Mandates and Democracy Neoliberalism by Surprise in Latin America

ISBN-10: 0521805112
ISBN-13: 9780521805117
Edition: 2001
List price: $30.99 Buy it from $0.01
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Description: Sometimes politicians run for office promising one set of policies, and if they win, switch to very different ones. Latin American presidents in recent years have frequently run promising to avoid pro-market reforms and harsh economic adjustment,  More...

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Book details

List price: $30.99
Copyright year: 2001
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Publication date: 8/13/2001
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 238
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.00" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.748
Language: English

Sometimes politicians run for office promising one set of policies, and if they win, switch to very different ones. Latin American presidents in recent years have frequently run promising to avoid pro-market reforms and harsh economic adjustment, then win and transform immediately into enthusiastic market reformers. Does it matter when politicians ignore the promises they made and the preferences of their constituents? If politicians want to be reelected or see their party reelected at the end of their term, why would they impose unpopular policies? Susan Stokes develops a model of policy switches and tests it with statistical and qualitative data from Latin American elections over the last two decades. She concludes that politicians may change policies because unpopular policies are best for constituents and best serve their own political ambitions. Nevertheless, even though good representatives sometimes switch policies, abrupt change tends to erode the quality of democracy.

Elections, mandates, and representation
Electoral politics and economic policy in Latin America
Explaining policy switches
Are parties what's wrong with democracy in Latin America? neoliberalism without mandates: citizens respond
Mandates and democratic theory
Summary, predictions, unsettled questions
References

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