John Keats Complete Poems

ISBN-10: 0674154312
ISBN-13: 9780674154315
Edition: 1982
List price: $31.00 Buy it from $6.35
30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee

If an item you ordered from TextbookRush does not meet your expectations due to an error on our part, simply fill out a return request and then return it by mail within 30 days of ordering it for a full refund of item cost.

Learn more about our returns policy

Description: Here is the first reliable edition of Keats's complete poems designed expressly for general readers and students. Upon its publication in 1978, Stillinger's The Poems of John Keats won exceptionally high praise: "The definitive Keats," proclaimed  More...

Used Starting from $16.12
New Starting from $24.11
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
coins
coins
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!
You could win $10,000

Get an entry for every item you buy, rent, or sell.

Study Briefs

Limited time offer: Get the first one free! (?)

All the information you need in one place! Each Study Brief is a summary of one specific subject; facts, figures, and explanations to help you learn faster.

Add to cart
Study Briefs
Italian Grammar Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
Portuguese Grammar Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
Spanish Grammar Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
German Grammar Online content $4.95 $1.99

Customers also bought

Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading

Book details

List price: $31.00
Copyright year: 1982
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Publication date: 1/1/1991
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 526
Size: 5.50" wide x 8.25" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.232
Language: English

Here is the first reliable edition of Keats's complete poems designed expressly for general readers and students. Upon its publication in 1978, Stillinger's The Poems of John Keats won exceptionally high praise: "The definitive Keats," proclaimed The New Republic--"An authoritative edition embodying the readings the poet himself most probably intended, prepared by the leading scholar in Keats textual studies." Now this scholarship is at last available in a graceful, clear format designed to introduce students and general readers to the "real" Keats. In place of the textual apparatus that was essential to scholars, Stillinger here provides helpful explanatory notes. These notes give dates of composition, identify quotations and allusions, gloss names and words not included in the ordinary desk dictionary, and refer the reader to the best critical interpretations of the poems. The new introduction provides central facts about Keats's life and career, describes the themes of his best work, and speculates on the causes of his greatness.

John Keats was born in London, the oldest of four children, on October 31, 1795. His father, who was a livery-stable keeper, died when Keats was eight years old, and his mother died six years later. At age 15, he was apprenticed to an apothecary-surgeon. In 1815 he began studying medicine but soon gave up that career in favor of writing poetry. The critic Douglas Bush has said that, if one poet could be recalled to life to complete his career, the almost universal choice would be Keats, who now is regarded as one of the three or four supreme masters of the English language. His early work is badly flawed in both technique and critical judgment, but, from his casually written but brilliant letters, one can trace the development of a genius who, through fierce determination in the face of great odds, fashioned himself into an incomparable artist. In his tragically brief career, cut short at age 25 by tuberculosis, Keats constantly experimented, often with dazzling success, and always with steady progress over previous efforts. The unfinished Hyperion is the only English poem after Paradise Lost that is worthy to be called an epic, and it is breathtakingly superior to his early Endymion (1818), written just a few years before. Isabella is a fine narrative poem, but The Eve of St. Agnes (1819), written soon after, is peerless. In Lamia (1819) Keats revived the couplet form, long thought to be dead, in a gorgeous, romantic story. Above all it was in his development of the ode that Keats's supreme achievement lies. In just a few months, he wrote the odes "On a Grecian Urn" (1819), "To a Nightingale" (1819), "To Melancholy" (1819), and the marvelously serene "To Autumn" (1819). Keats is the only romantic poet whose reputation has steadily grown through all changes in critical fashion. Once patronized as a poet of beautiful images but no intellectual content, Keats is now appreciated for his powerful mind, profound grasp of poetic principles, and ceaseless quest for new forms and techniques. For many readers, old and young, Keats is a heroic figure. John Keats died in Rome on February 23, 1821 and was buried in the Protestant Cemetery, Rome. His last request was to be placed under a tombstone bearing no name or date, only the words, "Here lies One whose Name was writ in Water."

Jack Stillinger is Professor of English and a permanent member of the Center for Advanced Study at the University of Illinois.

Introduction
Chronology Imitation of Spenser On Peace Lines Written on 29 May, the Anniversary of Charles's
Restoration, on Hearing the Bells Ringing Stay, ruby breated warbler, stay Fill for me a brimming bowl As from the darkening gloom a silver dove To Lord Byron Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate Written on the Day
That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison To Hope Ode to Apollo To Some Ladies
On Receiving a Curious Shell, and a Copy of Verses, from the Same Ladies O come, dearest Emma! the rose is full blown Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell To George
Felton Mathew Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs Hadst tho liv'd in days of old
I am as brisk Give me women, wine, and snuff Specimen of an Induction to a Poem Calidore: A Fragment To one who has been long in city pent Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve
To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses Happy is England!
I could be content To My Brother George (sonnet)
To My Brother George (epistle)
To Charles Cowden Clarke How many bards gild the lapses of time On First
Looking into Chapman's Homer Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there On
Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour To My Brothers
Addressed to Haydon
Addressed to the Same To G. A. W
To Koscuisko Sleep and Poetry I stoof tip-toe upon a little hill
Written in Disgust of Vulgar
Superstition On the Grasshopper and Cricket After dark vapours have oppressed our plains To a Young Lady
Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd God of the golden bow This pleasant tale is like a little copse To Leigh Hunt, Esq
On Seeing the Elgin Marbles To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on seeing the Elgin Marbles On a Leander
Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me On The Story of Rimini On the Sea Unfelt, unheard, unseen Hither, hither, love You say you love; but with a voice Before he went to live with owls and bats
The Gothic looks solemn O grant that like to Peter I Think not of it, sweet one, so Endymion: A Poetic Reminder In drear nighted December Apollo to the Graces To Mrs
Reynold's Cat Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's
Hair On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again
When I have fears that I may cease to be Lines on the Mermaid
Tavern O blush not so!
O blush not so Hence burgundy, claret, and port God of the meridian Robin Hood Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb To the Nile Spense, a jealous honorer of thine Blue!
'Tis the life of heaven--the domain O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind Extracts from an Opera Four seasons fill the measure of the year For there's
Bishop's Teign Where by ye going, you Devon maid Over the hill and over the dale Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed To J. R. Isabella; or,
The Pot of Basil Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia To Homer Give me your patience, sister, while I frame Sweet, sweet is the greeting of e

×
Free shipping on orders over $35*

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

Learn more about the TextbookRush Marketplace.

×