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Real Ebonics Debate : Power, Language and the Education of African-American Children

ISBN-10: 0807031453
ISBN-13: 9780807031452
Edition: 1998
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Description: When the Oakland school board issued a resolution calling for schools to acknowledge the reality of black English in the classroom, a huge national outcry and media frenzy arose. The debate about "Ebonics" made national headlines, quickly became  More...

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Book details

Copyright year: 1998
Publisher: Beacon Press
Publication date: 6/17/1998
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 248
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.25" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.990
Language: English

When the Oakland school board issued a resolution calling for schools to acknowledge the reality of black English in the classroom, a huge national outcry and media frenzy arose. The debate about "Ebonics" made national headlines, quickly became politicized and divisive, opened wounds about ra ce, then faded from public consciousness. But in the classrooms of America, the question of how to engage the distinctive language of many African-American children remains urgent. In The Real Ebonics Debate, some of our most important progressive educators, linguists, and writers, as well as teachers and students reporting from the field, examine the lessons of the Ebonics controversy and unravel the complexities of the issue, covering realities never acknowledged by the media. They discuss the meaning of th e political debate; they think through the detailed dynamics of teacher-student interaction; and they give wonderfully precise linguistic insight into the structure and uses of African-American English-from colloquial speech to the literary voice of Toni Morrison. The Real Ebonics Debate cuts to the heart of how America educates African-American children. It will have immediate and enduring value for anyone thinking about race and schools.

Lisa Delpit is an African American and a lifelong teacher who promotes the idea of having "visions of success for poor children and children of color." Her 1995 book, Other People's Children: Cultural Conflict in the Classroom, discusses how to better train teachers by using nine specific factors, among them understanding the brilliance of the children, recognizing and building on the children's strengths, using familiar metaphors and experiences from the children's world, and nurturing a sense of connection to a greater community, of which they are a part. Delpit's father owned a restaurant and her mother taught high school. Her parents set an example by providing free meals for local elementary school children who could not afford to buy lunch. This fostered in Delpit a commitment to helping others. Delpit was one of the first African Americans to attend desegregated Catholic schools in Louisiana. She also attended Antioch College in Ohio and Harvard University. She has worked at the University of Alaska, Morgan State University's Urban Institute for Urban Research, and Georgia State University, holding the Benjamin E. Mays Chair of Urban Educational Leadership. Delpit received a MacArthur Award for Outstanding Contribution to Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 1993.

Preface
Foreword
Introductions
'On Know Why They Be Trippin': Reflections on the Ebonics Debate
What Should Teachers Do? Ebonics and Culturally Responsive Instruction
What is Ebonics?
Black English/Ebonics: What It Be Like?
If Ebonics Isn't a Language, Then Tell Me, What Is? (pace James Baldwin, 1979)
What is Black English? What is Ebonics?
Holding on to a Language of Our Own an Interview with Linguist John Rickford
If Black English Isn't a Language, Then Tell Me, What Is?
Ebonics: Myths and Realities
Classroom Implications
Embracing Ebonics and Teaching Standard English an Interview with Oakland Teacher Carrie Secret
An Ante-Bellum Sermon
The Seedling
Kitchen Poets and Classroom Books: Literature from Children's Roots
Listen to Your Students: an Interview with Oakland High School English Teacher Hafeezah Adamadavia Dalji
Teaching Teachers About Black Communications
Ebonics Speakers and Cultural, Linguistic, and Political Test Bias
Removing the Mask Roots of Oppression Through Omission
The Oakland Resolution
The Oakland Ebonics Resolution
Ebonics Resolution Revisions
Recommendations of the Task Force on Educating African-American Students
What is the Standard English Proficiency Program?
Oakland Superintendent Responds to Critics of the Ebonics Policy
Linguistic Society of America Resolution on Ebonics
What Go Round Come Round: King in Perspective
Opening Pandora's Box: an Interview with Oakland School Board Member Toni Cook
An Oakland Student Speaks Out
Ebonics and the Role of the Community: an Interview with Activist Isaac Taggert
Personal Essays
Official Language, Unofficial Reality: Acquiring Biligual/ Bicultural Fluency in a Segregated Southern Community
Black English: Steppin Up? Lookin Back
Resources on Ebonies
Clarifying Terminology
Notes and References
Notes
References
References
Note
References
References
References
References
References
References
References
Contributors
Credits
Acknowledgments

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