Latino/a Condition A Critical Reader

ISBN-10: 0814718957
ISBN-13: 9780814718957
Edition: 1998
List price: $32.00
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Description: View the Table of Contents .nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;Read the Introduction . "The authors of these essays explore the theme of Latino/a identity by presenting popular media images of Latino/as and by examining the issues of representation that these images  More...

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Book details

List price: $32.00
Copyright year: 1998
Publisher: New York University Press
Publication date: 5/1/1998
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 715
Size: 7.25" wide x 10.00" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 2.794
Language: English

View the Table of Contents .nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;Read the Introduction . "The authors of these essays explore the theme of Latino/a identity by presenting popular media images of Latino/as and by examining the issues of representation that these images raise...instructive and useful." Choice "A valuable and highly informative discussion of the theoretical questions that underlie the production of popular culture in the twenty-first century." Latin American Research Review All too often, groups who do not effectively define themselves find that others assume the power to explain them. Until recently, this has certainly been the case with American Latinos/as, as evidenced by demeaning media stereotypes and the groups's near-invisibility in U.S. history texts. Indeed, as the demise of the Soviet empire shifted America's national anxieties to domestic irritants, images of Latinos/as changed for the worse. Immigration reform acts in 1965 and 1986 brought millions of new immigrants from Latin American countries. By the end of the 1980s, their presence had become vexing to many. English-only movements sprang up. Bilingual education came under attack. Movements to close the border gained momentum. Now, Latinos/as are speaking back.The Latino Conditionbrings together some of these new voices, and some of the pioneers, in law, sociology, history, politics, and literature. This pathbreaking volume addresses such questions as: Who exactly is a Latino/a? Who is Hispanic? Who is Chicano/a? How did Spanish-speaking people come to the United States? Should the United States try to control Latino/a immigration and is this even possible? How has "the silent minority" been stereotyped by popular culture? Why don't traditional civil rights remedies work for Latinos/as? Is assimilation possible, or even desirable, for all Latinos/as? What makes for conflict between Latinos/as and other racial groups? Are Latinos/as a race or an ethnicity? Should Latino/a children be taught in Spanish? What can border theory tell us about culture, language, and power?

Jean Stefancic  is Research Professor of Law at Seattle University and is the author of many articles and books on civil rights, law reform, social change, including No Mercy: How Conservative Think Tanks and Foundations Changed America’s Social Agenda .

Acknowledgments
Introduction
The Shape of the Latino Group: Who Are We and What Are We Talking about Anyway?
Hispanics? That's What They Call Us
Welcome to the Old World
Chance, Context, and Choice in the Social Construction of Race
Latino/a Identity and Multi-Identity: Community and Culture
Building Bridges: Latinas and Latinos at the Crossroads
Life in the Hyphen
Masks and Identity
Who Counts? Title VII and the Hispanic Classification
Race, Identity, and "Box Checking": The Hispanic Classification in OMB Directive No. 15
Re-imagining the Latino/a Race
Conquest and Immigration: How We Got (Get) Here
Latinos in the United States: Invitation and Exile
Greasers Go Home: Mexican Immigration, the 1920s
How Much Responsibility Does the U.S. Bear for Undocumented Mexican Migration?
Undocumented Immigrants and the National Imagination
Hispanic Children and Their Families
Immigration Politics, Popular Democracy, and California's Proposition 187
The Racial Politics of Proposition 187
Natives and Newcomers
The Latino Challenge to Civil Rights and Immigration Policy in the 1990s and Beyond
Nativism, Racism, and Our Social Construction as a "Problem" Group: How Once We Were Here, We Were Racialized by the Dominant Culture
Anglo-Saxons and Mexicans
"Occupied" Mexico
Initial Contacts: Niggers, Redskins, and Greasers
The Master Narrative of White Supremacy in California
Occupied America
Mexican Americans and Whiteness
Race and Erasure: The Salience of Race to Latinos/as
"The Mexican Problem"
Citizens as "Foreigners"
Racial Construction and Demonization in Mass Culture: Media Treatment and Stereotypes
Racial Depiction in American Law and Culture
Bordertown: From Assimilation Narrative to Social "Problem"
The Border according to Hollywood: The Three Caballeros, Pancho, and the Latin Senoritas
Born in East L.A.: An Exercise in Cultural Schizophrenia
Lone Star and the Faces of Despair in INS Raids
Big Time Players
Still Looking for America: Beyond the Latino National Political Survey
Counterstories: We Begin to Talk Back and "Name Our Own Reality"
My Grandfather's Stories and Immigration Law
Storytelling for Oppositionists and Others
Lay Lawyering
Masks and Resistance
Mexican Americans as a Legally Cognizable Class
American Apocalypse
Rebellious Lawyering and Resistance Strategies: We Fight Back
The Idea of a Constitution in the Chicano Tradition
Early Chicano Activism: Zoot Suits, Sleepy Lagoon, and the Road to Delano
"Breaking the Law" on Principle
Life in the Trenches
The Work We Know So Little About
Revolutionary Art and Artists
Revisionist Law: Does the Legal System Work for Us?
The Mexican-American Litigation Experience: 1930-1980
The Black/White Binary Paradigm of Race
The Black/White Binary: How Does It Work?
The Intersection of Immigration Status, Ethnicity, Gender, and Class
Bringing International Human Rights Home
Chicano Indianism
Rodrigo's Chronicle
Choosing the Future
The Well-Defended Academic Identity
Assimilationism: Maybe Our Best Strategy Is Just to Duck?
A Scholarship Boy
LULAC and the Assimilationist Perspective
Melting Pot or Ring of Fire?
Out of the Barrio
Masks and Acculturation
Straddling Separate Worlds
Neither Here nor There
Harvard Homeboy
Splits and Tensions within the Civil Rights Community
Origins of Black/Brown Conflict
Beyond Black/White: The Racisms of Our Time
It's Not Just Black and White Anymore
Tensions and Differences within the Latino Community
A Long-Standing Commitment
Sex, Gender, and Class: Sure I'm a Latino, but I'm Still Different from You - How about It?
Mexican Gender Ideology
Domestic Violence against Latinas by Latino Males
Maternal Power and the Deconstruction of Male Supremacy
What's in a Name? Retention and Loss of the Maternal Surname
A Chicana Perspective on Feminism
Three Perspectives on Workplace Harassment of Women of Color
Culture and Economic Violence
Gendered Inequality
Notes on the Conflation of Sex, Gender, and Sexual Orientation: A QueerCrit and LatCrit Perspective
English-Only, Bilingualism, Interpreters: You Mean I Can't Speak Spanish?
Hold Your Tongue
A Bilingual-Education Initiative as a Prop. 187 in Disguise?
American Languages, Cultural Pluralism, and Official English
Law and Language(s)
How the Garcia Cousins Lost Their Accents
Death by English
Lawyers, Linguists, Story-Tellers, and Limited English-Speaking Witnesses
Hernandez: The Wrong Message at the Wrong Time
Attorney as Interpreter
The Politics of Discretion: Federal Intervention in Bilingual Education
The Border as Metaphor: What Border Theory Tells Us about Culture
Borderlands
Surveying Law and Borders
Border Crossings
Sandra Cisneros: The Fading of the Warrior Hero
Voices/Voces in the Borderlands
Street Vendors: The Battle over Cultural Interpretation
Bibliography
Contributors
Index

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