Arguing about Art Contemporary Philosophical Debates

ISBN-10: 0415424518
ISBN-13: 9780415424516
Edition: 3rd 2007 (Revised)
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Description: P Offering a unique 'debate' format, the third edition of EM /EM the bestselling EM Arguing about Art /EM  is ideal for newcomers to aesthetics or philosophy of art. /P P This lively collection presents an extensive range of short, clear  More...

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Book details

List price: $49.95
Edition: 3rd
Copyright year: 2007
Publisher: Routledge
Publication date: 10/8/2007
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 488
Size: 7.00" wide x 9.75" long x 1.50" tall
Weight: 2.244
Language: English

P Offering a unique 'debate' format, the third edition of EM /EM the bestselling EM Arguing about Art /EM  is ideal for newcomers to aesthetics or philosophy of art. /P P This lively collection presents an extensive range of short, clear introductions to each of the discussions which include: /P UL LI sentimentality /LI LI appreciation /LI LI interpretation /LI LI understanding /LI LI objectivity /LI LI nature /LI LI food /LI LI horror. /LI /UL P With revised introductions, updated suggestions for further reading and new sections on pornography and societies without art, EM Arguing About Art  /EM provides EM /EM a stimulating and accessible anthology suitable for those coming to aesthetics for the first time. The book will also appeal to students of art history, literature, and cultural studies. /P

#60;b#62;Alex Neill#60;/b#62; is a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Southampton. His current focus is on the history of 18#60;sup#62;th#60;/sup#62;- and 19#60;sup#62;th#60;/sup#62;-century philosophical aesthetics. He is co-editor (with Aaron Ridley) of #60;i#62;The Philosophy of Art: Readings Ancient and Modern#60;/i#62; (1995) and #60;i#62;Arguing About Art: Contemporary Philosophical Debates#60;/i#62;, 3e (2007).#60;p#62;#60;b#62;Christopher Janaway#60;/b#62; is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Southampton. His research interests fall chiefly in the areas of 19#60;sup#62;th#60;/sup#62;-century German philosophy and aesthetics. His recent books include #60;i#62;Schopenhauer: A Very Short Introduction#60;/i#62; (2002), #60;i#62;Reading Aesthetics: Selected Texts with Interactive Commentary#60;/i#62; (Blackwell, 2005), and #60;i#62;Beyond Selflessness: Reading Nietzsche#8242;s#60;/i#62; #60;i#62;Genealogy#60;/i#62; (2007).

Preface
Acknowledgements
Introduction
The Art of Food?
Can we think of cooking as an art form and the dishes it produces as works of art?
What in the end makes a practice an art form and a product a work of art?
Elizabeth Telfer, aFood as Arta
Carolyn Korsmeyer, aThe Meaning of Taste and the Taste of Meaninga
The aAuthentica Performance of Music What is it to give an aauthentica performance of a piece of music?
Should a performance be faithful to the composer's artistic intentions?
Would an aauthentica performance have any aesthetic advantages?
Stephen Davies, aAuthenticity in Musical Performancea
James O. Young, aThe Concept of Authentic Performancea
Fakes and Forgeries Would we be justified in revising our aesthetic judgment of a work after learning that it is a fake?
In what ways does (or should) our knowledge that an artwork is an original bear upon our aesthetic valuation of it?
Alfred Lessing, aWhat is Wrong with a Forgery?a
Denis Dutton, aArtistic Crimesa
Rock Music and Culture What role does music play in a culture?
What does the widespread preference for rock music over classical music say about contemporary Western culture?
Roger Scruton, aThe Decline of Musical Culturea
Theodore Gracyk, aMusic's Worldly Uses, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and to Love Led Zeppelina
Appreciation, Understanding and Nature Are there correct and incorrect ways of appreciating nature and appreciating works of art?
How does our aesthetic appreciation of nature differ from our aesthetic appreciation of works of art?
Allen Carlson, aAesthetic Appreciation of the Natural Environmenta
Noil Carroll, aOn Being Moved By Nature
Between Religion and Natural
Historya
Malcolm Budd, aModels of Nature Appreciationa
Photography and Representation Are we interested in photographs for their own sake, or are we interested in photographs only for the sake of what they are photographs of?
Is photography a representational art form?
How does aesthetic appreciation of photographs differ from aesthetic appreciation of paintings?
Roger Scruton, aPhotography and Representationa
Dominic Lopes, aThe Aesthetics of Photographic Transparencya
Dawn M. Phillips, aThe Real Challenge for an Aesthetics of Photographya
Feelings and Fictions Fictional characters aren't real, so why should we care about what happens to them?
Are we genuinely moved by fictional events?
If so, how are our responses best understood?
Kendall Walton, aFearing Fictionallya
Alex Neill, aFiction and the Emotionsa
Enjoying Horror Why is it that we take such enjoyment in horror movies and novels?
Why would one seek out works which are apparently designed to make us experience feelings and emotions such as fear and revulsion?
Noil Carroll, aWhy Horror?a
Berys Gaut, aThe Paradox of Horrora
Sentimentality What makes an artwork, or a response to an artwork, sentimental?
Is sentimental art always bad art?
What makes sentimentality objectionable, when it is?
Is sentimentality ever appropriate in a work or a response?
Anthony Savile, aSentimentalitya
Ira Newman, aThe Alleged Unwholesomeness of Sentimentalitya
David Pugmire, aSentimentality and Truthfulnessa
Pornography and Erotica
Is there a difference bet

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