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Attacking Faulty Reasoning Practical Guide to Fallacy-Free Arguments

ISBN-10: 0534605168
ISBN-13: 9780534605162
Edition: 5th 2005 (Revised)
Authors: T. Edward Damer
List price: $90.95
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Description: Not only is ATTACKING FAULTY REASONING the most comprehensive, readable, and theoretically sound book on the common fallacies, it is also a well-designed primer for the construction and evaluation of arguments. Addressing over 60 fallacies and  More...

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Book details

List price: $90.95
Edition: 5th
Copyright year: 2005
Publisher: Wadsworth
Publication date: 2/26/2004
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 228
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.00" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.792
Language: English

Not only is ATTACKING FAULTY REASONING the most comprehensive, readable, and theoretically sound book on the common fallacies, it is also a well-designed primer for the construction and evaluation of arguments. Addressing over 60 fallacies and featuring a wealth of timely examples and exercises, this text will help students hone their skills in rational, argumentative discussion.

T. Edward Damer received his Ph.D. from Boston University and currently teaches at Emory and Henry College.

Introduction
Reasons for Using Good Arguments
Goals of the Text
A Code of Intellectual Conduct
An Effective Procedural Standard
An Important Ethical Standard
A Code of Conduct for Effective Discussion
The Fallibility Principle
The Truth-Seeking Principle
The Clarity Principle
The Burden of Proof Principle
The Principle of Charity
The Structural Principle
The Relevance Principle
The Acceptability Principle
The Sufficiency Principle
The Rebuttal Principle
The Resolution Principle
The Suspension of Judgment Principle
The Reconsideration Principle
The Fallibility Principle
The Truth-Seeking Principle
The Clarity Principle
Assignments
What is an Argument?
An Argument Is a Claim Supported by Other Claims
Distinguishing Argument from Opinion
The Burden of Proof Principle
The Standard Form of an Argument
The Principle of Charity
Deductive Versus Inductive Strength of Arguments
Moral Arguments Have a Moral Premise
Making the Moral Premise Explicit
Assignments
What is a Good Argument?
A Good Argument Must Meet Five Criteria
The Structural Principle
The Relevance Principle
The Acceptability Principle
Criteria of Acceptability
Conditions of Unacceptability
The Sufficiency Principle
The Rebuttal Principle
Making Arguments Stronger
Applying the Criteria to Arguments
The Resolution Principle
The Suspension of Judgment Principle
The Reconsideration Principle
Assignments
What is a Fallacy?
A Fallacy Is a Violation of a Criterion of a Good Argument
Named Versus Unnamed Fallacies
Organization of the Fallacies
Attacking the Fallacy
Rules of the Game
Assignments
Fallacies That Violate the Structural Criterion
Begging-the-Question Fallacies
Arguing in a Circle
Question-Begging Language
Complex Question
Question-Begging Definition
Assignments
Fallacies of Inconsistency
Incompatible Premises
Contradiction Between Premise and Conclusion
Assignments
Fallacies of Deductive Inference
Denying the Antecedent
Affirming the Consequent
False Conversion
Undistributed Middle Term
Illicit Distribution of an End Term
Assignments
Fallacies that Violate the Relevance Criterion
Fallacies of Irrelevance
Irrelevant Authority
Appeal to Common Opinion
Genetic Fallacy
Rationalization
Drawing the Wrong Conclusion
Using the Wrong Reasons
Assignments
Irrelevant Emotional Appeals
Appeal to Force or Threat
Appeal to Tradition
Appeal to Self-Interest
Playing to the Gallery
Assignments
Fallacies that Violate the Acceptability Criterion
Fallacies of Linguistic Confusion
Equivocation
Ambiguity
Misleading Accent
Illicit Contrast
Argument by Innuendo
Misuse of a Vague Expression
Distinction Without a Difference
Assignments
Unwarranted Assumption Fallacies
Fallacy of the Continuum
Fallacy of Composition
Fallacy of Division
False Alternatives
Is-Ought Fallacy
Wishful Thinking
Misuse of a Principle
Fallacy of the Mean
Faulty Analogy
Assignments
Fallacies that Violate the Sufficiency Criterion
Fallacies of Missing Evidence
Insufficient Sample
Unrepresentative Data
Arguing from Ignorance
Contrary-to-Fact Hypothesis
Fallacy of Popular Wisdom
Special Pleading
Omission of Key Evidence
Assignments
Causal Fallacies
Confusion of a Necessary with a Sufficient Condition
Causal Oversimplification
Post Hoc Fallacy
Confusion of Cause and Effect
Neglect of a Common Cause
Domino Fallacy
Gambler's Fallacy
Assignments
Fallacies that Violate the Rebuttal Criterion
Fallacies of Counterevidence
Denying the Counterevidence
Ignoring the Counterevidence
Assignments
Ad Hominem Fallacies
Abusive Ad Hominem
Poisoning the Well
Two-Wrongs Fallacy
Assignments
Fallacies of Diversion
Attacking a Straw Man
Trivial Objections
Red Herring
Resort to Humor or Ridicule
Assignments
Writing the Argumentative Essay
Researching the Question
Stating Your Position
Arguing for Your Position
Rebutting Objections to Your Position
Resolving the Question
Sample Argumentative Essay
Assignments
Letter to Jim
Glossary of Fallacies
Answers to Selected Assignments
Index

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