divinity School and is on Adjunct Faculty of the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry. BA Eng. Lit. Wheaton College (1964); MA Eng. Lit. Columbia Univ. (1967); PhD Eng. Lit. Univ. of Colorado (1976); MDiv WJST (1989).

Acknowledgments
Preface
Writing Theological Rhetorics Well
Writing Theology Well in Its Own Context
Starting Points
The Sociorhetorical Context of Writing Theology
The Sociohistorical Context of Writing Theology
What Is Theology and Why Do Theologians Write It?
Writing Theology as a Rhetorical Art with Augustine of Hippo
Writing Theology as a Scholastic Science with Thomas Aquinas
Writing Theology as a Communal Language with Teresa of Avila
Writing Theology with Gutenberg's Printing Press and the Protestant Reformers
Rewriting Theology as Speech with Friedrich Schleiermacher
Writing Theology as a Theological Author with Albert Schweitzer
Writing Theology as Nonviolent Resistance with Martin Luther King, Jr.
Writing Theology as a Feminist Practice with Rebecca Chopp
Writing Theology in Our Own Context and Its Audiences
What Distinguishes Contemporary Theological Writing from Other Writing?
To Whom and for Whom Is Contemporary Theology Being Written?
Beginning a Theological Writing Assignment: Questions to Ask
Concluding Reflections: Writing Theology Well as an Act of Faith
Writing Theological Reflection Well: Rhetorics of Process, Problem Solving, and Proclamation
Starting Points
What Is Theological Reflection and Why Do Theologians Write It?
A Rhetoric of Process
A Rhetoric of Problem Solving
A Rhetoric of Proclamation
Writing Theological Reflection Papers: Purpose, Style, Voice
Writing the One-Page Theological Reflection Paper in Two Voices
Writing the One-Page Reflection Paper-An Overview
Writing the One-Page Pastoral Reflection Paper: "Why Do You Follow Jesus?"
Pre-writing the Pastoral Reflection Paper: Reading, Reflecting, Preparing
Reading the assignment
Reflecting on the task
Preparing
Freewriting or Outlining Draft # 1: Finding Out What You Want To Say
Freewriting
Outlining
"Writing That and Only That"
"Writing So That Others Will Want To Read It"
Reviewing, Revising, and Refining Papers: A Theological Writers Checklist
Concluding Reflections: Writing Theological Reflection Well
Writing Theological Argument Well: Rhetorics of Inquiry, Reading, Reflection, and Persuasion
Starting Points
What Is the Genre of Argument and Why Do People Write It?
The Deductive Path
The Inductive Path
What Is Theological Argument and Why Do Theologians Write It?
The Rhetorics of Theological Argument: Inquiry, Reading, Reflection, Persuasion
Inquiry
Reading
Reflection
Persuasion
Prerequisites of Writing Theological Argument in an Academic Voice
Taking a Position
Stating Premises and Defining Vocabulary
Mapping the Argument
Entering the Conversation
Writing the One-Page Systematic Reflection Paper: "Was Jesus a Feminist?"
Engaging the Question
Re-engaging the Readings
Developing a Thesis/Claim/"Answer"
Elucidating and/or Qualifying the Claim
Structuring the Argument (Grounds and Warrants)
Concluding the Draft, Counting the Words, Revising to Size
Writing the Theological Essay Examination Well: A "Blueprint"
Preparing for the Examination
Reading the Questions
Rehearsing Your Response
Writing the Examination
Some Final Suggestions
Concluding Reflections: Writing Theological Argument Well
Writing the Theological Essay Well: Rhetorics of Identification, Correlation, Suspicion, and Construction
Starting Points
What Is an Essay and Why Do People Write It?
What Is a Theological Essay and Why Do Theologians Write Them?
What Kinds of Theological Essays Are There and How Shall We Write Them?
What Is a Critical Theological Essay and How Shall We Write It?
What are the rhetorics of the critical theological essay?
Writing the Theological Summary Well: An Outline
Writing the Theological Book Review Well: An Outline
Writing the Theological Critique Well: An Outline
What Is a Constructive Theological Essay and How Shall We Write It?
What is a constructive theological essay?
What is a constructive method?
What Are the Rhetorics of a Constructive Theological Essay and How Do They Inform Its Writing?
The method of correlation
Charting the Rhetorics of the Constructive Theological Essay: Identification, Correlation, Suspicion, Construction
Writing the Constructive Theological Essay Well: A Map of "Correlation"
Writing the Constructive Theological Essay Well: A Structural Map
Writing a Constructive Theological Essay of Your Own: A Progressive Model
Concluding Reflections: Writing the Constructive Theological Essay Well
Writing Theological and Biblical Research Well
Writing Theological Research Well (I): Rhetorics of Research and Investigation
Starting Points
Approaching the Theological Writing and Research Process
Writing Theological Research Well: A Preliminary Map
What Is Research and What Makes People Do It?
What Is Theological Research and Why Do Theologians Do It?
How Does Writing Theological Research Differ from Other Kinds of Theological Writing?
The Form of the Question
A Methodology or Research Perspective
Sources
Conversation with the Present and the Past
Developing the Question into a Theological Research Claim
Narrowing Your Topic
Is Your Research in Place or Must You Create a Research Space?
The Research-in-Place Path
The Create-a-Research-Space Path
How should I begin?
Framing the territory
Reviewing the literature
Curving a research niche, crafting a paper topic
Making a research claim
Pre-viewing the paper
Creating a Research Space for the Historical Jesus with Albert Schweitzer
Framing the historical Jesus research territory
Carving a research niche for the historical Jesus
Reviewing the literature
Making a research claim
Pre-viewing the research plan
From Creating a Theological Research Space to Writing a Research Proposal
Writing Church History Well: A Theological Writer's Outline
Concluding Reflections: Writing Theological Research Well (I): Rhetorics of Research and Investigation
Writing Theological Research Well (II): Rhetorics of Organization and Documentation
Starting Points
What Are the Organizational Dynamics of Writing Theological Research Well?
Building on Your Strengths
Developing Your Strengths with New Strategies
Drafting a Preliminary "Map of Completion"
What Are the Organizational Mechanics of Integrating Reading, Writing, and Research to Write a Theological Research Essay?
Reading, Writing as/and Research: A Methodical Overview
Organizing the reading for theological research
Syntopical Reading Worksheet
From reading researchfully to taking notes in your own way
Mapping a research argument
Integrating Reading, Writing, and Research to Write Theological Research Well
Summarizing your source/author
Questioning your source/author
Talking back to your source/author
Incorporating your source/author
Organizing Research to Write a First Draft
Organizing Research by Outlining
Organizing Research by Drawing a First Draft
Organizing Research by Writing
Writing Theological Research Three Times: A Draft-by-Draft Plan
The research-driven draft
The writer-driven draft
The audience-driven draft
Writing, Revising, and Rewriting "Between the Drafts"
Preparing and Presenting the Audience-Driven Draft
What Are the Requirements for Documenting Sources and Avoiding Plagiarism in a Theological Research Essay?
Plagiarism Preventions and Interventions
Plagiarism, paraphrase, or summary?
A cross-cultural caveat
Preventing plagiarism as a theological task
Plagiarism Prevention and Intervention Checklist
Writing Theological Footnotes Well
From writing to citing footnotes well
Documenting Print Sources in Turabian Style: Overview
Documenting Electronic Sources in Turabian Style: Overview
To footnote or not to footnote?
Keeping footnotes in their place
Some Concluding Guidelines for Writing Theological Footnotes Well
A Checklist for Final Preparation of a Theological Research Paper
Concluding Reflections: Writing Theological Research Well (II)
Writing the Biblical Essay Well (I): Rhetorics of Exegesis and Interpretation
Starting Points
Writing the Biblical Exegesis Well: Preliminary Questions
What Is Biblical Exegesis?
Why Do Biblical Scholars Write Exegesis?
How Does Biblical Exegesis Differ from the Theological Genres That We Have Encountered So Far?
What written biblical exegesis is Not
What written biblical exegesis Is
What Kinds of Papers Are Assigned in Biblical Studies Courses, and How Shall We Write Them?
Writing Biblical Exegesis Well: Preliminary Strategies
Writing the Critical-Historical Exegesis Well in Twelve Exegetical Memos
From Writing Exegetical Memos to Writing the Biblical Exegesis Well
Building a Rhetorical Framework by Beading an Exegetical Necklace
Identifying the thread
Stringing the beads
Beading the necklace: "Text first" or "context first"?
Clasping the necklace
A Biblical Writer's Checklist for an Exegesis Paper
Documenting Sources in SBL Style
Concluding Reflections: Writing the Biblical Exegesis Well
Writing the Biblical Essay Well (II): A Critical-Hermeneutical Rhetoric
Starting Points
A Hermeneutical Preface
Hermeneutics as Reading the Word and Reading the World
From the Critical-Historical Biblical Essay to the Critical-Hermeneutical Biblical Essay: A Hermeneutical Flow Chart
E. D. Hirsch's Author-Centered Hermeneutic
Resources for writing the biblical exegesis/essay well
Hans-Georg Gadamer's Subject-Centered Hermeneutic
Resources for writing the biblical exegesis/essay well
Paul Ricoeur's Reader-Centered Hermeneutic
Resources for writing the biblical exegesis/essay well
The Writer-Centered Hermeneutic
The Critical-Hermeneutical Path for Writing the Biblical Essay Well
Introducing the Biblical Essay: Definitions and Distinguishing Features
What Is a Critical-Hermeneutical Essay and How Shall We Write It?
The Biblical Essay: A Critical-Hermeneutical Map
Literary-Linguistic Locations
Historical Investigations
Theological Formulations
Hermeneutical Destinations
From Critical-Hermeneutical Memos to the Critical-Hermeneutical Essay: Outlining a Critical Framework, Building a Hermeneutical Bridge
Outlining a Critical Framework
Identifying the recurring threads
Choosing the rhetorical string
Stringing the beads
Building Critical-Hermeneutical Bridges by Writing the Biblical Essay Well
Building rhetorical bridges with writing
Building contextual bridges with sociocultural models
Building hermeneutical bridges with cross-disciplinary conversations
Building dialogical bridges through a hermeneutics of diversity
Concluding Reflections: From Building Hermeneutical Bridges to Finding Your Own Words
Toward a Theological Style and Voice of Your Own
Writing with Theological Imagination Well: Rhetorics of Analogy, Metaphor, and Symbol
Starting Points
What Is the Theological Imagination and How Shall We Write with It?
What Are the Rhetorics that Empower the Theological Imagination?
Writing with Analogy Well
Analogy: An Introduction
Analogy: A Preliminary Definition
Analogy: Classical Approaches
Analogy: Contemporary Approaches
Writing with Analogy Well: A Writer-Based Guide
Writing analogy well as analogical method, or rhetoric
Writing analogy well with analogical speech and syntax
Writing with Metaphor Well
Metaphor: An Introduction
Metaphor: The Word-Based Approach
Metaphor: The Sentence-Based Approach
Toward a Writer-Based Approach to Metaphor
Writing with Metaphor Well: A Writer-Based Guide
Building a Bridge from Metaphor to Symbol: An Interlude
Writing with Symbol Well
Symbol: An Introduction
Definitions of Symbol: Four Starting Points
Sign-based definition of symbol
Meaning-based definition of symbol
Mediation-based definition of symbol
Text-based definition of symbol
Writing with Symbol Well: A Writer-Based Guide
Discovering the symbol
Developing the symbol
Dialoguing with the symbol
Deconstructing the symbol
Reconstructing the symbol
Concluding Reflections: Writing with Theological Imagination Well
Rewriting Theology Well (I): Rhetorics of Style and Voice
Starting Points
What Is "Style," and How Do Writers Define It?
Style Is "How You Write"
Style Is "How You Write What You Write"
Style Is "How You Write What You Write When You Write in a Given Genre"
Style Is "How You Write What You Write When You Write from a Stance"
Style Is "How You Write What You Write When You Write for an Audience"
What Is Theological Style, Narrowly Conceived, and How Do Theological Writers Define It?
Saint Augustine
Thomas Aquinas
Julian of Norwich
What Is Theological Style, Broadly Conceived, and How Do Theological Writers Define It?
What is Theological Style, Broadly Conceived, and How Shall We Define it?
What Is Voice and the Relationship between Style and Voice in Theological Writing?
What Is Voice?
What Is the Relationship between Style and Voice in Theological Writing?
Toward a Theological Voice of One's Own
How Does One Identify, Develop, and Refine a Theological Voice of One's Own?
Theological Plain Style: A Profile for Theological Writers
Characteristics of Theological Plain Style for Theological Writers
Inclusive Language Style Sheet for Theological Writers
Concluding Reflections: Rewriting Theology Well: Rhetorics of Style and Voice
Rewriting Theology Well (II): Rhetorics of Words, Sentences, and Paragraphs
Starting Points
What Do Theological Words Do? Finding, Choosing, and Using Words Well to Write Theology Well
The Parts of Speech and Their Place in Theological Prose
Nouns
Verbs
Choosing Theological Words Well-A Selective Sampling
Concrete words
Conceptual words
Critical words
Constructed words
Figurative words
Choosing and Using Words: A Theological Writer's Checklist
What Do Theological Sentences Do? Writing Sentences Well to Write Theological Sentences Well
Do You Like Sentences?
How to Write Sentences Well: A Brief Review
Capitalizing and punctuating sentences correctly
Ordering sentences clearly and coherently
Combining sentence elements skillfully
Correcting sentence errors effectively
Constructing sentences fluently
Writing Theological Sentences Well: A Historical Introduction
What do Theological Sentences Do?
They ask questions
The make assertions
They define terms
They compare and contrast theological subject matter
They summarize and synthesize
Writing Sentences Well: A Theological Writer's Checklist
What Do Theological Paragraphs Do? Writing Paragraphs Well to Write a Theological Paper Well
Unity
Coherence
Emphasis
The Long and the Short of It
Writing Paragraphs with Unity, Coherence, and Emphasis: A Revision Heuristic
Final Considerations
What Do Theological Paragraphs Do? Writing Theological Paragraphs Well with Elsa Tamez and Jon Sobrino
Introductory paragraphs
Expository paragraphs
Evidential paragraphs
Transitional paragraphs
Concluding paragraphs
Writing Paragraphs Well: A Theological Writer's Checklist
Concluding Reflections: Writing Theological Words, Sentences, and Paragraphs Well
Rewriting Theology Well (III): A Rhetoric of Revision
Starting Points
Rewriting, Revision, and Becoming Your Own Best Editor
The Chopping Block
The Writing Patch
Waiting
Watering
Fertilizing
Grafting
Creating the conditions
Back to the Drawing Board
A Theological Style and Voice of Your Own
The Peer Editing Heuristic
Editing for Grammatical Grace
A Revision Heuristic of Your Own
Concluding Reflections: Rewriting Theology Well
Epilogue: Writing Theology Well in Your New Context: From Writing for Professors to Writing with a Professional Voice
Notes
Index

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