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Nature's Fortune How Business and Society Thrive by Investing in Nature

ISBN-10: 0465031811
ISBN-13: 9780465031818
Edition: 2013
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Description: Environmentalism has traditionally been anathema to business. To most corporations, nature is merely the source of commodities—raw materials—to be extracted and sold. Short-term profits override long-term environmental consequences; sustainability  More...

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Book details

List price: $30.00
Copyright year: 2013
Publisher: Basic Books
Publication date: 4/9/2013
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 272
Size: 6.50" wide x 9.75" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 1.320
Language: English

Environmentalism has traditionally been anathema to business. To most corporations, nature is merely the source of commodities—raw materials—to be extracted and sold. Short-term profits override long-term environmental consequences; sustainability is sacrificed for the bottom line. The green lobby is a petty annoyance, a fly to be squashed under the great force of capitalism. And the ill-will goes the other way—environmentalists are generally scornful of big business and its ruthless, single-minded search for profit; they are skeptical of any “green” initiatives a corporation might sponsor.But economic growth and the well-being of nature are not mutually exclusive. InNature's FortuneCEO of the Nature Conservancy (and former Goldman Sachs banker) Mark Tercek and conservation biologist Jonathan Adams argue that profit and environmental stewardship need not be competing ends, and that in fact, saving nature is the smartest investment any business or government can make.Tercek and Adams show that the responsible stewardship of natural resources is now of utmost economic importance for people who do not traditionally consider themselves environmentalists. Farmers, ranchers, loggers, fishermen, miners, corporate executives, and investment bankers must begin to properly value the natural systems their business depends on—and account for them on their balance sheets. After all, whether you’re talking about company assets or natural resources, success in business and conservation ultimately both depend on properly assessing value.This idea is slowly but surely taking hold in unexpected corners. For instance: In Iowa, the unprecedented occurrence of three 500-year floods over a 17-year period awakened the corn farming community to the reality that the area’s economic future was dependent on the conservation of floodplains. Thus a broad coalition of unlikely collaborators, including sportsmen, farmers, conservation organizations, business leaders, and elected officials, worked together to pass the largest conservation ballot initiative in the country, an amendment to the Iowa state constitution that would create a fund to reduce, prevent, and mitigate the impacts from future flooding. In the largely red state of Iowa, the amendment received more votes than the Republican candidate for governor.Nature's Fortunewill tell the story of a new kind of conservation—bold, flexible, innovative, financially sophisticated, and relevant from megacities to small towns to trackless wilderness, from the developed world to the remote countryside. It is a revolutionary guide to the world’s economic—and environmental—well-being.

A Note to Readers
Introduction
Maybe It's Not Chinatown After All
Not a Drop to Drink
Let Floodplains Be Floodplains
The New Fishing
Feeding the World-and Saving It
The Million-Dollar Mile
Investing in the Future in the Face of Climate Change
Town and Country
The Business Case for Nature
Conclusion
Acknowledgments
Works Cited
Index

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