Graphic Discovery A Trout in the Milk and Other Visual Adventures

ISBN-10: 0691134057
ISBN-13: 9780691134055
Edition: 2005
Authors: Howard Wainer
List price: $37.50 Buy it from $3.00
This item qualifies for FREE shipping

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee

If an item you ordered from TextbookRush does not meet your expectations due to an error on our part, simply fill out a return request and then return it by mail within 30 days of ordering it for a full refund of item cost.

Learn more about our returns policy

Description: Good graphs make complex problems clear. From the weather forecast to the Dow Jones average, graphs are so ubiquitous today that it is hard to imagine a world without them. Yet they are a modern invention. This book is the first to comprehensively  More...

New Starting from $42.15
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
coins
coins
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!
You could win $10,000

Get an entry for every item you buy, rent, or sell.

Study Briefs

Limited time offer: Get the first one free! (?)

All the information you need in one place! Each Study Brief is a summary of one specific subject; facts, figures, and explanations to help you learn faster.

Add to cart
Study Briefs
Periodic Table Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
Calculus 1 Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
Algebra Online content $4.95 $1.99

Customers also bought

Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading

Book details

List price: $37.50
Copyright year: 2005
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Publication date: 10/21/2007
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 208
Size: 7.50" wide x 10.00" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 1.034
Language: English

Good graphs make complex problems clear. From the weather forecast to the Dow Jones average, graphs are so ubiquitous today that it is hard to imagine a world without them. Yet they are a modern invention. This book is the first to comprehensively plot humankind's fascinating efforts to visualize data, from a key seventeenth-century precursor--England's plague-driven initiative to register vital statistics--right up to the latest advances. In a highly readable, richly illustrated story of invention and inventor that mixes science and politics, intrigue and scandal, revolution and shopping, Howard Wainer validates Thoreau's observation that circumstantial evidence can be quite convincing, as when you find a trout in the milk. The story really begins with the eighteenth-century origins of the art, logic, and methods of data display, which emerged, full-grown, in William Playfair's landmark 1786 trade atlas of England and Wales. The remarkable Scot singlehandedly popularized the atheoretical plotting of data to reveal suggestive patterns--an achievement that foretold the graphic explosion of the nineteenth century, with atlases published across the observational sciences as the language of science moved from words to pictures. Next come succinct chapters illustrating the uses and abuses of this marvelous invention more recently, from a murder trial in Connecticut to the Vietnam War's effect on college admissions. Finally Wainer examines the great twentieth-century polymath John Wilder Tukey's vision of future graphic displays and the resultant methods--methods poised to help us make sense of the torrent of data in our information-laden world.

Preface
Introduction
William Playfair and the Origins of Graphical Display
Why Playfair?
All of the pieces were in place for the invention of statistical graphics long before Playfair was born. Why didn't anyone else invent them? Why did Playfair?
Who Was Playfair?
Playfair (1759-1823) was an inventor and ardent advocate of statistical graphics Ian Spence Howard Wainer William
Here we tell a bit about his life
William Playfair
A Daring Worthless Fellow 24 Ian Spence Howard Wainer
Audacity was an important personality trait for the invention of graphics because the inventor had to move counter to the Cartesian approach to science
We illustrate this quality in Playfair by describing his failed attempt to blackmail one of the richest lords of Great Britain
Scaling the Heights (and Widths) 28 The message conveyed by a statistical graphic can be distorted by manipulating the aspect ratio, the ratio of a graph's width to its height
Playfair deployed this ability in a masterly way, providing a guide to future display technology
A Priestley View of International Currency Exchanges
A recent plot of the operating hours of international currency exchanges confuses matters terribly
Why? We find that when we use a different graphical form, developed Joseph Priestley in 1765, the structure becomes clear
We also learn how Priestley discovered the latent graphicacy in his (and our) audiences
Tom's Veggies and the American Way
European intellectuals were not the only ones graphing data
During a visit to Paris (and prompted by letters from, Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson) learned of this invention and he later put it to a more practical use than the depiction of the life spans of heroes from classical antiquity
The Graphical Inventions of Dubourg and Ferguson: Two Precursors to William Playfair
Although he developed the line chart independently, Priestley was not the first to do so
The earliest seems to be the Parisian physician Jacques Barbeau-Dubourg (1709-1779), who created a wonderful graphical scroll in 1753
Graphical representation must have been in the air, for the Scottish philosopher Adam Ferguson (1723-1816) added his version of time lines to the mix in 1780
Winds across Europe: Francis Galton and the Graphic Discovery of Weather Patterns
In 1861, Francis Galton organized weather observatories throughout Western Europe to gather data in a standardized way
He organized these data and presented them as a series of ninety-three maps and charts, from which he confirmed the existence of the anticyclonic movement of winds around a low-pressure zone
Using Graphical Displays to Understand the Modern World
A Graphical Investigation of the Scourge of Vietnam
During the Vietnam War, average SAT scores went down for those students who were not in the military
In addition, the average ASVAB scores (the test used by the military to classify all members of the military) also declined
This Lake Wobegon-like puzzle is solved graphically
Two Mind-Bending Statistical Paradoxes
The odd phenomenon observed with test scores during the Vietnam War is not unusual
We illustrate this seeming paradox with other instances, show how to avoid them, and then discuss an even subtler statistical pitfall that has entrapped many illustrious would-be data analysts. Ch

×
Free shipping on orders over $35*

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

Learn more about the TextbookRush Marketplace.

×