Up Is up, but So Is Down New York's Downtown Literary Scene, 1974-1992

ISBN-10: 0814740111

ISBN-13: 9780814740118

Edition: 2006

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Description: View the Table of Contents. Read the Introduction. Among "The Village Voice"s 25 Favorite Books of 2006 Winner of the 2007 AAUP Book, Jacket, and Journal Show in the Trade Illustrated Book Design category. Up Is Up itself has a scrapbook feel. It gathers poems, excerpts and short stories as well as handmade magazine covers, pamphlets and posters that capture the collaborative, on-the-fly spirit of the period. . . . What is most arresting about UP IS UP is not its discovery of any individual genius but its invocation of an electrifying social energy that helped blast out an intellectual space for then-'transgressive' female and gay writers. -- "New York Times Book Review" "Some of us like our angels with dirty faces; witness the lovingly reproduced artifacts of Up Is Up, But So Is Down: New York's Downtown Literary Scene, 1974-1992, a comprehensive compendium of below-14th Street literary productions by everyone from Laurie Anderson to Nick Zedd, focusing on the output of small magazines of the era like Koff, Bomb, and Between C and D...[the] stories meld dry satire with heart-churningly desperate transmissions of damaged humanity." -- "Village Voice" "Exhilarating. . . . Up Is Up reproduces flyers and pages from lit mags to convey downtowns heady DIY ethos. The writing itself displays sensibilities that are at once fiery and cool. Cookie Mueller, Dennis Cooper, Wojnarowicz and many others merge crackling prose and a matter-of-fact tone to burrow into disturbing corners of sexual desire. AIDS takes a serious toll in the 80s, and becomes the haunting focus in amazing selections by novelist Gary Indiana and poet Tim Dlugos. Even as thescene begins to wind down, the book nails the deep thrills of talk and collaboration, especially in novelist Lynne Tillmans complex rendering of two friends bar-set conversation. That gift for gab lives on in the epilogue, a spirited conversation between Eileen Myles and Cooper, who resist mythologizing but invoke the scenes glory nonetheless." -- "Time Out New York" Up Is Up is a remarkable monument to the vibrancy of the Downtown scene. There are moments of romantic myth-making, dysfunctional beauty and hilarious profundity. It documents a now-gone era when lower Manhattan was an affordable oasis for artists, writers and musicians, when poetry and prose rubbed up against punk and visual art before drunkenly stumbling into an endless pansexual orgy. -- "New York Press" Stosuys anthology commemorates the underground writings and visual culture that proliferated below 14th Street after the Beats and the New York School poets and before the ravages of Aids, rising rent and blogs...Such writings rarely appeared above ground. They were disseminated in graffiti, on the body, in homemade zines posted to friends or in Xeroxed chapbooks. -- "London Review of Books" "New York University Press has released the cutting-edge equivalent of a memory book: Up Is Up, But So Is Down: New Yorks Downtown Literary Scene, 1974-1992, Brooklyn writer Brandon Stosuys magisterial anthology-cum-reliquary of downtown writing and literary art. Its oversized, gorgeously decorated and even decorous pages host an impossibly rich variety of prose, poetry and the unidentifiable either/or -- all produced by writers who either lived or worked or once visited or were published on or readin small presses and performance spaces below Manhattans Union Square but north of Mammons Wall Street." -- "Forward" "For the hipster: Up is Up, But So is Down: New York's Downtown Literary Scene, 1974-1992, edited by Brandon Stousy. Long before Starbucks took over Greenwich Village, and one-bedroom rents hit $3,000, downtown Manhattan was scuzzy, vibrant and alive with arts. Collecting the work of rock-star poets and beat-down bohemians, this book attests to the fact that the life portrayed in Mary Gaitskill's edgy work wasn't a dream." -- "Salt Lake City Weekly" "While the major players in New York's

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Book details

List price: $35.00
Copyright year: 2006
Publisher: New York University Press
Publication date: 10/1/2006
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 500
Size: 8.50" wide x 11.00" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 3.542
Language: English

Brandon Stosuy is a staff writer at Pitchfork, contributes to The Believer, Magnet, and the Village Voice, and has written for Bomb, Bookforum, L.A. Weekly, and Slate, among other publications. He lives in Brooklyn, where he is at work on his first novel.

Eileen Myles, named by BUST magazine "the rock star of modern poetry," is the author of more than twenty books of poetry and prose, including Chelsea Girls, Cool for You, Sorry, Tree, and Not Me (Semiotext(e), 1991), and is the coeditor of The New Fuck You (Semiotext(e), 1995). Myles was head of the writing program at University of California, San Diego, from 2002 to 2007, and she has written extensively on art and writing and the cultural scene. Most recently, she received a fellowship from the Andy Warhol/Creative Capital Foundation.

Introduction
The 1970s
Introduction to the 1970s
From "the East Village 1970-71"
From I dreamt I was a nymphomaniac! : imagining
Untitled
3170 Broadway
The age
From Modern love
Piss factory
Blank generation
It's all true
I missed punk
Words in reverse
From Epiphanies
From New York City in 1979
From Bikini girl no. 8
On the loose
The 1980s
Introduction to the 1980s
A Lower East Side poem
Lower East Side mesostics 81-82
From Bagatelles
Newspaper poem
Haiku from Public Illumination Magazine
Zooin' in Alphabet Town
While you were out
AC-DC
Lunch break
Lecture on Third Avenue (after v-effect)
In the dark
This is it?
Cardiac
Practicing without a license
Five stories
3 stories
The St. Mark's baths
TV
Baby birds
From "Idioglossia"
From Swimming to Cambodia
Go-going - New York & New Jersey - 1978-79
Three stories from The traveling woman
Poem with a title at the end
Modern saint #271
Modern romances
From Girls, visions and everything
From "Phil Spector : a performance poem for three groups of voices"
On bohomelessness : a convoluted guide to the other side
From Haunted houses
George : Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
Fear on 11th Street and Avenue A, New York City
The angel
Neighbor
"The red high heels" from Love me tender
"Money" from Kill the poor
Fulcrum of disaster
From Totem of the depraved
More or less urgent
Gathering bruises
Beauties who live only for an afternoon
On the side of the road
Bread and water
From Beer mystic
From Horse crazy
G-9
The 1990s
Introduction to the 1990s
From "North of Abyssinia"
The new school 1990
Folk
From The colorist
Love is a many splendored thing in Brooklyn
Into the sunset
From "Lovers slash friends"
Beautiful youth
In the abbey of arcane synthesis : random thoughts posing as analysis in the global pan-assassination crisis
A visit from Mom
From Two girls, fat and thin
Divine comedy
In Brooklyn
Janine, or how my grandmother died and left me holding the banana
Eighteen to twenty-one
A short history of everyone in the world
The shower
From "Between the hammer and the anvil"
Three poems from I always vote for sparrow for president
A division of water
The weirdness of the text
"Go ahead" and "mistaken identity"
Self-portrait in twenty-three rounds
"War stars," an excerpt from the fictional memoir "giving up the ghost"
Downtown publication roundup : an addendum
Afterword : the scene : a conversation between Dennis Cooper and Eileen Myles
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