Large-Scale Structure of the Universe

ISBN-10: 0691082405

ISBN-13: 9780691082400

Edition: 1981

Authors: P. J. E. Peebles

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Description:

Opinions on the large-scale structure of the early universe range widely from primeval chaos to a well-ordered mass distribution. P.J.E. Peebles argues that the evolution proceeded from a nearly uniform initial state to a progressively more irregular and clumpy universe. The discussion centers on the largest known structures, the clusters of galaxies, the empirical evidence of the nature of the clustering, and the theories of how the clustering evolves in an expanding universe. In Chapter One the author provides an historical introduction to the subject. Chapter Two contains a survey of methods used to deal with the Newtonian approximation to the theory of the evolution of the mass distribution. Recent progress in the use of statistical measures of the clustering is described in Chapter Three. Chapters Four and Five return to techniques for dealing with cosmic evolution, in the statistical measures of clustering and under general relativity theory. Lastly, in Chapter Six Professor Peebles assesses the progress in attempts to link theory and observation to arrive at a well established physical picture of the nature and evolution of the universe.
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Book details

List price: $95.00
Copyright year: 1981
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Publication date: 11/21/1980
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 440
Size: 6.50" wide x 9.50" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.342
Language: English

Preface
Acknowledgments
Homogeneity and Clustering
Homogeneity and clustering
Is the universe homogeneous?
Physical principles
How did galaxies and clusters of galaxies form?
Summary
Behavior of Irregularities in the Distribution of Matter: Newtonian Approximation
Newtonian approximation
Particle dynamics in expanding coordinates
The peculiar acceleration
Two models: the Vlasov equation and the ideal fluid
Linear perturbation approximation for [delta]
Solutions for [delta](t): p = [Lambda] = 0
Solutions for [delta](t): effect of a uniform radiation background
Solutions for [delta](t): models with [Lambda not equal] 0
The peculiar velocity field
Joining conditions for [delta] and [upsilon]
Critical Jeans length
Primeval magnetic field as a source for [delta rho] / [rho]
Second order perturbation theory for [delta rho] / [rho]
Spherical model
Homogeneous ellipsoid model
Caustics and pancakes
Expansion, vorticity, and shear
Origin of the rotation of galaxies
Cosmic energy equation
Spherical accretion model
Hierarchical clustering model
Fourier transform of the equations of motion
Coupling of density fluctuations
n-Point Correlation Functions: Descriptive Statistics
Statistical measures of the galaxy distribution
Fair sample hypothesis
Two-point spatial correlation function [xi](r)
Two-point correlation function: another definition
Two-point correlation function: Poisson model
Three-point correlation function
Four-point correlation function
Moments of counts of objects
Constraints on [xi] and [zeta]
Probability generating function
Estimates of P[subscript N]
Cluster model
Power spectrum
Power law model for the spectrum
Bispectrum
Cross correlation function
Angular two-point correlation function
Angular power spectrum
Estimating w([theta])
Statistical uncertainty in the estimate of w([theta])
Relation between angular and spatial two-point correlation functions
Small separation approximation and the scaling relation
Decoupling of magnitude and position
Relation between [xi] and w: some examples
Inversion of the equation
Angular three-point correlation function
Angular four-point correlation function
Correction for curvature and expansion
Summary of numerical results
Power spectrum of the extragalactic light
Moments of the number of neighbors
Model for P[subscript N]
Clustering models
Continuous clustering hierarchy: Mandelbrot's prescription
The mass correlation functions
Clustering hierarchy: continuity speculation
Remarks on the observations
Dynamics and Statistics
Goals
Definitions of variables and distribution functions
BBGKY hierarchy equations
Fluid limit
Evolution of the integral of [xi]
Particle conservation equations
Relative peculiar velocity dispersion
Similarity solution
Cosmic energy equation
Cosmic virial theorem
Joint distribution in position and velocity
Behavior of the halo around a cluster of galaxies
Superclusters
Problems and prospects
Relativistic Theory of the Behavior of Irregularities in an Expanding World Model
Role of the relativistic theory
Time-orthogonal coordinates
The field equations for h[subscript alpha beta]
Gravitational waves
Newtonian approximation
Linear perturbation equations for the matter
Behavior of density perturbations at wavelength [characters not reproducible] ct
Spherical model
Evolution of acoustic waves
Nonlinear acoustic waves
Incompressible flow
Behavior of collisionless particles
Linear dissipation of adiabatic perturbations
Residual fluctuations in the microwave background
Isothermal perturbations
Scenarios
Nature of the universe at high redshift
Nature of protogalaxies and protoclusters
Appendix
Models and notation
List of Abbreviations
References
Index
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