Catullus, Tibullus, and Pervigilium Veneris

ISBN-10: 0674990072
ISBN-13: 9780674990074
Edition: 2nd 1962 (Revised)
List price: $26.00
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Description: Catullus (Gaius Valerius, 84-54 BC), of Verona, went early to Rome, where he associated not only with other literary men from Cisalpine Gaul but also with Cicero and Hortensius. His surviving poems consist of nearly sixty short lyrics, eight longer  More...

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Book details

List price: $26.00
Edition: 2nd
Copyright year: 1962
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Publication date: 1/1/1913
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 400
Size: 4.75" wide x 6.75" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.594

Catullus (Gaius Valerius, 84-54 BC), of Verona, went early to Rome, where he associated not only with other literary men from Cisalpine Gaul but also with Cicero and Hortensius. His surviving poems consist of nearly sixty short lyrics, eight longer poems in various metres, and almost fifty epigrams. All exemplify a strict technique of studied composition inherited from early Greek lyric and the poets of Alexandria. In his work we can trace his unhappy love for a woman he calls Lesbia; the death of his brother; his visits to Bithynia; and his emotional friendships and enmities at Rome. For consummate poetic artistry coupled with intensity of feeling Catullus's poems have no rival in Latin literature. Tibullus (Albius, ca. 54-19 BC), of equestrian rank and a friend of Horace, enjoyed the patronage of Marcus Valerius Messalla Corvinus, whom he several times apostrophizes. Three books of elegies have come down to us under his name, of which only the first two are authentic. Book 1 mostly proclaims his love for 'Delia', Book 2 his passion for 'Nemesis'. The third book consists of a miscellany of poems from the archives of Messalla; it is very doubtful whether any come from the pen of Tibullus himself. But a special interest attaches to a group of them which concern a girl called Sulpicia: some of the poems are written by her lover Cerinthus, while others purport to be her own composition. The Pervigilium Veneris, a poem of not quite a hundred lines celebrating a spring festival in honour of the goddess of love, is remarkable both for its beauty and as the first clear note of romanticism which transformed classical into medieval literature. The manuscripts give no clue to its author, but recent scholarship has made a strong case for attributing it to the early fourth-century poet Tiberianus.

Thought to have been born in or near Verona, Italy, in 84 B.C., Gaius Valerius Catullus came from significant wealth and connections. Motivated by his older brother, Catullus started writing poetry as a young boy. The genuine extant works of Catullus consists of 113 poems on a variety of subjects composed in different styles and meters. Catullus was capable of writing some of the most polished and enchanting poems. His relationship with a married woman was interwoven in many of his love poems with the creation of a character named Lesbia. Nowadays, Catullus's love poetry is considered among the best and most influential. Catullus's poems were widely appreciated by other poets. He greatly influenced poets such as Ovid, Horace, and Virgil. After his rediscovery in the late Middle Ages, Catullus again found admirers. His explicit writing style has shocked many readers. Catullus probably died in 54 B.C. at the age of 30.

Reviser's
Note Catullus Tibullus Pervigilium Veneris
Index To Catullus
Index To Tibullus
Appendix On Metres

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