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Breaking into Acting for Dummies�

ISBN-10: 0764554468
ISBN-13: 9780764554469
Edition: 2002
List price: $21.99 Buy it from $3.00
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Description: This is a guide for every actor looking to pursue his or her dreams of an acting career. It will help readers understand how show business works, who the decision-makers are, and what their roles are in picking talent. Readers will learn how to  More...

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Book details

List price: $21.99
Copyright year: 2002
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated
Publication date: 8/22/2002
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 360
Size: 7.50" wide x 9.25" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.144
Language: English

This is a guide for every actor looking to pursue his or her dreams of an acting career. It will help readers understand how show business works, who the decision-makers are, and what their roles are in picking talent. Readers will learn how to promote themselves through getting headshots and making resumes, etc.

Larry Garrison is the president of SilverCreek Entertainment and served as executive producer for the television series Caught in the Act and the CBS movie Like Mother, Like Son . Garrison has produced and consulted for 20/20 , Primetime , Dateline , 60 Minutes , and many other news shows. He is a New York Times best-selling author whose titles include Aruba and Breaking into Acting for Dummies.

Wallace Wang is the author of several best-selling computer books, including My New Mac, My New iPhone, and Steal This Computer Book (all No Starch Press). He is also a successful standup comic who has appeared on A&E's "Evening at the Improv" and appears regularly at the Riviera Comedy Club in Las Vegas.

Introduction
About This Book
How to Use This Book
Conventions Used in This Book
Foolish Assumptions
How This Book Is Organized
Icons Used in This Book
Where to Go from Here
Figuring Out the Business of Acting
Opening the Door to Show Business
Understanding the World of Acting
What You Need to Succeed
An attention-grabbing head shot
A five-star acting resume
Polished talent
Taking Your First Steps in Show Business
Marketing yourself
Finding your first ally: An agent
Showcasing your talent: Auditioning
The Many Ways to Make Money as an Actor
Managing Money (A Little or a Lot)
Knowing What to Expect from an Acting Career
Discovering How Show Business Really Works
The Business of Show Business
Taking It "From the Top"--It All Begins with an Idea
Selling an Idea
Producing a Script
Going into Production
It's Showtime!
Cleaning Up in Post-Production
Distributing the Product
From Agents to Unions: Introducing the Movers and Shakers of Show Business
Producers: The Champions of Every Project
Directors: The Bosses on the Set
Writers: The Idea Makers
The Studios: The Ones Who Make It All Possible
Financing a project
Marketing and distributing a project
Casting Directors: The Gatekeepers
Agents: Your Door to Show Business
Personal and Business Managers: The Guiding Forces Behind the Scenes
Actors: The Talent in Front of the Spotlight
Unions: An Actor's Best Friend
The Screen Actor's Guild (SAG)
Actors' Equity Association
American Federation of Television & Radio Artists (AFTRA)
Packaging and Marketing Yourself
Making a Great First Impression with a Head Shot
Introducing the Head Shot: An Actor's Calling Card
Examining Variations on the Standard
The commercial head shot
The theatrical shot
Creating the Perfect Head Shot
Hiring a professional photographer
Picking the right look
Making the most of your photo session
Getting Your Head Shot Ready
Adding (or eliminating) borders
Including your name and contact info
Choosing a finish for your head shot
Duplicating your head shot
Publicizing Your Head Shot with a Twist
Distributing Your Head Shot
Avoiding Problems with Head Shots
Is that really you?
Your head shot doesn't match your personality
Don't be "cute" or "funny" (or naked)
Technical problems: You look great but your head shot still stinks
Creating a Five-Star Acting Resume
Tackling the Basics of Creating a Resume
Identifying the Info to Include
Your name, union membership, and contact information
Your physical description
Your acting experience and education
Your knowledge of special skills
Avoiding Resume No-Nos
Examining Sample Resumes
The beginner's resume
The intermediate actor's resume
The veteran's resume
Customizing Your Resume for the Part
Training to Improve Your Acting Skills
Mastering the Art of Auditioning: Taking Classes
Benefiting from an auditioning class
Advancing your auditioning skills
Improving Your Performing Skills
Stand-up comedy workshops
Improvisation classes
Speech and accent coaching
Singing and dancing lessons
Developing Physical Fitness Skills
Improving Your Unique Skills
Taking Your First Steps into Show Business
Getting Seen by the Industry: Promoting Yourself
Looking for Your Own Work
Use the actors' unions
Network to stay in touch
Scan trade publications
Browse the Internet
Contact casting directors on your own
Advertising Yourself
Showcasing Yourself
Finding and Working with an Agent
Getting the Ball Rolling
Discovering potential agents
Contacting potential agents
Calling for an appointment
Interviewing with a Prospective Agent
Preparing for your interview
Arriving for your interview
Conducting yourself during your interview
Ending the interview
Signing On with an Agent
Working with Your Agent
Staying in touch
Following your agent's advice
Sharing audition information with your agent
Leaving Your Agent
Reasons to leave your agent
How to leave your agent
Auditioning
Looking at Types of Auditions
Going to open casting calls (cattle calls)
Attending casting auditions
Preparing for an Audition
Planning for the audition
Deciding what to wear
Arriving at the Audition
Impressing a Casting Director
Auditioning: What to Expect
Speaking your lines
Minding your auditioning manners
Making your exit
Preparing for the Next Audition
Sending out thank-you cards
Evaluating yourself
Getting on with your life
Hoping for the Best that Can Happen: The Callback
Dealing with Rejection
Scoping Out the Markets
Acting in Film and Television
Landing a Job
Film and Television Acting Versus Theater Acting
Fine-Tuning Your Performance on Film
Playing to the camera
Acting consistently with different takes
Successfully acting scenes out of order
Hitting your mark
Recognizing different shots
Dealing with close-ups
Performing on a Set
A typical day on the set
What to do when your scene's done
Participating in Post-production: Looping
Gaining Experience and Exposure by Working in Different Markets
Options in the film market
Options in the TV market
Acting in Commercials
Understanding How a Commercial Gets Made
Preparing for a Career in Commercials
Taking a class or workshop
Studying working actors
Hiring a commercial agent
Auditioning for a Commercial Role
Fitting the part
Preparing your part
Handling yourself during the audition
Recognizing Commercial Patterns to Improve Your Performance
The slice-of-life commercial
The spokesperson commercial
The dialogue-less commercial
Understanding the Market for Commercials
Acting in Theater
Mastering Your Skills Onstage
Gearing Up for a Theatrical Career
The academic route
The pounding-the-pavement route
Auditioning for Theater
Familiarizing Yourself with Stage Types
Proscenium stages
Thrust stages
Arena stages
Rehearsing for a Play
Read-through
Blocking with stage directions
Scene work
Work-throughs
Run-throughs
Technical rehearsals
Dress rehearsals
Working in Different Markets
Performing Without Being Seen: Voice-Over Acting
What You Need to Succeed in Voice-Over Acting
What's that you say? Speaking clearly
Polly want a cracker? Voice versatility
Testing...testing: Playing to the microphone
Training for a Voice-Over Career
Finding Voice-Over Work
Preparing Your Demo Tape
Including all the right stuff
Laying down the tracks
Recording subsequent demo tapes
Getting an Agent
Auditioning for Voice-Over Work
Getting Paid as a Voice-Over Actor
Working as an Extra
Delving into the Glamorous World of an Extra
Recognizing types of extras
Getting work as an extra
Examining a day in the life of an extra
Appreciating the Advantages of Being an Extra
Investigating the technical business of show business
Studying the acting side of filmmaking
Networking with fellow actors
Making a little (emphasis on "little") money
Advancing Your Career Beyond an Extra
Getting Your Kid into Show Biz
Considering the Commitment
Does your kid really want to do this?
Do you really want to do this?
Setting goals for you and your child
Exploring the Acting Options
Print ads
TV commercials
Film and TV shows
Theater
The Business of Child Actors
Getting started as a proud parent of a child actor
Procuring the paperwork
Watching out for your child's welfare
Restricting time on the set
Educating on the set
Managing all that money
Helping Your Child Deal with the Ups and Downs of Show Business
Managing Your Money as an Actor
Don't Get Ripped Off! Avoiding Con Games, Scams, and Self-Destruction
Identifying the Elements of a Con Game
The hook: baiting the suckers
The line: exploiting your trust
The sinker: taking your money
Exposing Common Show Business Con Games
Fake screen tests
Phony agents
Shoddy photographers
Worthless acting schools
Sleazy casting directors
Useless 1-900 casting hotlines
Meaningless beauty pageants
Shady get-rich-quick schemes
Dealing with Dishonesty
Potential problems with non-union productions
Unscrupulous business managers
Casting and networking parties
Missing residuals
Protect Yourself: Beating the Con at His Own Game
Being Your Own Worst Enemy
Dealing with drug abuse
Separating sex from show business
Dealing with alcohol addiction
Curbing excessive spending
Avoiding criminal activities
Handling emotional and psychological problems
Working to Pay Your Bills Until You Hit It Big
Deciding Between a Full-time and a Part-time Job
Getting temporary work
Getting full or part-time work
Working for Yourself
Getting a Job That Pays You to Be Entertaining
Teaching traffic school
Performing on the street
Amusing patrons at an amusement park
Entertaining the kiddies
Catering to the acting crowd
Working in a film or television studio
Perusing scripts for payment
Winning big on a game show
Do a song and dance in a casino
Performing on a cruise ship
Acting in an interactive play
Becoming a professional reader during auditions
Getting "extra" time in the studio
Managing Your Finances
Handling Your Money
Saving it!
Dealing with income texes
Digging yourself out of debt
Investing your earnings
Living Well Without Going Broke
Dealing with housing expenses
Eating cheaply
Buying clothes
Deciding When to Quit Your Day Job
The Part of Tens
Ten Myths of Show Business
Show Business Is Closed to Outsiders
It's Who You Know, Not What You Know
Only the Young and the Beautiful Get Work
You Have to Move to L.A., London, or New York to Succeed
Plastic Surgery and Body Implants Get You Work
You Have to Sacrifice Your Principles
You Can Break into Show Business by Taking Off Your Clothes
The myth of posing nude
The myth of sleeping with someone famous or powerful
The myth of appearing in adult movies
You Can Be "Discovered" and Made into a Star
The Right Agent/Manager/Coach Can Get You Work
Show Business Will Destroy You
Ten Traits of Successful Actors
Respecting Other People's Time
Planning Ahead
Being Flexible and Adaptable
Being Professional
How a professional actor behaves
Acting professionally with your agent
Acting professionally with casting directors
Acting professionally on the set
Being Yourself
Being Well-Groomed
Being Persistent
Avoiding Mind-Altering Substances
Being Willing to Learn and Improve Yourself
Believing in Yourself
Ten Tips for Improving as an Actor
Mastering the Art of Auditioning
Knowing How to Audition and Act for the Camera
Auditioning for the camera
Acting for the camera
Expecting the Unexpected: Improvising
Developing a Sense of Humor
Overcoming Stage Fright
Understanding Human Psychology
Developing Your Voice and Improving Your Body
Your voice
Your body
Maintaining a Reliable Source of Income
Avoiding Guaranteed Failure
Staying Sharp
Ten Ways to Act Just for the Fun of It
Join a Community Theater Group
Become a Storyteller
Join an Improvisational Group
Volunteer at Your Local School Drama Department
Put on a Play for a Charity
Appear in a Student Film
Work as an Extra
Volunteer at Your Local Museum
Appear on Public Access TV
Produce Your Own Show on the Internet
Index

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