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Sound for Digital Video

ISBN-10: 0415812089
ISBN-13: 9780415812085
Edition: 2nd 2013 (Revised)
List price: $49.95 Buy it from $39.92
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Description: The distinguishing feature of many low-budget films and TV shows is often the poor sound quality. Now, filmmakers shooting DV on a limited budget can learn from Tomlinson Holman, a film sound production pioneer, how to make their films sound like  More...

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Book details

List price: $49.95
Edition: 2nd
Copyright year: 2013
Publisher: Elsevier Science & Technology Books
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 376
Size: 7.75" wide x 9.50" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 1.672
Language: English

The distinguishing feature of many low-budget films and TV shows is often the poor sound quality. Now, filmmakers shooting DV on a limited budget can learn from Tomlinson Holman, a film sound production pioneer, how to make their films sound like fully professional productions. Holman offers suggestions that you can apply to your own project from preproduction through postproduction and provides tips and solutions on production, editing, and mixing.Holman, sound engineer on such films as Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom and Star Wars: Return of the Jedi, is famous for his pioneering work in film sound production and for developing THX. Now, he brings his expertise to the relatively new field of sound for digital video productions. Once considered an amateur format, digital video is becoming the format of choice for some feature films and for many lower budget productions; this book will enable you to use this medium to create the most professional and effective sound possible.

Preface
Basic Concepts
Digital Video Landscape
Minimum Standards for Audio
The Four Dimensions of a Sound Track
Digital Sound
Features of Digital Video Recording Formats
Introduction to Digital Video
Basic Digital
Some Basic Video for Audio People
Frame Rates
Interlaced Video
"Film" Look
Resolution and Aspect Ratio
Under- and Over-Cranked Camera
Operational Matters
Quality Modes and Codecs
Interchangeability
Off-Line/Online
Time Code
User Bits
PAL Formats
Locked versus Unlocked Audio Sample Rate
Instant Playback
Interconnecting Video
Conclusion
Preproduction Planning
The First Big Step: A Dedicated Sound Person
Location Scouting
Choosing a Sound and Camera Workflow
Single-System Recording
Double-System Recording
Testing Sync
Mic, Line, and Speaker Level
Reference Levels and Headroom
Setting Up the Recording Chain
Line Levels
Mixing Balanced and Unbalanced Connections
Production Sound I: General Considerations
Coverage
Scene Coverage and Microphone Technique
What Can Be Done with an On-Camera Microphone?
How to Use the Two Channels
Other Items Recorded during Production Sound
Microphone Accessories
Booms/Fishpoles
Shock Mounts
Windscreens
Pop Suppression
Case Studies
Mounting Lavs
Radio Mic Usage
Disposable Mics
Production Sound Example
Boom Operator's Job
Common Problems
Logging
DV Production Sound Log
Sound Kit Accessories
Production Sound II: Microphones
Power
Dynamic Microphones
Polar Patterns
Differences Between Microphones Having Various Types of Polar Patterns
The Radio Part of Radio Mies
Production Sound III: Dealing with the Output of Microphones
Recording Level Parallels to Early Cinematography
Cries
Whispers
Cries and Whispers
Multiple Level Controls in the Chain
Another Kind of Overload Distortion and How to Avoid It
Combining Features for Best Wind Performance
Media Management
What Counts as a Backup?
Types of Media
Streaming Transfers and File Transfers
Streaming Transfers
File Transfers
Audio File Formats
Managing Double-System Recordings
Syncing Footage
Time code Autosync
PluralEyes and DualEyes to Autosync
Syncing by Hand with a Clapperboard Slate
If a Slate Wasn't Used (What to Do in Case of Emergency)
Common Problems in Digital Audio File Transfers for Sound Accompanying Picture
Sound Design
Film Sound Styles
Realism
Stretched Reality
What is Seen versus What is Heard: On-Screen versus Off-Screen
Hyper-reality
Surrealism
Montage
Shifting Levels of Reality
Sound Design as an Art
Spotting
Editing
Non-Linear Editing
Random-Access Editing
Non-Destructive Editing
Visual Waveform Editing
Edits and Fade Files
File Management
How to Edit
Fine Editing of Production Sound
Stealing Presence
Where Presence Is Used
Documentary Considerations
Fixing Bumps
Sound Effects
Ambience/Backgrounds
Foley Effects
Cutting Music
Scene Changes
Plug-Ins/Processes
Tracks and Channels
Busses
Pan Pots
Solo/Mute
Grouping Tracks
Differences Between Picture and Sound Editing Systems
Picture-Sound Sync Resolution
Mixing
The Mixing Hourglass
Audio Processes
Processes Related Mainly to Level
Level Controls
Gain Staging
Hand Compression
Compression
Limiting
De-esser
Noise Gate
Downward Expander
Processes Related Mainly to Frequency
Equalization
Filters
Combinations of Level and Frequency
Time-Based Devices
Reverberation
Other Time-Based Effects
Other Plug-Ins
Panning
Routing, and Limitations Caused by Routing
Busses, Channels
Delay Compensation
Voice Limitation
How to Mix
Masters and Monitoring
Choice of Sound Format on Edit and Delivery Masters
Uses of Surround Sound
Mastering for Level
Background on -20 versus -12 dBFS Reference Level
Level Calibration
When You Can't Calibrate with Test Signals
Best One-Size-Fits-All Approach
Mastering for DVD, Blu-ray, Digital Broadcast, and Digital Satellite Television
Monitoring
Film versus Video Mixes
Index

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