Sampling

ISBN-10: 0470402318

ISBN-13: 9780470402313

Edition: 3rd 2012

List price: $188.95 Buy it from $56.99 Rent it from $31.38
eBook available
This item qualifies for FREE shipping

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee

If an item you ordered from TextbookRush does not meet your expectations due to an error on our part, simply fill out a return request and then return it by mail within 30 days of ordering it for a full refund of item cost.

Learn more about our returns policy

Description: The Third Edition retains the general organization of the prior two editions, but it incorporates new material throughout the text. The book is organized into six parts: Part I covers basic sampling from simple random sampling to unequal probability sampling; Part II treats the use of auxiliary data with ratio and regression estimation and looks at the ideas of sufficient data, model, and design in practical sampling; Part III covers major useful designs such as stratified, cluster and systematic, multistage, and double and network sampling; Part IV examines detectability methods for elusive populations, and basic problems in detectability, visibility, and catchability are discussed; Part V concerns spatial sampling with the prediction methods of geostatistics, considerations of efficient spatial designs, and comparisons of different observational methods including plot shapes and detection aspects; and Part VI introduces adaptive sampling designs in which the sampling procedure depends on what is observed during the survey. For this new edition, the author has focused on thoroughly updating the book with a special emphasis on the first 14 chapters since these topics are invariably covered in basic sampling courses. The author has also implemented new approaches to explain the various techniques in the book, and as a result, new examples and explanations have been added throughout. In an effort to improve the presentation and visualization of the book, new figures as well as replacement figures for previously existing figures have been added. This book has continuously stood out from other sampling texts since the figures evoke the idea of each sampling design. The new figures will help readers to better visualize and understand the underlying concepts such as the different sampling strategies.

Used Starting from $56.99
New Starting from $119.81
Rent Starting from $31.38
eBooks Starting from $102.99
Buy eBooks
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
coins
coins
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Study Briefs

Limited time offer: Get the first one free! (?)

All the information you need in one place! Each Study Brief is a summary of one specific subject; facts, figures, and explanations to help you learn faster.

Add to cart
Study Briefs
Calculus 1 Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
Algebra Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
Introduction to Logic Online content $4.95 $1.99

Customers also bought

Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading

Book details

List price: $188.95
Edition: 3rd
Copyright year: 2012
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated
Publication date: 2/22/2012
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 472
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.50" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 2.002
Language: English

Preface
Preface to the Second Edition
Preface to the First Edition
Introduction
Basic Ideas of Sampling and Estimation
Sampling Units
Sampling and Nonsampling Errors
Models in Sampling
Adaptive and Nonadaptive Designs
Some Sampling History
Basic Sampling
Simple Random Sampling
Selecting a Simple Random Sample
Estimating the Population Mean
Estimating the Population Total
Some Underlying Ideas
Random Sampling with Replacement
Derivations for Random Sampling
Model-Based Approach to Sampling
Computing Notes
Entering Data in R
Sample Estimates
Simulation
Further Comments on the Use of Simulation
Exercises
Confidence Intervals
Confidence Interval for the Population Mean or Total
Finite-Population Central Limit Theorem
Sampling Distributions
Computing Notes
Confidence Interval Computation
Simulations Illustrating the Approximate Normality of a Sampling Distribution with Small n and N
Daily Precipitation Data
Exercises
Sample Size
Sample Size for Estimating a Population Mean
Sample Size for Estimating a Population Total
Sample Size for Relative Precision
Exercises
Estimating Proportions, Ratios, and Subpopulation Means
Estimating a Population Proportion
Confidence Interval for a Proportion
Sample Size for Estimating a Proportion
Sample Size for Estimating Several Proportions Simultaneously
Estimating a Ratio
Estimating a Mean, Total, or Proportion of a Subpopulation
Estimating a Subpopulation Mean
Estimating a Proportion for a Subpopulation
Estimating a Subpopulation Total
Exercises
Unequal Probability Sampling
Sampling with Replacement: The Hansen-Hurwitz Estimator
Any Design: The Horvitz-Thompson Estimator
Generalized Unequal-Probability Estimator
Small Population Example
Derivations and Comments
Computing Notes
Writing an R Function to Simulate a Sampling Strategy
Comparing Sampling Strategies
Exercises
Making The Best Use Of Survey Data
Auxiliary Data and Ratio Estimation
Ratio Estimator
Small Population Illustrating Bias
Derivations and Approximations for the Ratio Estimator
Finite-Population Central Limit Theorem for the Ratio Estimator
Ratio Estimation with Unequal Probability Designs
Models in Ratio Estimation
Types of Estimators for a Ratio
Design Implications of Ratio Models
Computing Notes
Exercises
Regression Estimation
Linear Regression Estimator
Regression Estimation with Unequal Probability Designs
Regression Model
Multiple Regression Models
Design Implications of Regression Models
Exercises
The Sufficient Statistic in Sampling
The Set of Distinct, Labeled Observations
Estimation in Random Sampling with Replacement
Estimation in Probability-Proportional-to-Size Sampling
Comments on the Improved Estimates
Design and Model
Uses of Design and Model in Sampling
Connections between the Design and Model Approaches
Some Comments
Likelihood Function in Sampling
Some Useful Designs
Stratified Sampling
Estimating the Population Total
With Any Stratified Design
With Stratified Random Sampling
Estimating the Population Mean
With Any Stratified Design
With Stratified Random Sampling
Confidence Intervals
The Stratification Principle
Allocation in Stratified Random Sampling
Poststratification
Population Model for a Stratified Population
Derivations for Stratified Sampling
Optimum Allocation
Poststratification Variance
Computing Notes
Exercises
Cluster and Systematic Sampling
Primary Units Selected by Simple Random Sampling
Unbiased Estimator
Ratio Estimator
Primary Units Selected with Probabilities Proportional to Size
Hansen-Hurwitz (PPS) Estimator
Horvitz-Thompson Estimator
The Basic Principle
Single Systematic Sample
Variance and Cost in Cluster and Systematic Sampling
Computing Notes
Exercises
Multistage Designs
Simple Random Sampling at Each Stage
Unbiased Estimator
Ratio Estimator
Primary Units Selected with Probability Proportional to Size
Any Multistage Design with Replacement
Cost and Sample Sizes
Derivations for Multistage Designs
Unbiased Estimator
Ratio Estimator
Probability-Proportional-to-Size Sampling
More Than Two Stages
Exercises
Double or Two-Phase Sampling
Ratio Estimation with Double Sampling
Allocation in Double Sampling for Ratio Estimation
Double Sampling for Stratification
Derivations for Double Sampling
Approximate Mean and Variance: Ratio Estimation
Optimum Allocation for Ratio Estimation
Expected Value and Variance: Stratification
Nonsampling Errors and Double Sampling
Nonresponse, Selection Bias, or Volunteer Bias
Double Sampling to Adjust for Nonresponse: Callbacks
Response Modeling and Nonresponse Adjustments
Computing Notes
Exercises
Methods For Elusive And Hard-To-Detect Populations
Network Sampling and Link-Tracing Designs
Estimation of the Population Total or Mean
Multiplicity Estimator
Horvitz-Thompson Estimator
Derivations and Comments
Stratification in Network Sampling
Other Link-Tracing Designs
Computing Notes
Exercises
Detectability and Sampling
Constant Detectability over a Region
Estimating Detectability
Effect of Estimated Detectability
Detectability with Simple Random Sampling
Estimated Detectability and Simple Random Sampling
Sampling with Replacement
Derivations
Unequal Probability Sampling of Groups with Unequal Detection Probabilities
Derivations
Exercises
Line and Point Transects
Density Estimation Methods for Line Transects
Narrow-Strip Method
Smooth-by-Eye Method
Parametric Methods
Nonparametric Methods
Estimating f (0) by the Kernel Method
Fourier Series Method
Designs for Selecting Transects
Random Sample of Transects
Unbiased Estimator
Ratio Estimator
Systematic Selection of Transects
Selection with Probability Proportional to Length
Note on Estimation of Variance for the Kernel Method
Some Underlying Ideas about Line Transects
Line Transects and Detectability Functions
Single Transect
Average Detectability
Random Transect
Average Detectability and Effective Area
Effect of Estimating Detectability
Probability Density Function of an Observed Distance
Detectability Imperfect on the Line or Dependent on Size
Estimation Using Individual Detectabilities
Estimation of Individual Detectabilities
Detectability Functions other than Line Transects
Variable Circular Plots or Point Transects
Exercise
Capture-Recapture Sampling
Single Recapture
Models for Simple Capture-Recapture
Sampling Design in Capture-Recapture: Ratio Variance Estimator
Random Sampling with Replacement of Detectability Units
Random Sampling without Replacement
Estimating Detectability with Capture-Recapture Methods
Multiple Releases
More Elaborate Models
Exercise
Line-Intercept Sampling
Random Sample of Lines: Fixed Direction
Lines of Random Position and Direction
Exercises
Spatial Sampling
Spatial Prediction or Kriging
Spatial Covariance Function
Linear Prediction (Kriging)
Variogram
Predicting the Value over a Region
Derivations and Comments
Computing Notes
Exercise
Spatial Designs
Design for Local Prediction
Design for Prediction of Mean of Region
Plot Shapes and Observational Methods
Observations from Plots
Observations from Detectability Units
Comparisons of Plot Shapes and Detectability Methods
Adaptive Sampling
Adaptive Sampling Designs
Adaptive and Conventional Designs and Estimators
Brief Survey of Adaptive Sampling
Adaptive Cluster Sampling
Designs
Initial Simple Random Sample without Replacement
Initial Random Sample with Replacement
Estimators
Initial Sample Mean
Estimation Using Draw-by-Draw Intersections
Estimation Using Initial Intersection Probabilities
When Adaptive Cluster Sampling Is Better than Simple Random Sampling
Expected Sample Size, Cost, and Yield
Comparative Efficiencies of Adaptive and Conventional Sampling
Further Improvement of Estimators
Derivations
Data for Examples and Figures
Exercises
Systematic and Strip Adaptive Cluster Sampling
Designs
Estimators
Initial Sample Mean
Estimator Based on Partial Selection Probabilities
Estimator Based on Partial Inclusion Probabilities
Calculations for Adaptive Cluster Sampling Strategies
Comparisons with Conventional Systematic and Cluster Sampling
Derivations
Example Data
Exercises
Stratified Adaptive Cluster Sampling
Designs
Estimators
Estimators Using Expected Numbers of Initial Intersections
Estimator Using Initial Intersection Probabilities
Comparisons with Conventional Stratified Sampling
Further Improvement of Estimators
Example Data
Exercises
Answers to Selected Exercises
References
Author Index
Subject Index
×
Free shipping on orders over $35*

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

Learn more about the TextbookRush Marketplace.

×