World Not to Come A History of Latino Writing and Print Culture

ISBN-10: 0674072618
ISBN-13: 9780674072619
Edition: 2013
List price: $41.95 Buy it from $25.62
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Description: A shift of global proportions occurred in May 1808. Napoleon Bonaparte invaded Spain and deposed the Spanish king. Overnight, the Hispanic world was transformed forever. Hispanics were forced to confront modernity, and to look beyond monarchy and  More...

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Book details

List price: $41.95
Copyright year: 2013
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Publication date: 6/14/2013
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 536
Size: 6.50" wide x 9.50" long x 1.50" tall
Weight: 2.134
Language: English

A shift of global proportions occurred in May 1808. Napoleon Bonaparte invaded Spain and deposed the Spanish king. Overnight, the Hispanic world was transformed forever. Hispanics were forced to confront modernity, and to look beyond monarchy and religion for new sources of authority. A World Not to Come focuses on how Spanish Americans in Texas used writing as a means to establish new sources of authority, and how a Latino literary and intellectual life was born in the New World.The geographic locale that became Texas changed sovereignty four times, from Spanish colony to Mexican republic to Texan republic and finally to a U.S. state. Following the trail of manifestos, correspondence, histories, petitions, and periodicals, Raúl Coronado goes to the writings of Texas Mexicans to explore how they began the slow process of viewing the world as no longer being a received order but a produced order. Through reconfigured publics, they debated how best to remake the social fabric even as they were caught up in a whirlwind of wars, social upheaval, and political transformations.Yet, while imagining a new world, Texas Mexicans were undergoing a transformation from an elite community of “civilizing” conquerors to an embattled, pauperized, racialized group whose voices were annihilated by war. In the end, theirs was a world not to come. Coronado sees in this process of racialization the birth of an emergent Latino culture and literature.

Ra�l Coronado is Associate Professor of English at the University of Chicago.

List of Illustrations
Note on Translations
Introduction
Divergent Revolutionary Genealogies
The Traumatic Origins of the Modern World
A History of Latino Textuality
Disenchantment
Becoming Latino
A Spiral Historical Narrative
Imagining New Futures
Anxiously Desiring the Nation: The Skepticism of Scholasticism
The Beginning of the End
Provincial Education
The Scholastic Episteme
Skepticism in the Eastern Interior Provinces of New Spain
Imagining the Nation
"Oh! How Much I Could Say!" Imagining "What a Nation Could Do
Voyage to the United States
Seeing a New Country
Admiring the Well-Being of the Nation
Struggling to Articulate the Sublime
Pursuing Reform and Revolution
Seeking the Pueblo's Happiness: Reform and the Discourse of Political Economy
The Need to Reform the Monarchy
The Discourse of Political Economy as the Vehicle for Greater Happiness
The Shifting Ideologies of Mercantilism to Free-Trade Capitalism
The Commercial Interests of Philadelphia's Early Spanish Diplomats
Early U.S. Hispanic Publications, the Critique of Mercantilism, and the Common Good
Epistemic Shift
From Reform to Revolution: Print Culture and Expanding Social Imaginaries
Communication Networks
Initial Ruptures
The Demise of the Hispanic Monarchy and the Birth of the Modern World
Print Culture and the Eruption of the Public Sphere
Reconfiguring Time and Space
Revolutionizing the Catholic Past
Seduced by Papers: Revolution (as Reformation) in Spanish Texas
Modern Tempests
On the Spanish Texas-Louisiana Border
Revolution as End of the World
Revolution as Seduction
From Patriarchal Respect to Reciprocal Love
Alone with the Hurricane
"We the Pueblo of the Province of Texas": The Philosophy and Brute Reality of Independence
Reading Revolutionary Broadsheets Aloud
The Broadsheets Content
Francisco Su�rez and the Catholic Corpus Mysticum
Revolutionary Catholic Visions of the Modern Political World
Indigenous Literacies
Catholic Republican Government
War and Terror
The Entrance of Life into History
"To the Advocates of Enlightenment and Reason": From Subjects to Citizens
From Spanish Defeat to Mexican Independence
Writing and the Word of the Sovereign
Printing and the Making of Citizens in Postindependence Texas
Caring for the Social Body
"Adhering to the New Order of Things": Newspapers, Publishing, and the Making of a New Social Imaginary
Forced Peace
Interfacing with Writing and Print Culture
The Founding of Spanish-Language Newspapers
Producing a New Social Imaginary
Reconfigured Publics
A New Temporality
"The Natural Sympathies That Unite All of Our People": Political Journalism and the Struggle against Racism
Putting Pen to Political Work
Xenophobia and Anti-Mexican Violence
Representing Tejano Interests in the 1856 Election
Texas and the Gulf of Mexico Network
Reconfigured Imagined Communities
Racialization and Colonization
Conclusion
Surrounding Oneself with the Beauty of Life
A History of Writing, a Search for Presence
Appendixes: Transcriptions and Translations
Jos� Antonio Guti�rrez de Lara, "Americanos" (Proclamation, 1811; translation)
Jos� �lvarez de Toledo, Jes�s, Mar�a, y Jos� (Philadelphia, 1811; translation)
Governing Junta of B�xar, "We the Pueblo of the Province of Texas" (San Antonio, Texas, April 6,1813; transcription and translation)
Anonymous, "Remembrance of the Things That Took Place in B�xar in 1813 under the Tyrant Arredondo" (transcription and translation)
Notes
Acknowledgments
Index

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