Managing Business Ethics Straight Talk about How to Do It Right

ISBN-10: 0471755257
ISBN-13: 9780471755258
Edition: 4th 2007 (Revised)
List price: $137.95 Buy it from $1.99
This item qualifies for FREE shipping

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee

If an item you ordered from TextbookRush does not meet your expectations due to an error on our part, simply fill out a return request and then return it by mail within 30 days of ordering it for a full refund of item cost.

Learn more about our returns policy

Description: This text moves beyond the scope of prescriptive individual ethical decision making, to examine how managers and organizations influence ethical decision-making and behavior. It helps readers understand why people behave the way they do, and how  More...

Used Starting from $61.42
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
coins
coins
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Study Briefs

Limited time offer: Get the first one free! (?)

All the information you need in one place! Each Study Brief is a summary of one specific subject; facts, figures, and explanations to help you learn faster.

Add to cart
Study Briefs
Business Ethics Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
Business Law Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
Management Online content $4.95 $1.99

Customers also bought

Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading

Book details

List price: $137.95
Edition: 4th
Copyright year: 2007
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated
Publication date: 8/11/2006
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 432
Size: 6.00" wide x 8.75" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.990
Language: English

This text moves beyond the scope of prescriptive individual ethical decision making, to examine how managers and organizations influence ethical decision-making and behavior. It helps readers understand why people behave the way they do, and how managers and corporations can positively influence the behavior of employees and improve the ethical decision-making capabilities of their employees. Throughout, the emphasis is on common, real-life work situations, including hiring, managing, assessing performance, disciplining, firing, and providing incentives for staff, as well as producing quality products and services, and dealing effectively and fairly with customers, vendors, and other stakeholders.

Katherine Nelson is Distinguished Professor of Psychology Emerita at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

Preface
Introduction to Business Ethics
Introducting Straight Talk About Managing Business Ethics: Where We're Going and Why
Introduction
Taking Away the Mystery
Moving beyond Cynicism
Tools to Manage Unethical Behavior
Focus on the Positive, the Ethical, and the Socially Responsible
Is Business Ethics Just a Fad?
Can Business Ethics Be Taught?
Aren't Bad Apples the Cause of Ethical Problems in Organizations?
Shouldn't Employees Already Know the Difference between Right and Wrong?
Aren't Adults' Ethics Fully Formed and Unchangeable?
This Book Is About Managing Ethics
Bringing Ethics Down to Size
Ethics and the Law
How the Book Is Structured
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
Exercise: Your Cynicism Quotient
Notes
Why Be Ethical? (Why Bother? Who Cares?)
Introduction
Why Be Ethical? Why Bother? Who Cares?
The Motivation to Be Ethical
The Media Focus on Ethics and Corporate Reputation
Industries Care About Ethics
Executive Leaders Care About Ethics
Managers Care About Ethics
Employees Care About Ethics: Employee Attraction and Commitment
Individuals Care About Ethics: Reputation Counts
Does Society Care? Business and Social Responsibility
Economic Responsibilities
Legal Responsibilities
Ethical Responsibilities
Philanthropic Responsibilities
Government Regulation of Business
Is Socially Responsible Business Good Business?
Socially Responsible Investors
Avoiding the Costs of Criminal Liability
The Importance of Trust
The Best and the Worst In Us
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
Case: Merck and River Blindness
How Fines Are Determined under the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines
Notes
Ethics and the Individual
Common Ethical Problems
Introduction
Human Resources Issues
Discrimination
Harassment, Sexual and Otherwise
Conflicts of Interest
What Is It?
Why Is It an Ethical Problem?
Costs
Customer Confidence Issues
What Is It?
Why Is It an Ethical Problem?
Costs
Use of Corporate Resources
What Is It?
Why Is It an Ethical Problem?
Costs
When All Else Fails: Blowing the Whistle
When Do You Blow the Whistle?
How to Blow the Whistle
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
Notes
Deciding What's Right: A Prescriptive Approach
Introduction
The Layoff
Prescriptive Approaches to Ethical Decision Making in Business
Focus on Consequences (Consequentialist Theories)
Focus on Duties, Obligations, and Principles (Deontological Theories)
Focus on Integrity (Virtue Ethics)
Eight Steps to Sound Ethical Decision Making in Business
Gather the Facts
Define the Ethical Issues
Identify the Affected Parties (the Stakeholders)
Identify the Consequences
Identify the Obligations
Consider Your Character and Integrity
Think Creatively about Potential Actions
Check Your Gut
Practical Preventive Medicine
Doing Your Homework
When You're Asked to Make a Snap Decision
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
Exercise: Clarifying Your Values
Case: Pinto Fires
Notes
Deciding What's Right: A Psychological Approach
Introduction
Moral Awareness and Moral Judgment
Individual Differences, Moral Judgment, and Ethical Behavior
Cognitive Moral Development
Locus of Control
Cognitive Barriers to Good Ethical Judgment
Thinking About Fact Gathering
Thinking About Consequences
Thinking About Integrity
Thinking About Your Gut
Emotions in Ethical Decision Making
Reflections on the Pinto Fires Case
Revisiting the Pinto Fires Case
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
Notes
Ethics And The Manager
Ethical Problems of Managers
Introduction
Managers and Employee Engagement
Managing the "Basics"
Hiring and Work Assignments
Performance Evaluation
Discipline
Terminations
Managing a Diverse Workforce
Diversity
Harassment
Family and Personal Issues
The Manager as a Lens
The Buck Stops with Managers
Managers Are Role Models
Managing Up and Across
Honesty Is Rule One
Standards Go Both Ways
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
Notes
Managing for Ethical Conduct
Introduction
In Business, Ethics Is About Behavior
Practical Advice for Managers about Ethical Behavior
Our Multiple Ethical Selves
The Kenneth Lay Example
The Dennis Levine Example
Practical Advice for Managers About Multiple Ethical Selves
Reward Systems
People Do What's Rewarded and Avoid Doing What's Punished
People Will Go the Extra Mile to Achieve Goals Set by Managers
How Reward Systems Can Encourage Unethical Behavior
Practical Advice for Managers About Reward Systems
Recognize the Power of Indirect Rewards and Punishments
Can You Really Reward Ethical Behavior?
What About Punishment?
Practical Advice for Managers About Punishment
"Everyone's Doing It"
People Follow Group Norms
Rationalizing Unethical Behavior
Pressure to Go Along
Practical Advice for Managers About Group Norms
People Fulfill Assigned Roles
The Zimbardo Prison Experiment
Roles at Work
Conflicting Roles Can Lead to Unethical Behavior
Roles Can Support Ethical Behavior
Practical Advice for Managers About Roles
People Do What They're Told
The Milgram Experiments
Obedience to Authority at Work
Practical Advice for Managers About Obedience to Authority
Responsibility Is Diffused in Organizations
"Don't Worry-We're Taking Care of Everything"
Diffusing Responsibility in Groups
Diffusing Responsibility by Dividing Responsibility
Diffusing Responsibility by Creating Psychological Distance
Practical Advice for Managers About Personal Responsibility
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
Case: Sears, Roebuck and Co.: The Auto Center Scandal
Notes
Ethics and the Organization
Ethical Problems of Organizations
Introduction
Managing Stakeholders
Ethics and Consumers
Conflicts of Interest
Product Safety
Advertising
Ethics and Employees
Employee Safety
Employee Downsizings
Ethics and Shareholders
Ethics and the Community
Why Are These Ethical Issues?
Costs
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
Notes
Ethics as Organizational Culture
Introduction
A "Cookie Cutter" Approach Won't Work
Organizations Don't Have Cookie-Cutter Ethical Problems
Cookie-Cutter Programs Are Superficial
"Ethics for a Day" Breeds Cynicism
Proactively Develop an Ethical Organizational Culture
Organizational Ethics as a Cultural Phenomenon
What Is Culture?
Strong versus Weak Cultures
How Culture Influences Behavior: Socialization and Internalization
Ethical Leadership
Ethical Leaders Create Culture
Leaders Maintain or Change Organizational Culture
Formal Cultural Systems
Selection Systems
Values and Mission Statements, Policies and Codes
Orientation and Training Programs
Performance Management Systems
Organizational Structure
Decision-Making Processes
Informal Cultural Systems
Heroes and Role Models
Norms: "The Way We Do Things Around Here"
Rituals
Myths and Stories
Language
Developing and Changing the Ethical Culture
How an Ethical Culture Can Become an Unethical Culture
Becoming a More Ethical Culture
A Cultural Approach to Changing Organizational Ethics
A Cultural Systems View
A Long-Term View
Assumptions About People
Diagnosis: The Ethical Culture Audit
Ethical Culture Change Intervention
The Ethics of Managing Organizational Ethics
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
Case: Videotek Corporation
Case: Culture Change at Texaco
Case: An Unethical Culture in Need of Change: TAP Phamaceuticals
Notes
Managing Ethics and Legal Compliance
Introduction
Structuring Ethics Management
Managing Ethics: The Corporate Ethics Office
Ethics Officers
The Ethics Infrastructure
The Corporate Ethics Committee
Communicating Ethics
Basic Communications Principles
Evaluating the Current State of Ethics Communications
Multiple Communications Channels for Formal Ethics Communication
A Novel Approach to Ethics Communication at USAA
Mission or Values Statements
Policy Manuals
Codes of Conduct
Communicating Senior Management Commitment to Ethics
Formal and Informal Systems to Resolve Questions and Report Ethical Concerns
Using the Reward System to Reinforce the Ethics Message
Evaluating the Ethics Program
Surveys
Values or Compliance Approaches
Globalizing an Ethics Program
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
Notes
Ethics and the World
Managing for Ethical Conduct in a Global Business Environment
Introduction
Focus on the Individual Expatriate Manager
The Difficulties of Foreign Business Assignments
The Need for Structure, Training, and Guidance
Foreign Language Proficiency
Learning About the Culture
Recognizing the Fower of Selective Perception
Assumption of Behavioral Consistency
Assumption of Cultural Homogeneity
Assumption of Similarity
Ethics-Related Training and Guidance
How Different Are Ethical Standards in Different Cultures?
Development of Corporate Guidelines and Policies for Global Business Ethics
The Organization in a Global Business Environment
Deciding to Do Business in a Foreign Country
Development of a Transcultural Corporate Ethic
Putting It All Together: Royal Dutch Shell
Conclusion
Discussion Questions
Caux Round Table Principles for Business
Notes
Index

×
Free shipping on orders over $35*

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

Learn more about the TextbookRush Marketplace.

×