Mind and World

ISBN-10: 0674576101
ISBN-13: 9780674576100
Edition: 2nd 1996
List price: $32.00 Buy it from $16.51
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Description: Modern Philosophy finds it difficult to give a satisfactory picture of the place of minds in the world. In Mind and World, based on the 1991 John Locke Lectures, one of the most distinguished philosophers writing today offers his diagnosis of this  More...

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Book details

List price: $32.00
Edition: 2nd
Copyright year: 1996
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Publication date: 9/1/1996
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 218
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.50" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.902
Language: English

Modern Philosophy finds it difficult to give a satisfactory picture of the place of minds in the world. In Mind and World, based on the 1991 John Locke Lectures, one of the most distinguished philosophers writing today offers his diagnosis of this difficulty and points to a cure. In doing so, he delivers the most complete and ambitious statement to date of his own views, a statement that no one concerned with the future of philosophy can afford to ignore. John McDowell amply illustrates a major problem of modern philosophy--the insidious persistence of dualism--in his discussion of empirical thought. Much as we would like to conceive empirical thought as rationally grounded in experience, pitfalls await anyone who tries to articulate this position, and McDowell exposes these traps by exploiting the work of contemporary philosophers from Wilfrid Sellars to Donald Davidson. These difficulties, he contends, reflect an understandable--but surmountable--failure to see how we might integrate what Sellars calls the logical space of reasons" into the natural world. What underlies this impasse is a conception of nature that has certain attractions for the modern age, a conception that McDowell proposes to put aside, thus circumventing these philosophical difficulties. By returning to a pre-modern conception of nature but retaining the intellectual advance of modernity that has mistakenly been viewed as dislodging it, he makes room for a fully satisfying conception of experience as a rational openness to independent reality. This approach also overcomes other obstacles that impede a generally satisfying understanding of how we are placed in the world.

John McDowell is University Professor of Philosophy at the University of Pittsburgh.

Preface
Introduction
Concepts and Intuitions
The Unboundedness of the Conceptual
Non-conceptual Content
Reason and Nature
Action, Meaning, and the Self
Rational and Other Animals
Afterword
Davidson in Context
Postscript to Lecture
Postscript to Lecture
Postscript to Lecture
Index

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