Ecology and Evolution of Darwin's Finches

ISBN-10: 0691048665
ISBN-13: 9780691048666
Edition: 1987 (Revised)
List price: $41.00
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Description: This text looks at how much has been learnt about the Darwin's Finch since Darwin's initial observations. It shows how interspecific competition and natural selection produce observable and measurable evolutionary change.

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Book details

List price: $41.00
Copyright year: 1987
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Publication date: 12/27/1999
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 512
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.50" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 1.628
Language: English

This text looks at how much has been learnt about the Darwin's Finch since Darwin's initial observations. It shows how interspecific competition and natural selection produce observable and measurable evolutionary change.

Jonathan Weiner is an artist whose work has been exhibited in galleries across the United States. A graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design, he lives in New York City.

Foreword
Preface to the 1999 Edition
Preface
Introduction
Charles Darwin
After Darwin
The first synthesis
Evolutionary inference
Plan of the book
Characteristics of the Islands
Origins and ages
Distribution and sizes
Climate
Plants, 2Z Vegetation
Changes in the past
Changes in recent times
Cocos Island
Summary
General Characteristics and Distributions of Finches
The main groups
Genera
Species
Subspecies
Distributions
Patterns among the islands
Extinctions
Other land birds
Summary
Patterns of Morphological Variation
Introduction
The major simple patterns
The minor simple patterns
Correlations between traits
Size
Allometry
Shape
Multivariate shape variation
Geographical variation in size
Summary
Growth and Development
Introduction
Variation in egg size
Absolute growth
Relative growth
Summary
Beak Sizes, Beak Shapes, and Diets
Introduction
Feeding mechanics
Feeding types
Ecological significance of beak differences between species
Dietary differences between species
Dietary differences between populations of the same species
Dietary differences among individuals in a variable population
Summary
The Importance of Food to Finch Populations
Introduction
Plant phenology in the and zone
Finch phenology
Finch populations in relation to food supply
Extreme conditions
Food limitation of population sizes
The frequency of food limitation
Other factors limiting finch populations
Interspecific competition for food
Summary
Population Variation and Natural Selection
Introduction
Relative variation
Theoretical background
Field studies
Genetic variation
Natural selection
Sexual selection
Countervailing selection
A summary of selection pressures
Sexual dimorphism
Genetic drift
Enhancement of genetic variation
Variation in relation to abundance, 20Z Other species
Summary
Species-Recognition and Mate Choice
Introduction
The possible cues used in species-recognition
Morphological cues
Song
Song and bill morphology as species cues
Imprinting
The learning of heterotypic song
Misimprinting
Beyond species-recognition: mate choice
Summary
Evolution and Speciation
Evolution
Origins
The number of species
The pattern of speciation
The time framework
Allopatric speciation
Alternative models of speciation
Parapatric speciation
Sympatric speciation
Alternatives to gradual genetic change
Conclusions and summary
Ecological Interactions during Speciation
Introduction
Ecological isolation
Causes of initial differentiation
An alternative view
Differentiation entirely in allopatry
The food supply hypothesis
Lack's evidence for competition
Tests of the competition hypothesis
Different explanations reconciled
Conclusions and summary
Competition and Finch Communities
Introduction
Combinations of species
Structure determined by competition
Minimum differences between coexisting species
Greater than minimum differences
A digression on methods of analysis, and on bias
Predictive models
The classical case of character release
Conclusions and summary
The Evolution of Reproductive Isolation
Introduction
Experimental tests
Implications of the experimental results
Reinforcement?
Absence of speciesfrom islands
Summary
Adapta

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