Colonialism and the Emergence of Science Fiction

ISBN-10: 0819568740
ISBN-13: 9780819568748
Edition: 2008
Authors: John Rieder
List price: $24.95
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Description: This is the first full-length study of emerging Anglo-American science fiction's relation to the history, discourses, and ideologies of colonialism and imperialism. Nearly all scholars and critics of early science fiction acknowledge that  More...

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Book details

List price: $24.95
Copyright year: 2008
Publisher: Wesleyan University Press
Publication date: 5/30/2008
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 200
Size: 6.00" wide x 8.75" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.682
Language: English

This is the first full-length study of emerging Anglo-American science fiction's relation to the history, discourses, and ideologies of colonialism and imperialism. Nearly all scholars and critics of early science fiction acknowledge that colonialism is an important and relevant part of its historical context, and recent scholarship has emphasized imperialism's impact on late Victorian Gothic and adventure fiction and on Anglo-American popular and literary culture in general. John Rieder argues that colonial history and ideology are crucial components of science fiction's displaced references to history and its engagement in ideological production. He proposes that the profound ambivalence that pervades colonial accounts of the exotic "other" establishes the basic texture of much science fiction, in particular its vacillation between fantasies of discovery and visions of disaster. Combining original scholarship and theoretical sophistication with a clearly written presentation suitable for students as well as professional scholars, this study offers new and innovative readings of both acknowledged classics and rediscovered gems. Includes discussion of works by Edwin A. Abbott, Edward Bellamy, Edgar Rice Burroughs, John W. Campbell, George Tomkyns Chesney, Arthur Conan Doyle, H. Rider Haggard, Edmond Hamilton, W. H. Hudson, Richard Jefferies, Henry Kuttner, Alun Llewellyn, Jack London, A. Merritt, Catherine L. Moore, William Morris, Garrett P. Serviss, Mary Shelley, Olaf Stapledon, and H. G. Wells.

JOHN RIEDER is a professor of English at the University of Hawai'i at M'anoa.

Introduction: The Colonial Gaze and the Frame of Science Fiction
Fantasies of Appropriation: Lost Races and Discovered Wealth
Dramas of Interpretation
Artificial Humans and the Construction of Race
Visions of Catastrophe
Notes
Works Cited

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