Revolution Betrayed

ISBN-10: 0486433986
ISBN-13: 9780486433981
Edition: 2004
List price: $14.95
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Description: One of Marxism's most important texts, The Revolution Betrayed explores the fate of the Russian revolution after Lenin's death. Written in 1936 and published the following year, this brilliant and profound evaluation of Stalinism from the Marxist  More...

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Book details

List price: $14.95
Copyright year: 2004
Publisher: Dover Publications, Incorporated
Publication date: 2/20/2004
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 240
Size: 5.39" wide x 8.50" long x 0.51" tall
Weight: 1.210
Language: English

One of Marxism's most important texts, The Revolution Betrayed explores the fate of the Russian revolution after Lenin's death. Written in 1936 and published the following year, this brilliant and profound evaluation of Stalinism from the Marxist standpoint prophesied the collapse of the Soviet Union. Trotsky employs facts, figures, and statistics to show how Stalinist policies rejected the enormous productive potential of the nationalized planned economy engendered by the October Revolution. Instead, a privileged bureaucratic social caste seized power and promoted a wasteful and corrupt bureaucratic system that ultimately self-destructed. This insider's view of what went wrong will fascinate readers of every political persuasion. Unabridged republication of the classic 1937 edition.

Leon Trotsky was born Lev Davidovich Bronshteyn, the son of a prosperous Jewish farmer in the Ukraine. Sent to Odessa for his secondary-school education, he became a member of a Marxist circle in 1896. Imprisoned many times, he escaped from exile in Siberia in 1902 by using the name of a jailer called Trotsky on a false passport. During World War I, he lived in Switzerland, France, and New York City, where he edited the newspaper Novy Mir (New World). In 1917, after the overthrow of Tsar Nicholas II, he went back to Russia and joined Lenin in the first, abortive, July Revolution of the Bolsheviks. A key organizer of the successful October Revolution, he was People's Commissar for Foreign Affairs in the Lenin regime. But antagonism developed between him and Joseph Stalin during the Civil War of 1918--20, and after Lenin's death Stalin exiled him. Trotsky fled across Siberia to Norway, France, and finally Mexico, carrying with him source material on his experiences in the revolution. In Mexico he began working on the biography of his bitter enemy Stalin in a heavily barred and guarded home in Coyoacan. He realized he was racing against time and was able to complete 7 of the 12 chapters before a member of the Soviet secret police managed to work his way into the household by posing as a convert to Trotskyism. An attempt made on Trotsky's life in May 1940 was unsuccessful. Two months later another attempt was made. This one was successful---Trotsky was killed with a pickax at the desk where he was writing "Stalin," and the manuscript was spattered with its author's blood. The construction of the remaining five chapters was accomplished by the translator Charles Malamuth, from notes, worksheets, and fragments. Malamuth's translation of the initial chapters had been completed and checked by Trotsky before his death. A ruthless, energetic, and messianic visionary, Trotsky inspired both confidence and mistrust among those around him. In his later years, he was the focus of communists opposed to Stalin. A writer of power and venom, he was an advocate of permanent world revolution.

Introduction: The Purpose of the Present Work
Postscript
What has Been Achieved
The Principal Indices of Industrial Growth
Comparative Estimate of These Achievements
Production Per Capita of the Population
Economic Growth and the Zigzags of the Leadership
"Military Communism," "The New Economic Policy" (NEP) and the Course Toward the Kulak
"A Sharp Turn: "The Five-Year Plan in Four Years" and "Complete Collectivization"
Socialism and the State
The Transitional Regime
Program and Reality
The Dual Character of the Workers' State
"Generalized Want" and the Gendarme
The "Complete Triumph of Socialism" and the "Reinforcement of the Dictatorship"
The Struggle for Productivity of Labor
Money and Plan
"Socialist" Inflation
The Rehabilitation of the Ruble
The Stakhanov Movement
The Soviet Thermidor
Why Stalin Triumphed
The Degeneration of the Bolshevik Party
The Social Roots of Thermidor
The Growth of Inequality and Social Antagonisms
Want, Luxury and Speculation
The Differentiation of the Proletariat
Social Contradictions in the Collective Village
The Social Physiognomy of the Ruling Stratum
Family, Youth and Culture
Thermidor in the Family
The Struggle Against the Youth
Nationality and Culture
Foreign Policy and the Army
From "World Revolution" to "Status Quo"
The League of Nations and the Communist International
The Red Army and Its Doctrines
The Abolition of the Militia and the Restoration of Officers' Ranks
The Soviet Union in a War
Social Relations in the Soviet Union
State Capitalism?
Is the Bureaucracy a Ruling Class?
The Question of the Character of the Soviet Union Not Yet Decided by History
The Soviet Union in the Mirror of the New Constitution
Work "According to Ability" and Personal Property
The Soviets and Democracy
Democracy and the Party
Whither the Soviet Union?
Bonapartism as a Regime of Crisis
The Struggle of the Bureaucracy with "the Class Enemy"
The Inevitability of a New Revolution
"Socialism in one Country"
The "Friends" of the Soviet Union

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