Livre Brule

ISBN-10: 0691059209
ISBN-13: 9780691059204
Edition: 1998
List price: $55.00 Buy it from $13.54
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Description: In a profound look at what it means for new generations to read and interpret ancient religious texts, rabbi and philosopher Marc-Alain Ouaknin offers a postmodern reading of the Talmud, one of the first of its kind. Combining traditional learning  More...

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Book details

List price: $55.00
Copyright year: 1998
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Publication date: 5/31/1998
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 272
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.25" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.386
Language: English

In a profound look at what it means for new generations to read and interpret ancient religious texts, rabbi and philosopher Marc-Alain Ouaknin offers a postmodern reading of the Talmud, one of the first of its kind. Combining traditional learning and contemporary thought, Ouaknin dovetails discussions of spirituality and religious practice with such concepts as deconstruction, intertextuality, undecidability, multiple voicing, and eroticism in the Talmud. On a broader level, he establishes a dialogue between Hebrew tradition and the social sciences, which draws, for example, on the works of Leacute;vinas, Blanchot, and Jabegrave;s as well as Derrida.The Burnt Bookrepresents the innovative thinking that has come to be associated with a school of French Jewish studies, headed by Leacute;vinas and dedicated to new readings of traditional texts, which is fast gaining influence in the United States. The Talmud, transcribed in 500 C.E., is shown to be a text that refrains from dogma and instead encourages the exploration of its meanings. A vast compilation of Jewish oral law, the Talmud also contains rabbinical commentaries that touch on everything from astronomy to household life. Examining its literary methods and internal logic, Ouaknin explains how this text allows readers to transcend its authority in that it invites them to interpret, discuss, and re-create their religious tradition. An in-depth treatment of selected texts from the oral law and commentary goes on to provide a model for secular study of the Talmud in light of contemporary philosophical issues. Throughout the author emphasizes the self-effacing quality of a text whose worth can be measured by the insights that live on in the minds of its interpreters long after they have closed the book. He points out that the burning of the Talmud in anti-Judaic campaigns throughout history has, in fact, been an unwitting act of complicity with Talmudic philosophy and the practice of self-effacement. Ouaknin concludes his discussion with the story of the Hasidic master Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav, who himself burned his life achievement--a work known by his students as "the Burnt Book." This story leaves us with the question, should all books be destroyed in order to give birth to thought and renew meaning?

Preface
Acknowledgments
Talmudic Landmarks
Revelation and Transmission
Transcription
The Talmudic Masters: The Schools
The Post-Talmudic Period
Jurisprudence Derived from the Talmud
Interpretation
Dialogues
Openings First Opening: What Is a Book? or, The Story of an Effacing Translation Remarks on the Translation: Legible and Illegible Commentary
The Two Nunim
The Story of the Nunim
Dots, Coronets, and Letters
The Structure of the Text
An Atopian Text
The Book: The Verse's Beyond
An Open Work
The Talmid Hakham and the Wise Man: Hokhmah and Wisdom
The Book and the "Manual"
Time and Interpretation
Violence and Interpretation Second Opening: Visible and Invisible; or, Eroticism and Transcendence Translation Layout of the Commentary
First Part (A)
Architecture
Visible and Invisible: The Contradiction
Different Modes of Perception of Revelation
The Parokhet: The Text, the "Trace"
New Faces
Confronted with the Text
The "There" and the Name
Second Part (B)
The Structure of the Text
An Erotic Image
Eroticism and Transcendence
Eroticism and Prophecy
Third Part (C)
Invisible Faces
The Double Gaze
Seeing and Death
The Body beyond the Body
The "Burnt Book"
Glossary of Hebrew Words Used in This Work
Bibliography
Index

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