Dance and Music A Guide to Dance Accompaniment for Musicians and Dance Teachers

ISBN-10: 0813018870

ISBN-13: 9780813018874

Edition: 2001

Authors: Harriet Cavalli

List price: $39.95 Buy it from $28.44
This item qualifies for FREE shipping

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee

If an item you ordered from TextbookRush does not meet your expectations due to an error on our part, simply fill out a return request and then return it by mail within 30 days of ordering it for a full refund of item cost.

Learn more about our returns policy

Description:

New Starting from $47.60
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
coins
coins
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!
Customers also bought
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading

Book details

List price: $39.95
Copyright year: 2001
Publisher: University Press of Florida
Publication date: 6/30/2001
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 448
Size: 7.00" wide x 9.75" long x 1.50" tall
Weight: 1.936
Language: English

Foreword
Preface
What Is Dance Accompaniment?
Essential Elements of Music for Dance
Rhythm
Meter/time signature
Melody
Tempo
Harmony
Tonality
Phrasing
Dynamics
Line
Style
Musical Forms for Dance and How to Count Them
2/4 or [characters not reproducible] -Examples 3-12: all are twos
Tango (habanera, beguine, zapote, samba, rumba, etc.)-Examples 3 and 3a
March (to be discussed under 4/4s)
Rag-Example 4
Polka-Example 5
Coda, galop, can-can (sometimes even "circus music")-Examples 6 and 7
Czardas-friszka-Example 8
Miscellaneous-Examples 9-12
3/4-Examples 13-29: sixes and threes
Sarabande-Example 13: six or three
Polonaise/Polacca-Examples 14 and 15: six
Bolero-Example 16: six
Minuet-Example 17: six or three
Landler-Example 18: three (sometimes six)
Mazurka-Examples 19-21: three (occasionally six)
Waltz-Examples 22-28: three
Slow waltz-Example 22
Medium-tempo waltz-Example 23
Spanish waltz-Example 24
Viennese waltz
Fast waltz-Example 25
"Big waltz" or "grand allegro waltz"-Examples 26-28
Miscellaneous-Example 29: six
3/8-Examples 30-33: all are threes
Medium-tempo-Examples 30 and 31
Allegro-Examples 32 and 33
4/4 or C -Examples 34-39; all are twos
Czardas-lassu-Examples 34a and 34b
March-Example 35
Gavotte-Example 36
Stop time-Example 37
Miscellaneous-Examples 38 and 39
6/8-Examples 40-48: all are threes except the 6/8 march (two)
Barcarolle-Example 40: three
March-Example 41: two
"Big waltz" or "grand allegro waltz"-Examples 42 and 43: three
Tarantella-Example 44: three
Miscellaneous-Examples 45-48: all are threes
9/8-Example 49: six
12/8-Example 50: three
The adagio-Examples 51-64
2/4 adagio-Example 51: two
3/4 adagio-Examples 52-55: threes and sixes
3/8 adagio-Example 56: three
4/4 or C adagio-Examples 57-60: twos
6/8 adagio-Example 61: three
9/8 adagio-Example 62: six
12/8 adagio-Examples 63 and 64: two (rarely, three)
For Dance Teachers
Music and you
Music and your students
How a new dance teacher deals with an accompanist
Learning to count correctly
Face to face with your accompanist in the studio
Where to demonstrate
What to say during a demonstration
How to get a combination started
Preparations (introductions, "four-for-nothings," lead-ins, etc.)
How to correct faulty tempos
The second side of barre combinations
How to continue a combination
How to stop a combination
How to finish a combination
How to organize groups of students in the center
How to mark clearly
Dos and don'ts for dance teachers
Dos
Don'ts
Checklist
For Accompanists
Background information for beginning accompanists
Classroom etiquette
The structure of a dance class
The barre (sometimes called side practice)
The center (sometimes called centre practice)
How teachers demonstrate
Qualities of steps and movements
At the barre
Plies
Tendus
The degage family
Ronds de jambe a terre
In two
In three
Fondus
Frappes
Adagios/Developpes
Petits battements serres and battus
Ronds de jambe en l'air
Grands battements and battements en cloche and en balancoire
Grands battements with the leg going up on the count
Grands battements with the leg going up on "and"
Grands battements en cloche and en balancoire
Stretching
The cambre family
Cambres and circular ports de bras within plie combinations
Medium-tempo waltz
Slow waltz, slow 3/4, or 9/8
Cambres and circular ports de bras added onto rond de jambe a terre combinations
Slow waltz
Moderato two or tango
Medium-tempo waltz
Movements of the cambre family included in combinations of a non-legato quality
In the center
The first combinations in the center
Adagios
The turn/pirouette family
The adagio turn or pirouette
"Normal" pirouette combinations
Turns in attitude and arabesque
Turns in succession
Chaines/Deboules
Soutenu turn
Tour en l'air
Balances
Sautes/jumps
Changements
Petit allegro
Medium allegro
Grand allegro
Turns in succession
Reverence/port de bras
The tools of an accompanist's trade
Repertoire
How to develop it
Improvisation
When you must improvise
Using written music
Syllabus music
Collections of music
Czerny etudes
Operas and operettas
Salon music
The traditional ballet repertoire
Show tunes
Where to find it
How to organize it
In binders
By step
By complete class
By form
By composer
In your head
Adaptation of music
Mechanical phrasing
Kinesthetic phrasing and accents
Important musical additions
Starts (preparations, introductions, "four-for-nothings," "four ins," lead-ins, vamps, and who knows what else)
Two-bar or six-count preparations
Four-count preparations
Two chords
Without preparation
Transitions (also known as bridges)
Balances
Finishes
Arpeggiation
Pianistic approaches to producing an orchestral sound
Pianistic methods
Posture and stamina
Octaves
The elusive arm muscle
The use of the fourth finger on black keys
Fingering
Pedaling
Reverse pedaling
The sostenuto (middle) pedal
The soft (damper) pedal
How sensitive pedaling can help dancers breathe correctly
Tone quality
Memorization
Sightreading
Pianos you may meet
Miscellaneous
An overview of various dance classes
Pre-ballet and children's classes
Adult beginner class
Intermediate, advanced, and professional classes
Point class
Men's class
Variations and repertoire classes
Classes for pas de deux, adagio, partnering, double work, and so on
Theory class
Character class
Tap class
Workshops, lecture-demonstrations, visitors' day, and so on
Auditions
The first class for a new teacher
Potential areas of misunderstanding
Tempo
Ritard
Rubato
Fermatas and accelerandos
Setting and changing tempos
Marking
Adagios
"Ands"
"That's too heavy"
Miscellaneous
In the rehearsal room
Company class and pre-performance warm-up
Playing for rehearsal
The choreographer
The conductor
The photographer
Cathwords
Tempo
Ritards, accelerandos, and fermatas
Problems
Marking scores
The grand pas de deux
Rehearsal with tape/CD
The music librarian
Calling cues
The gray areas
Checklist
Afterword
Musical Examples
Glossary
Notes
References
Recommended Reading
Index
About the Author
×
Free shipping on orders over $35*

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

Learn more about the TextbookRush Marketplace.

×