New Geography of Jobs

ISBN-10: 0547750110
ISBN-13: 9780547750118
Edition: 2012
Authors: Enrico Moretti
List price: $28.00
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Description: A rising young economist at Berkeley argues that where you live will soon determine how successful you are—and tells us what that means for the country.There are many factors that determine a person’s success in life. We know that intelligence is  More...

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Book details

List price: $28.00
Copyright year: 2012
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company
Publication date: 5/22/2012
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 304
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.25" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 1.100
Language: English

A rising young economist at Berkeley argues that where you live will soon determine how successful you are—and tells us what that means for the country.There are many factors that determine a person’s success in life. We know that intelligence is only a small part of the equation—character traits like self-control, grit, and willpower are also important. Now an economist at the University of California, Berkeley, has found something that might matter even more: geography.In this important and persuasive book, Enrico Moretti argues that a "new geography of jobs" is emerging, and it’s benefiting centers of innovation like San Francisco, Boston, Austin, and Durham. But the winners and losers aren’t necessarily the people you’d expect. Moretti’s groundbreaking research shows that you don't have to be a scientist or an engineer to thrive in one of these high-tech hubs. The main beneficiaries are the workers who support the "idea-creators"—the carpenters, hair stylists, personal trainers, lawyers, doctors, and teachers. In fact, Moretti has shown that for every new innovation job in a city,fiveadditional non-innovation jobs are created, and those workers earn higher salaries than their counterparts in other urban areas. Live in one of these places and you will almost certainly be healthier and wealthier, even if you don't own a start-up.It wasn’t supposed to be this way. As the global economy shifted from agriculture to manufacturing to innovation, the world was supposed to become more flat. Geography was supposed to matter less. But the pundits were wrong. A new map is being drawn and it's not about red vs. blue or rich vs. poor. The rise of the hubs is causing huge geographic disparities in education, wealth, life expectancy, and political engagement. Dealing with this split—encouraging growth in the hubs while arresting the decline elsewhere—will be the challenge of the century, andThe New Geography of Jobslights the way.

Enrico Moretti is a professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley, and the recipient of several international honors, including a Fulbright Fellowship and the IZA Young Labor Economist Award. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health and several private foundations and has been featured in the New York Times , the Wall Street Journal , and Slate , among other publications.

Introduction
American Rust
Smart Labor: Microchips, Movies, and Multipliers
The Great Divergence
Forces of Attraction
The Inequality of Mobility and Cost of Living
Poverty Traps and Sexy Cities
The New "Human Capital Century"
Acknowledgments
Notes
References
Index

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