Digital Moviemaking

ISBN-10: 0495050342
ISBN-13: 9780495050346
Edition: 6th 2007
List price: $259.95
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Description: DIGITAL MOVIEMAKING is intended to meet the needs of professionals and students who are interested in digital moviemaking and want to emphasize the directorial and storytelling functions of the media. The text underscores the creative process?the  More...

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Book details

List price: $259.95
Edition: 6th
Copyright year: 2007
Publisher: Wadsworth
Publication date: 4/26/2006
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 288
Size: 8.50" wide x 10.75" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 1.342
Language: English

DIGITAL MOVIEMAKING is intended to meet the needs of professionals and students who are interested in digital moviemaking and want to emphasize the directorial and storytelling functions of the media. The text underscores the creative process?the kinds of decisions that are made and the strategies that are developed. Further, Gross and Ward stress the forethought and care that must go into all aspects of production, including the technical information that anyone engaged in production in this area should know. While concentrating on the narrative moving picture, many of the principles discussed are useful for other forms, such as documentaries, commercials, and music videos. The authors retain the sequence of information which has proven successful in the previous editions?a technical chapter is followed by a chapter geared toward the aesthetics of the same topic.

Lynne Schafer Gross is presently a Professor in the Department of Radio-TV-Film at California State University, Fullerton. She has written ten other textbooks and hundreds of magazine articles. In 1999 she was the recipient of the Frank Stanton Award for Distinguished Contribution to Electronic Media Education and in 1997 she received the Distinguished Education Service Award from the Broadcast Education Association. She is a past governor of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences and has also chaired that organization’s Library Committee and Student Activities Committee. As Past President of the Broadcast Education Association she increased membership 24% and funding 59%. Professionally, she is currently Associate Producer for the video series “Journeys Below the Line” and in the past she was Director of Programming for Valley Cable TV and the producer of numerous radio and TV programs for public, commercial, and cable outlets. Her teaching and consulting have taken her to many countries including Malaysia, Swaziland, Estonia, Australia, Guyana, and Russia. Her doctorate is from UCLA.

Larry Ward is a professor of radio-TV-film at California State University, Fullerton, where he teaches primarily film and television production and film history and aesthetics. While at the university, he has produced hundreds of hours of sports and public affairs programming broadcast and cablecast in the Los Angeles�Orange County area. He was producer director for "The Science Report", a series of 20-minute educational tapes for sixth-grade students, funded by Union Oil and the Placentia School District. Before that he was director-editor for "The Moving Picture Boys in the Great War", a one-hour documentary film for Post�Newsweek Television Productions, and "Lowell Thomas Remembers I and II," a series for public broadcasting. He has published a number of articles and papers and one other book, "The Motion Picture Goes to War." He has also served as the western regional coordinator for the Motion Picture Academy's Nicholl Fellowships in Screenwriting Contest. He has a B.A. from William Jewell College and an M.A. and Ph.D from the University of Iowa.

Preface
About the Authors
Overview of Moviemaking
Cast and Crew
Producing
Writing
Directing
Acting
Production Design
Picture Creation
Sound
Editing
Special and Visual Effects
Other
The Production Process
The Traditional Film Production Model
The Changing Nature of the Production Process
Notes
Planning the Movie
Finding and Financing the Right Script
Breaking Down the Script
Scheduling
Shooting Schedules
Stripboards
Production Schedules
Call Sheets
Other
Budgeting
Budgeting Procedures
Budgeting a Student Production
Casting
Hiring Behind-the-Scenes Personnel
Finding Locations
Designing and Constructing Sets
Designing Costumes, Wardrobe, Makeup, and Hairstyling
Obtaining Props
Developing Effects
Planning Sound
Acquiring and Checking Equipment
Obtaining Rights
Arranging for Travel and Food
Buying Insurance
Notes
Cameras
Aspect Ratio
Formats
Film Formats
Analog Video Formats
Digital Video Formats
High-Definition Video Formats
Technical Considerations
Resolution
Compression
Color Sampling
Bit Depth
Recording Media
Film Stock
Video Recording Media
Camera Construction
Film Cameras
Video Cameras
Time Code
Viewers
Basic Camera Features
Power
Recording Controls
Menus
Color Rendition
Gain
Shutter Speed
Other Features
Lenses
Focal Length
Focus
Aperture
Depth of Field
Camera Supports
Handheld Cameras
Tripods
Dollies and Cranes
Care of Equipment
Notes
Approaches to Image Capturing
Shot Determination
Basic Shots
Subjective Shots
Lens Selection
Focal Length Characteristics
Depth of Field
Camera Angle
Composing within the Static Frame
Manipulating the Mise-en-Scene
Balance
Creating Depth
On-Screen/Off-Screen Space
The Edge of the Frame
The Moving Frame
Camera Movements
Zooming
Time
Shooting Multi-Camera
Color and Tonality
Black and White or Color
Color Considerations
Shooting to Edit
Methods of Shooting Scenes
Shot Duration
Shooting for Continuity
Shooting for Visual Effects
Now That You Know the Rules ...
Notes
Lighting
Measuring the Light
Incident Meters
Reflected Light Meters
Spot Meters
Getting Correct Exposure
Problems with Automatic Metering Systems
Footcandles, F-Stops, and EI
Contrast Range
Using a Monitor to Help Evaluate Exposure
Using a Waveform Monitor to Evaluate Exposure
The Color of Light
The Electromagnetic Spectrum
The Klevin Scale
Tungsten and Daylight-Balanced Light
Small-Scale Color Corrections
The Vectorscope
Filters for Light Intensity and Contrast
Mounting Filters
Lighting Instruments
Lamps
Classification of Lights
Mounting Equipment
Controlling Light
Electric Power Requirements
Lighting Safety
Notes
Approaches to Lighting
Lighting Styles
Basic Three-Point Lighting
Comparison of Lighting for Film, SDTV, and HDTV
Preparing to Light
Outdoor Lighting
Contrast Reduction
Maintaining Continuity in Changing Light
Shooting at Night
Adapting to Weather Conditions
Indoor Lighting
Shooting in Available Light and Low Light
Bounce Lighting
Mixed Lighting
Lighting for Movement
Lighting for Multiple Cameras
Lighting for Visual Effects
Variations in Lighting
Notes
Microphones and Recorders
The Nature of Sound
Pitch and Frequency
Loudness and Amplitude
Timbre
Duration
Velocity
Microphones: Characteristics and Placement Techniques
Directionality
Construction
Positioning
Cables and Connectors
Balanced and Unbalanced Cables
Connector Types
Recorders
Double System and Single System Sound Recording
Types of Recorders
Recording Methods
Features of Sound Recorders
Audio Mixers
Care of Audio Equipment
Notes
Approaches to Sound Recording
Elements of Microphone Pickup
Presence
Perspective
Balance
Continuity
Eliminating Unwanted Noises
Miking Dialogue
Selecting the Mic
Setting Up the Mics
Special Dialogue Situations
Miking Automatic Dialogue Replacement
Miking Voice-Overs
Miking Sound Effects
Miking Foley
Miking Ambient Sounds
Miking Music
Recording Techniques
Notes
Directing
The Roles of the Director
Working with the Script
Working with the Producer and the Writer
Working with a Crew
Hiring Crew
Handling Crew
Auditioning Actors
Preliminaries
The Process
Rehearsing
Early Rehearsing
Ways to Improve Rehearsals
Shooting
A Typical Pattern
Dailies
Other Considerations
Editing
Notes
Editing
Making Material Computer Ready
Film
Analog Video
Digital Video
Setting Up the Computer
Logging
Capturing
Cutting Clips Together
Windows
The Assembly Process
Fine Tuning
Managing Audio
Adding Graphics
Creating Visual Effects
Adding Transitions
Useful Tools
Outputting the Project
Building a DVD
Notes
Approaches to Editing
Editing Styles
The Classical Hollywood Pattern
Variations
Editing Elements
Continuity
Shot Selection
Shot Relationships
Screen Direction
Cutting Points
Rhythm
Time and Space
Transitions
Notes
Enhanced Sound and Picture
Music
Sound Effects and Ambient Sounds
Foley
ADR and VO
Building Sound
Sweetening
Positioning
Mixing
Graphics
Visual Effects
Types of Visual Effects
The Process for Creating Computerized Visual Effects
Filter Effects
Color Correction
Compositing
The Digital Intermediate
Notes
Approaches to Enhanced Sound and Picture
Functions of Sound
Supplying Information
Enhancing Reality and Fantasy
Establishing Time, Place, and Character
Creating Mood and Emotion
Directing Attention
Functions of Picture
Supplying Information
Enhancing Reality and Fantasy
Establishing Time, Place, and Character
Creating Mood and Emotion
Directing Attention
Relating Sound and Picture to Each Other
Notes
The Final Stages of Moviemaking
Transferring Back to Film
Negative Cutting
Using a Digital Intermediate
Laboratory Work
Film Projection
Digital Cinema
Video Distribution
Netcasting
Festivals
Other Possibilities
Notes
Glossary
Index

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