Truth V. Justice The Morality of Truth Commissions

ISBN-10: 0691050724
ISBN-13: 9780691050720
Edition: 2000
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Description: The truth commission is an increasingly common fixture of newly democratic states with repressive or strife-ridden pasts. From South Africa to Haiti, truth commissions are at work with varying degrees of support and success. To many, they are the  More...

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Book details

List price: $47.95
Copyright year: 2000
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Publication date: 8/27/2000
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 344
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.50" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.122
Language: English

The truth commission is an increasingly common fixture of newly democratic states with repressive or strife-ridden pasts. From South Africa to Haiti, truth commissions are at work with varying degrees of support and success. To many, they are the best--or only--way to achieve a full accounting of crimes committed against fellow citizens and to prevent future conflict. Others question whether a restorative justice that sets the guilty free, that cleanses society by words alone, can deter future abuses and allow victims and their families to heal. Here, leading philosophers, lawyers, social scientists, and activists representing several perspectives look at the process of truth commissioning in general and in post-apartheid South Africa. They ask whether the truth commission, as a method of seeking justice after conflict, is fair, moral, and effective in bringing about reconciliation.The authors weigh the virtues and failings of truth commissions, especially the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission, in their attempt to provide restorative rather than retributive justice. They examine, among other issues, the use of reparations as social policy and the granting of amnesty in exchange for testimony. Most of the contributors praise South Africa's decision to trade due process for the kinds of truth that permit closure. But they are skeptical that such revelations produce reconciliation, particularly in societies that remain divided after a compromise peace with no single victor, as in El Salvador. Ultimately, though, they find the truth commission to be a worthy if imperfect instrument for societies seeking to say "never again" with confidence. At a time when truth commissions have been proposed for Bosnia, Kosovo, Cyprus, East Timor, Cambodia, Nigeria, Palestine, and elsewhere, the authors' conclusion that restorative justice provides positive gains could not be more important.In addition to the editors, the contributors are Amy Gutmann, Rajeev Bhargava, Elizabeth Kiss, David A. Crocker, Andr du Toit, Alex Boraine, Dumisa Ntsebeza, Lisa Kois, Ronald C. Slye, Kent Greenawalt, Sanford Levinson, Martha Minow, Charles S. Maier, Charles Villa-Vicencio, and Wilhelm Verwoerd.

Acknowledgments
Truth Commissions and the Provision of Truth, Justice, and Reconciliation
The Moral Foundations of Truth Commissions
Restoring Decency to Barbaric Societies
Moral Ambition Within and Beyond Political Constraints: Reflections on Restorative Justice
Truth Commissions, Transitional Justice, and Civil Society
The Moral Foundations of the South African TRC: Truth as Acknowledgment and Justice as Recognition
Truth and Reconciliation in South Africa: The Third Way
The Uses of Truth Commissions: Lessons for the World
Amnesty, Truth, and Reconciliation: Reflections on the South African Amnesty Process
Amnesty's Justice
Trials, Commissions, and Investigating Committees: The Elusive Search for Norms of Due Process
The Hope for Healing: What Can Truth Commissions Do?
Doing History, Doing Justice: The Narrative of the Historian and of the Truth Commission
Constructing a Report: Writing Up the "Truth"
The Contributors
Index

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